You are here

Activism & Organizing

Activism logo

First Nationwide Oil Worker Strike In Decades Grows Even Bigger

Banner%20Corporate%20Accountability.jpg

  • On Friday, the local Toledo union posted on its Facebook page that the “strike is NOT about money, this is about addressing safety issues that have been ignored for way too long … 138 workers were killed on the job while extracting, producing, or supporting oil and gas in 2012 … the number was more than double that of 2009.”
  • The Gulf Oil Spill, February 8, 2015

Ari Phillips, ClimateProgress

PineTreeLogo200%20w%3A10%20yr%20Banner_0.jpgIf you are on a tight budget, don't contribute cash! Instead, contribute by forwarding articles to your friends - and non-Progressives too ;). And because we need help building our all reader supported Evergreene Digest community, you can invite your Facebook friends and Twitter followers to join us. That's a big help too. 

15297348113_4ed9b0573d_z-638x425.jpgAerial photo of the BP refinery in Whiting, Indiana. Credit: Flickr/Joey Lax-Salinas 

February 8, 2015 | On Sunday, workers at two BP oil refineries in Ohio and Indiana walked out as part of a nationwide oil worker strike being led by the United Steelworkers Union (USW). Citing unfair labor practices and dangerous conditions, including leaks and explosions, the approximately 1,440 workers will join nearly 4,000 that began striking a week ago on February 1.

The first nationwide strike by oil refinery workers since 1980, the addition of BP’s Whiting, Indiana, refinery and the company’s joint-venture refinery with Husky Energy in Toledo, Ohio, brings the total number of plants with strikers to 11, including refineries accounting for about 13 percent of total U.S. oil refining capacity. The original strike included workers in California, Kentucky, Texas and Washington.

Ari Phillips is a reporter for ClimateProgress.org.

Full story … 

The Gulf Oil Spill, February 8, 2015, Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

banner-oilspill.jpg

  • After Gulf Oil Spill, BP Is Recovering Faster Than Environment
  • Part 1: 10 million 'missing' gallons of crude oil from BP's 2010 oil spill has been found.
  • Part 2: BP Gets A Pass On Billions Of Dollars In Fines For Gulf Oil Spill

Say No to Secret Guns at the Capitol: Join Us Feb. 23

  • The first dangerous bill has been introduced: H.F. 372, a bill to allow people to carry loaded guns at the Capitol without having to notify public safety officials. 
  • Take%20Action%20Today%20button.jpgCan you help us stop this dangerous bill?

 

Heather Martens, Protect Minnesota

witter-4-512.pngNow you can follow Evergreene Digest on Twitter

Dear Friend,

6213-bible-gun-flag-032412.jpgFebruary 3, 2015 | The first dangerous bill has been introduced: H.F. 372, a bill to allow people to carry loaded guns at the Capitol without having to notify public safety officials. Apparently the safety of school groups and families touring the Capitol isn't a high priority for gun extremists. Guns shouldn't be carried at the Capitol at all -- let alone without a notification requirement. Can you help us stop this dangerous bill?

Take%20Action%20Today%20button.jpgJoin us on Monday, Feb. 23 at 10:30 in Saint Paul to stand up for your values -- for the right of every child, from every neighborhood, to live free of the fear of gun violence. 

Click here to RSVP.  A program from 11-1 with testimonials and a legislative issue training will be followed by visits to legislators for those who sign up.

H.F. 372 is just one in a series of extreme bills we expect to see introduced. Other proposals would legalize silencers; allow people to carry loaded guns in public without any kind of permit at all; and gut our existing gun laws by amending the state constitution. We need your help to stop these dangerous bills.  

Take%20Action%20Today%20button.jpgPlease join us at our lobby day on Feb. 23.

Thank you for all you do,

Heather Martens, Executive Director, Protect Minnesota: Working to End Gun Violence

Related:

Tom Engelhardt | Remembrance of Wars Past: Why There Is No Massive Antiwar Movement in the US

 

  •  …if much in the American way of war remains dismally familiar some five decades later, one thing of major significance has changed, something you can see regularly in I.F. Stone’s Weekly but not in our present world.  Thirteen years after our set of disastrous wars started, where is the massive antiwar movement, including an army in near revolt and a Congress with significant critics in significant positions?
  • It's The Blind Partisanship

Tom Engelhardt, TomDispatch / Rise Up Times ·

If you like reading this article, consider joining the crew of all reader-supported Evergreene Digest by contributing the equivalent of a cafe latte a month--using the donation button above—so we can bring you more just like it.

images_2015_02/2015.2.3.Vietnam.main.gif(Photo: Fank Wolfe via Wikimedia Commons)

There was the old American lefty paper, the Guardian, and the Village Voice, which beat the Sixties into the world, and its later imitators like the Boston Phoenix. There was Liberation News Service, the Rat in New York, the Great Speckled Bird in Atlanta, the Old Mole in Boston, the distinctly psychedelic Chicago SeedLeviathan, Viet-Report, and the L.A. Free Press, as well as that Texas paper whose name I long ago forgot that was partial to armadillo cartoons.

And they existed, in the 1960s and early 1970s, amid a jostling crowd of hundreds of “underground” newspapers — all quite aboveground but the word sounded so romantic in that political moment.  There were G.I. antiwar papers by the score and high school rags by the hundreds in an “alternate” universe of opposition that somehow made the rounds by mail or got passed on hand-to-hand in a now almost unimaginable world of interpersonal social networking that preceded the Internet by decades. And then, of course, there was I.F. Stone’s Weekly (1953-1971): one dedicated journalist, 19 years, every word his own (except, of course, for the endless foolishness he mined from the reams of official documentation produced in Washington, Vietnam, and elsewhere).

