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America’s angriest white men: Up close with racism, rage and Southern supremacy

  • Up close with small-town white rage, with bitter, scary men who feel left behind by economic and cultural change
  • Excerpted from “Angry White Men: American Masculinity at the End of an Era”  
  • Chris Hayes, pro athletes, and “being a man”

Michael Kimmel, Salon

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southern_pickup-620x412.jpgSunday, Nov 17, 2013 | Who are the white supremacists? There has been no formal survey, for obvious reasons, but there are several noticeable patterns. Geographically, they come from America’s heartland—small towns, rural cities, swelling suburban sprawl outside larger Sunbelt cities. These aren’t the prosperous towns, but the single-story working-class exurbs that stretch for what feels like forever in the corridor between Long Beach and San Diego (not the San Fernando Valley), or along the southern tier of Pennsylvania, or spread all through the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, across the vast high plains of eastern Washington and Oregon, through Idaho and Montana. There are plenty in the declining cities of the Rust Belt, in Dearborn and Flint, Buffalo and Milwaukee, in the bars that remain in the shadows of the hulking deserted factories that once were America’s manufacturing centers. And that doesn’t even touch the former states of the Confederacy, where flying the Confederate flag is a culturally approved symbol of “southern pride”—in the same way that wearing a swastika would be a symbol of German “heritage” (except it’s illegal in Germany to wear a swastika).

1369871308l/16197150.jpg There’s a large rural component. Although “the spread of far-right groups over the last decade has not been limited to rural areas alone,” writes Osha Gray Davidson, “the social and economic unraveling of rural communities—especially in the midwest—has provided far-right groups with new audiences for their messages of hate. Some of these groups have enjoyed considerable success in their rural campaign.” For many farmers facing foreclosures, the Far Right promises to help them save their land have been appealing, offering farmers various schemes and legal maneuvers to help prevent foreclosures, blaming the farmers’ troubles on Jewish bankers and the one-world government. “As rural communities started to collapse,” Davidson writes, the Far Right “could be seen at farm auctions comforting families . . . confirming what rural people knew to be true: that their livelihoods, their families, their communities—their very lives—were falling apart.” In stark contrast to the government indifference encountered by rural Americans, a range of Far Right groups, most recently the militias, have seemingly

Excerpted from “Angry White Men: American Masculinity at the End of an Era” by Michael Kimmel.

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Chris Hayes, pro athletes, and “being a man”, Elizabeth Stoker, Salon

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  • In 2014, are we really arguing over men taking paternity leave? Here’s what’s really driving this screwed-up debate. 
  • Our demented masculinity debate
  • Sounds like some "men" have jock itch where their brains would be normally.
  • Homosexuality Is Natural

Chris Hayes, pro athletes, and “being a man”

Sex%20%26%20Relationships%20Banner.jpg

  • In 2014, are we really arguing over men taking paternity leave? Here’s what’s really driving this screwed-up debate. 
  • Our demented masculinity debate
  • Sounds like some "men" have jock itch where their brains would be normally.
  • Homosexuality Is Natural
  • America’s angriest white men: Up close with racism, rage and Southern supremacy

Elizabeth Stoker, Salon

%2522%40%2522%20Logo%20with%2010%20yr%20banner.jpg To stay on top of important articles like these, sign up here to receive the latest updates from all reader supported Evergreene Digest.

hayes_murphy-620x412.jpg Chris Hayes, Daniel Murphy (Credit: MSNBC/AP/Seth Wenig)

Friday, Apr 11, 2014 | When New York Mets second baseman Daniel Murphy decided to take paternity leave earlier this month to welcome his child into the world, he probably didn’t expect the firestorm of commentary his decision would provoke. That’s fair enough, because putting one’s family before one’s professional obligations is likely the most benign, reasonable decision a person could possibly make. But that didn’t stop sports commentator Mike Francesca from blasting Murphy on his sports radio show, claiming that Murphy should’ve hired a nurse and that, on the whole, paternity leave is a “scam.” (Francesca’s sentiments were shortly echoed by retired football player Boomer Esiason, who proposed the Murphy family should’ve scheduled an elective pre-season C-section rather than opt for paternity leave.)

MSNBC’s Chris Hayes called in to his own show – from which he is currently taking leave to be with his wife and newborn son – to condemn Francesca’s “Neanderthalish” comments on paternity leave, noting that taking time off to be with one’s wife and child following a birth is “part of being a man.” Hayes wasn’t alone in identifying old-fashioned notions of gender as key in the paternity leave debate; at the Nation, Dave Zirin chalked up the suspicion and excoriation of leave for dads to a culture of toxic masculinity.

Elizabeth Stoker writes about Christianity, ethics, and policy for Salon, The Atlantic, and The Week. She is a graduate of Brandeis University, a Marshall Scholar, and a current Cambridge University divinity student. 

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Related:

Homosexuality Is Natural, Aaron Jackson, Exposing the Truth

  • While I understand there is a natural fear of that which is different, it’s the 21st century, so instead of complaining about how others live, let’s focus on how we live and what we can change to make our lives better.
  • The right’s single-mom mistake: Why their latest attacks are clueless and doomed.

 

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America’s angriest white men: Up close with racism, rage and Southern supremacy, Michael Kimmel, Salon

  • Up close with small-town white rage, with bitter, scary men who feel left behind by economic and cultural change
  • Excerpted from “Angry White Men: American Masculinity at the End of an Era” 
  • Chris Hayes, pro athletes, and “being a man”

Global rankings study: America in warp-speed decline

  • From access to healthcare and education to gender equality, the U.S. resembles a second-rate nation.
  • Why Do We Fear the Truth?

