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Andy Singer | Were getting soft / CagleCartoons.com

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Medal of Honor

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  • "It's fun killing people.  I get to roam around and feel like soldiers feel. I've played the bad guys before, but this will be even better because it's based on the real thing. You don't want to hurt other Americans, but you've got to win the game.” --A 13 year old player.
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  • The Killing Games We Play
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  • War Games: Army Lures Civilians By Letting Them Play Soldier
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  • Going to the Mines to Look for Diamonds
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Wikipedia

Medal of Honor (MoH) is the name of a series of first-person shooter games set in World War II, and with an upcoming title based on the conflicts of present day Afghanistan that will be released in October 2010.

The first game was developed by DreamWorks Interactive (currently known as Danger Close) and published by Electronic Arts in 1999 for the PlayStation game console. Medal of Honor spawned a series of follow-up games including multiple expansions spanning various console platforms and the PC and Apple Mac. The series was created by filmmaker Steven Spielberg.

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The Killing Games We Play, Coleen Rowley, Evergreene Digest

The mother of a soldier killed in Iraq criticizes the fact that “In 'Medal of Honor,' gamers can play Taliban and kill U.S. soldiers” (article 8/27/2010) but sadly enough, the mother apparently can’t let herself see how the present wars do, in fact, resemble a giant game, certainly to the politicians, generals and war profiteers who started them and who play with others’ lives. 

Meanwhile, the 13 year old kid who exclaims: "It's fun killing people.  I get to roam around and feel like soldiers feel. I've played the bad guys before, but this will be even better because it's based on the real thing. You don't want to hurt other Americans, but you've got to win the game,” will probably find it easy in a few years to move from one killing game to the next. 

In the end we all lose this game.

War Games: Army Lures Civilians By Letting Them Play Soldier, Joseph De Avila, Wall Street Journal | NY

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  • Recruiters Bring Lifelike Videogame To Amusement Parks, and Kids Love It
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  • The Virtual Army Experience -- a traveling exhibit of the U.S. Army -- has been touring the country for the past year and a half, stopping at amusement parks, air shows and county fairs. The Army, which collects information from the thousands of people who play the game, says it's an innovative way to reach a new audience. But critics don't like the idea of the military using giant videogames as a recruiting tool.
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Going to the Mines to Look for Diamonds ~ Ronald D. Fricker, Jr., and C. Christine Fair, Google Books
Experimenting with Recruiting Stations in Malls
Read free...

Section(s): 

Summary: Intolerance, Hate, Intimidation, Fear-mongering, Violence, Incivility, and Ignorance Move Mainstream: Week of Aug 29

5 New Items including:

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  • Facebook devolves into dark web of anonymous hate speech
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  • International Protests Begin Ahead of Sept. 11 Koran Burning Event in Florida
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David Culver, ed., Evergreene Digest

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Sabaaneh

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Pursuit of Happiness, Stuart Klawans, The Nation

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  • What is the point of having an imagination, I ask you, if the only thing that can be imagined is mayhem, perpetrated without regard for even the appearance of human life?
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  • Reviews of Christopher Nolan's Inception; Todd Solondz's Life During Wartime and Samuel Maoz's Lebanon.
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Facebook devolves into dark web of anonymous hate speech, Mike Adams, NaturalNews.com

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  • Facebook has, for reasons you'll soon see, brought out the worst in many people, devolving into a tangled web of anonymous hate speech directed to anything and everything within reach.
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  • How Facebook became a hate engine
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  • How Facebook Betrayed Users and Undermined Online Privacy
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  • Write Congress Through Facebook!
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  • Goodbye, Blog
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Online ranters increasingly pay a legal price, David G. Savage,  Seattle Times | WA
The Internet has allowed tens of millions of Americans to be published writers. But it also has led to a surge in lawsuits from those who say they were hurt, defamed or threatened by what they read.