Tom Engelhardt created and runs the Tomdispatch.com website, a project of The Nation Institute where he is a Fellow. He is the author of a highly praised history of American triumphalism in the Cold War, The End of Victory Culture, and of a novel, The Last Days of Publishing, as well as a collection of his Tomdispatch interviews, Mission Unaccomplished. Each spring he is a Teaching Fellow at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley.

Full story … 

Related:

It's The Blind Partisanship, David Swanson, Warisacrime.org

1123x77xbanner.jpg.pagespeed.ic.kPy3SrJi0y.jpg

  • "While the Democratic Party was able to leverage antiwar sentiments effectively in promoting its own electoral success, the antiwar movement itself ultimately suffered organizationally from its ties to the Democratic Party."
  • "[T]he parties agree more on the substance of policy than their political rhetoric suggests."
  • Chris Hedges | The Left Has Lost It's Nerve and Direction
  • Ted Rall | At Some Point, Progressives Need to Break Up With the Democratic Party 

Shell’s Kulluk Disaster Featured in New York Times Sunday Magazine

Environment%20Banner.jpg

  • Unfortunately, Shell wants to return to the Arctic this coming summer. The oil giant has submitted plans to bring the Noble Discoverer and another drillship to the Chukchi Sea this year. That could spell double trouble for the Arctic. 
  • sign-btn.pngTell the Secretary of the Interior to say “no” to Shell’s risky drilling plans.  Please sign our petition today.

Andrew Hartsig, Ocean Conservancy

Photo: Coast Guard 

January 2, 2015 | In late December of 2012, one of Shell Oil’s Arctic drillships, the Kulluk, snapped its tow-line during a powerful storm in the North Pacific. After multiple failed attempts to re-establish a tow, the Coast Guard evacuated the crew of the Kulluk, rescue tugs abandoned their efforts to pull the ship to safety, and the Kulluk grounded on Sitkalidak Island near Kodiak, Alaska.  The January 4 issue of the New York Times Sunday Magazine tells the dramatic story of the events that led up to the disaster in an article entitled, The Wreck of the Kulluk.

The Sunday Magazine story tells a gripping tale, especially if you like accounts of drama on the sea. Aside from being a good read, the story makes clear that Shell and its contractors easily could have avoided the disaster. Before leaving port, the tug’s tow master predicted that Kulluk’s planned route “guarantees an ass kicking.” Warnings signs don’t get much clearer than that. But the tow master’s caution, like many other warning signs—was ignored.

Andrew Hartsig is the director of Ocean Conservancy’s <http://blog.oceanconservancy.org> Arctic Program. He lives and works in Anchorage, Alaska. 

sign-btn.pngTell the Secretary of the Interior to say “no” to Shell’s risky drilling plans.  Please sign our petition today.

Full story … 

It's The Blind Partisanship

1123x77xbanner.jpg.pagespeed.ic.kPy3SrJi0y.jpg

  • "While the Democratic Party was able to leverage antiwar sentiments effectively in promoting its own electoral success, the antiwar movement itself ultimately suffered organizationally from its ties to the Democratic Party."
  • "[T]he parties agree more on the substance of policy than their political rhetoric suggests."
  • Chris Hedges | The Left Has Lost It's Nerve and Direction
  • Ted Rall | At Some Point, Progressives Need to Break Up With the Democratic Party 

David Swanson, Warisacrime.org

February, 2015 | Why did the peace movement grow large around 2003-2006 and shrink around 2008-2010? Military spending, troop levels abroad, and number of wars engaged in can explain the growth but not the shrinkage. Those factors hardly changed between the high point and the low point of peace activism.

Was pulling troops out of Iraq and sending them in huge numbers into Afghanistan a move the public favored? There's not much evidence for the second half of that, and it was never a demand of the peace movement at its height. Did the wars become more legal, more honest, more internationally accepted? Hardly. The United States escalated in Afghanistan and remained in Iraq as other nations ended their minor roles in those wars. The U.S. president began taking drone wars into a number of other countries with no domestic or international authorization at all, as he would later do with Libya, and then back into Iraq again (which Congress is considering possibly deliberating on whether to debate retroactively "authorizing").

David Swanson is an American activist, blogger and author of "When the World Outlawed War," "War Is A Lie" and "Daybreak: Undoing the Imperial Presidency and Forming a More Perfect Union."

Full story … 

Related:

Series | 2014 Mid-term Election Guide, Part 1: The Left Has Lost It's Nerve and Direction, Chris Hedges, Truthdig 

Politics%20Banner.jpg

If the left wants to regain influence in the nation’s political life, it must be willing to walk away from the Democratic Party … and back progressive, third-party candidates until the Democrats feel enough heat to adopt our agenda. We must be willing to say no. If not, we become slaves.

###

Series | 2014 Mid-term Election Guide, Part 2: At Some Point, Progressives Need to Break Up With the Democratic Party, Ted Rall, AlterNet

  • If you're a leftie, the Democratic establishment doesn't care about your opinion. They certainly don't want your input. What they want is your vote -- in exchange for exactly nothing in return. They're political parasites, draining the enthusiasm and idealism of progressives, simultaneously neutering and exploiting mainline libs.
  • The Left Has Lost It’s Nerve and Direction

 

Pages