CJ Werleman, Alternet

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images/102512-1.jpg (Image: Lance Page / Truthout; Adapted: Sean McMenemy, Paula Bailey

Tuesday, April 8, 2014 | If America needed a reminder that it is fast becoming a second-rate nation, and that every economic policy of the Republican Party is wrongheaded, it got one this week with the release of the Social Progress Index (SPI).

Harvard business professor Michael E. Porter, who earlier developed the Global Competitiveness Report, designed the SPI. A new way to look at the success of countries, the SPI studies 132 nations and evaluates 54 social and environmental indicators for each country that matter to real people. Rather than measuring a country’s success by its per capita GDP, the index is based on an array of data reflecting suicide, ecosystem sustainability, property rights, access to healthcare and education, gender equality, attitudes toward immigrants and minorities, religious freedom, nutrition, infrastructure and more.

CJ Werleman is an Australian born atheist author, columnist, and U.S political and social commentator.

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Why Do We Fear the Truth? Robert J. Burrowes 

  • The most important impediment to understanding and resolving any problem or conflict is our fear of knowing the truth. We spend a lot of our time trying to deal with problems and conflicts by deluding ourself about the cause and/or the solution necessary.
  • "We would rather be ruined than changed. We would rather die in our dread than climb the cross of the moment and let our illusions die." -- W H Auden
  • The Super Bowl of War: Three Decades of Failure in Afghanistan

 

The Joy and Resolve of a Movement Built on Creative Resistance

  • Art has added energy to advocacy — and it reaches people at deeper emotional levels, conveying what cannot be said with mere facts.
  • People sharing and participating together in building a movement of creative resistance whose foundations are joy and resolve spurs us to re-imagine and create the world we want to see.
  • Creative Resistance: A Showcase for Activist Art

Kevin Zeese and Margaret Flowers, Popular Resistance

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Occupy-Puppets-protesting-the-Trans-Pacific-Partnership.jpg Occupy Puppets Protesting the Trans-Pacific Partnership

March 5th, 2014 | In 2011, when occupy encampments exploded across the United States putting the issue of the unfair economy and corruption of Wall Street on the political agenda, there was also an explosion of activist art. Beginning with the iconic image of the ballerina on top of the Wall Street Bull, art has been central to occupy and was an important reason for its powerful impact.

The explosion of arts activism involves a wide variety of artistic forms: puppets, balloons, music, meme’s, posters, banners, plays, street theater, poetry, animation and light displays among others. Art has added vitality and energy to advocacy; and it reaches people at deeper emotional levels and in their hearts conveying what cannot be said with mere facts.

Kevin Zeese and Margaret Flowers are participants in PopularResistance.org. They also co-direct It’s Our Economy and are co-hosts of Clearing the FOG, shown on UStream TV and heard on radio.

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eatmoney-366x240.jpg Photo by Stephen Melkisethian / Creative Resistance 

Creative Resistance: A Showcase for Activist Art

A project of PopularResistance.org

Launched in February, 2014, Creative Resistance was started with the goal of promoting and supporting activist art. Creative Resistance is a place for artists to share their work and for everyone to be inspired.

Our home page is a Pinterest-style poster board providing a daily stream of activist art. You’ll see pictures of puppets, protest signs and other visual art, along with embedded videos of music and performance art. Our art groups page lists activist art groups around North America to help you connect and participate locally.

We also have a news blog where we report on current happenings within the activist art world. Our site is constantly expanding. If you have other ideas or you would like to get involved, please contact us.

And don’t forget to submit your own art as we are constantly adding new content. Come back often to see the latest posts, and to share, pin and tweet them. By doing so you are supporting the individual artists as well as the movement for social and political change!

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It's the Racism, Stupid: Meet the Press's Epic NCAA Fail

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  • It is March Madness, after all, when the NCAA makes 90% of its billion-dollar budget. As the business of college football and basketball expands, and as more and more players find themselves used up and spit out with neither compensation nor education to show for their time, this is the moment to talk about the future of the so-called "student-athlete."
  • How the NCAA Endangers Women

Dave Zirin, TheNation.com

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Reggie Love, Mark Emmert and Arne Duncan debate the paying of student-athletes on NBC's Meet the Press. (Courtesy of NBC News)

March 23, 2014 | I will say this for the much-maligned David Gregory era of Meet the Press: the weekly program, with the tenacity of a twitter-troll, remains pugnaciously beltway-centric in its perspective. This was seen in Sunday's "debate" about the state of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Their timing was certainly spot-on. It is March Madness, after all, when the NCAA makes 90% of its billion-dollar budget. As the business of college football and basketball expands, and as more and more players find themselves used up and spit out with neither compensation nor education to show for their time, this is the moment to talk about the future of the so-called "student-athlete."

To discuss this issue, Gregory secured three people for the Meet the Press table, including NCAA President Mark Emmert. That's good start! Mark Emmert, is a man who makes a $2 million annual salary defending the status quo. The people Emmert could have been in discussion with is tantalizing. Maybe we would see civil rights author Taylor Branch, whose piece on the NCAA rocked the sports world. Perhaps one of the other guests would be New York Times columnist William Rhoden, whose book $40 Million Slaves examined the social position of African-American athletes. Or we could get USA Today's Christine Brennan, who has written extensively about equity for women in college athletics.

Dave Zirin, The Nation’s sports correspondent, is the author, most recently, of Game Over: How Politics Has Turned the Sports World Upside Down. Named one of UTNE Reader’s “50 Visionaries Who Are Changing Our World,” Zirin is a frequent guest on MSNBC, ESPN, and Democracy Now! 

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How the NCAA Endangers Women, Jessica Luther, Atlantic

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  • 'We Felt Like We Were Above the Law'
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