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Mama Grizzly (and other setbacks), Ellen Goodman, Boston Globe

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  • The Year of the Pink Elephant Women was enough to force our one-woman jury back to its annual task. Once more we celebrate suffrage by giving out the Equal Rites Awards to those who done their best over the past 12 months to set back the cause of women.
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  • Before we get trampled, the envelopes please.
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International Protests Begin Ahead of Sept. 11 Koran Burning Event in Florida, Democratic Underground
Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Thomas Sklarski
Roughly 100 Indonesian Islamists protested outside the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta on Friday, Agence France-Press reported, with some threatening holy war if the plan to burn Korans on the ninth anniversary of the Sept. 11 terror attacks comes to fruition at the Dove World Outreach Center in Gainesville, Fla.

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Pursuit of Happiness

What is the point of having an imagination, I ask you, if the only thing that can be imagined is mayhem, perpetrated without regard for even the appearance of human life?
Reviews of Christopher Nolan's Inception; Todd Solondz's Life During Wartime and Samuel Maoz's Lebanon.

Stuart Klawans, The Nation

From Leonardo DiCaprio, speaking in the respectable blockbuster of summer 2010, we learn that no virus multiplies more explosively than an idea; in which case, I'd like to know why the Centers for Disease Control allowed all those people to watch Inception. Lax government supervision of Christopher Nolan, whose credit will hereafter be changed in my book from "writer-director" to "primary vector," has allowed a fresh strain of twisted ideational RNA to burrow into the nervous systems of tens of millions of Americans, when they'd already been infected with that characteristic disorder of our time, Wachowski Syndrome.

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It was, of course, through the authors of The Matrix that the virus became pandemic: the notion that you, hero, should feel free to use the snazziest conceivable arsenal to kill as many people as you like, because they're not real. Those human-shaped objects are just shades of an illusory world to which you owe not the slightest responsibility. In The Matrix, this dreamland was controlled by monsters from outer space, from whom Earth had to be liberated. In Inception, it is not quite controlled by corporate spies, and the liberation (for DiCaprio) requires the snapping of tentacles that are emotional rather than ickily extraterrestrial. And yet, in either case, the activity within the fantasy realm is exclusively a matter of bang! bang! kaboom!

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Summary: Intolerance, Hate, Intimidation, Fear-mongering, Violence, Incivility, and Ignorance Move Mainstream: Week of Aug 22

5 New Items including:
In today’s world, it’s play or be played
40 Religious Leaders Denounce Sarah Palin and Fox’s Hate Speech

David Culver, ed., Evergreene Digest

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Clay Jones

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In today’s world, it’s play or be played, Syl Jones, Star Tribune | MN
Psychiatrist Eric Byrne, in his seminal 1964 book "Games People Play," defined a game as, "a recurring set of transactions ... with a concealed motivation ... or gimmick." That nails the world in which we live.

40 Religious Leaders Denounce Sarah Palin and Fox’s Hate Speech, Jason Easley, Politicus USA
Top Religious Leaders Challenge Newt Gingrich and Sarah Palin To Stop Exploiting Fear

Wing-Nut Rep. Louis Gohmert Goes Nuts on Anderson Cooper Over “Terror Babies” Conspiracy Theory, Joshua Holland, AlterNet
The frightening thing about this clip is that you really get the sense that Louis Gohmert, R-Texas, actually believes this nonsense.

Mexican attacks inflame tensions on Staten Island, Cristian Salazar, Associated Press, in Salon
Olmedo, who was hospitalized for five days and was briefly in a coma, contends he was targeted because of his ethnicity, not because he had been involved in a related incident or because the suspects wanted to steal his belongings.

As Gibbs Attacks Progressive Critics, ACLU Says Obama White House Enshrining Bush-Era Policies, Amy Goodman, Democracy Now!

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  • It’s disappointing that the administration uses this kind of language to respond to thoughtful and considered criticism. I think it debases political discourse in this country. And part of the Press Secretary’s job is to make sure that political discourse is civil and informed.
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  • ACLU Report: Obama Continuing Bush-Era Torture Policies
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