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‘On Contact With Chris Hedges’: Eugene O’Neill’s Revision of Electra Shatters the American Myth

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RT via YouTube

O’Neill viewed the illusions that continue to power the American myth machine, “which have now largely supplanted reality itself, as a kind of disease eating away at the American soul.” --Chris Hedges

Kasia Anderson, Truthdig 

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Apr 23, 2017 | A culture saturated with artifice and false promises of success and happiness doesn’t easily accommodate the kinds of ideas playwright Eugene O’Neill made it his business to dramatize onstage. As Chris Hedges explains in this week’s episode of his RT show “On Contact,” that’s precisely why his work is so important at this moment.

Calling O’Neill “America’s most revolutionary and perhaps greatest playwright,” who took on the critical project of “shattering of the American myth,” Hedges invites two people who know his work from the inside out—actor Eunice Wong and director David Herskovits—for a conversation about O’Neill’s significance. Wong, who is Hedges’ wife, as well as Truthdig’s book review editor, will appear as Lavinia Mannon in the Target Margin Theater’s production of “Mourning Becomes Electra.” Directed by Herskovits at the Abrons Art Center in New York City, the play opens Wednesday and runs through May 20.

Kasia Anderson is a deputy editor at Truthdig .

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Nothin’ but Debt: Which NCAA Tournament Schools Give Low-Income Students the Best Shot?

 

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(Credit: Getty/Al Bello) 

So who fares well in this tournament?

Mike Tigas and Olga Pierce, ProPublica  

March 16, 2017 | We used federal data to create an NCAA Tournament bracket based on five factors that measure each school’s ability to graduate low-income students with little debt: the percentage of undergraduates from low-income households, the average financial support given to those students, the tuition discount that those students receive, their post-graduation debt, and the percentage of those students who are unable to pay back their loans after graduation.

Click any game in the bracket below to view more information on how both schools fare in each Debt by Degrees head-to-head matchup. You can also compare any two schools by clicking here.

 

Mike Tigas is a News Applications Developer at ProPublica. He also works on tools for online privacy and the liberation of public data.

Olga Pierce is the Deputy Data Editor. Previously, she was a reporter at ProPublica, specializing in data-driven stories.

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March Madness and money: Should American universities spend so much serious cash on sports? David MasciotraSalon

  • Most college athletic programs are a financial burden to their schools. As higher ed costs increase, why keep them?
  • Related: From the Archives | The Problem with Subsidizing Huge Stadiums for Billionaire Team Owners

Our greatest peril? Screening ourselves off from reality

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The YouTube vlogger PewDiePie, who paid two Indian men to hold up a sign reading “DEATH TO ALL JEWS”. Photograph: Adithya Sambamurthy/The Guardian for the Guardian

  • Immersed in life online like the followers of 4chan or PewDiePie, we start to imagine that nothing matters – even racism, misogyny and resurgent fascism.
  • Related: Chris Hedges | A Nation of the Walking Dead

George Monbiot, the Guardian

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Tuesday 28 February 2017 | Everything is possible. Nothing is possible. Nothing hurts any more, until the consequences crash through the screen. Immersed almost permanently in virtual worlds, we cannot check what we are told against tangible reality. Is it any wonder that we live in a post-truth era, when we are bereft of experience?

It is no longer rare to meet adults who have never swum except in a swimming pool, never slept except in a building, never run a mile or climbed a mountain, never been stung by a bee or a wasp, never broken a bone or needed stitches. Without a visceral knowledge of what it is to be hurt and healed, exhausted and resolute, freezing and ecstatic, we lose our reference points. We are separated from the world by a layer of glass. Climate change, distant wars, the erosion of democracy, resurgent fascism – in our temperature-controlled enclosures, all can be reduced to abstractions.

George Monbiot is an English writer, known for his environmental and political activism. He is the author of the bestselling books The Age of Consent: A Manifesto for a New World Order and Captive State: The Corporate Takeover of Britain.

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Chris Hedges | A Nation of the Walking DeadChris Hedges,  Truthdig  / Rise Up Times

  • This is more about mood modulation. Affect modulation. Using technologies to dampen anxieties and exit the world. We don’t just see it in Las Vegas. We see it in the subways every morning. The rise of all of these screen-based technologies and the little games that we’ve all become so absorbed in. What gamblers articulate is a desire to really lose a sense of self.
  • Related: We Are All Deplorables

Welcome to Donald Trump's Ignorant America

Arts and humanities get at the truth of things – so naturally Trump's administration plans to defund them.

Jesse Berney, Rolling Stone

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193093_600.jpghttp://media.cagle.com/226/2017/03/19/193093_600.jpg January 20, 2017 | The day before Donald Trump's inauguration as president of the United States – an actual event taking place in the universe we live in – news broke that his administration plans to eliminate the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities. And I wanted to scream.

 

This is Donald Trump's America: one where things like art and books and science and learning and thoughtful consideration of complicated problems are deemed worthless and tossed aside. This can't be surprising after the Trump we saw on the campaign trail, the man who never answered a question with a hint of intelligence or depth. In an interview this week, he couldn't name a single book he's reading. (Evergreene Digest Editor's Note: It has been widely reported his has a copy of Hitler's Mein Kampf on his nightstand.) He's appointed a secretary of education who wants to destroy public schools. He reportedly offered a notorious anti-vaccination activist a position leading a commission investigating vaccines. He called global warming a Chinese hoax.

Jesse Berney, Contributor, Rolling Stone

Full story … 

March Madness and money: Should American universities spend so much serious cash on sports?

http://media.salon.com/2017/03/march-madness-620x412.jpg

(Credit: Getty/Al Bello) 

  • Most college athletic programs are a financial burden to their schools. As higher ed costs increase, why keep them?
  • Related: From the Archives | The Problem with Subsidizing Huge Stadiums for Billionaire Team Owners

David Masciotra, Salon

Saturday, Mar 18, 2017 | A brilliant philosophy professor at the University of St. Francis — a small, liberal arts Catholic college in the Midwest — digressed during a lecture on ethics I attended as an undergraduate to ask the rhetorical question, “What do we spend our money on here?”

The students, most of us partially responsible for the existence of the “money” in the professor’s inquiry, stared blank-eyed. For any sane young person, college budgets, for good reason, do not rank high on the priorities of concern compared with the location of the next and nearest party. The professor, with a detectable tone of disgust, answered himself: “Sports and buildings.”

David Masciotra is the author of "Mellencamp: American Troubadour" (University of Kentucky Press), and is currently at work on a collection of personal essays for Agate Publishing.

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From the Archives | The Problem with Subsidizing Huge Stadiums for Billionaire Team Owners, Week Ending March 28, 2015, Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

  • The Twin Cities and the siren song of the positive economic impact of professional sports facilities.
  • The Problem with Subsidizing Huge Stadiums for Billionaire Team Owners
  • “Sports fans eat shit.” ― George Carlin, Brain Droppings
  • 8 New Items including:
    • Bill Moyers | Stadium Funding Deals Only Enrich the Plutocrats
    • The Problem with Subsidizing Huge Stadiums for Billionaire Team Owners
    • Minneapolis and the siren song of economic impact
    • Stop the stadium lease signings now!
    • Vikings stadium funding plan should be formally reviewed
    • Vikings Stadium: It’s a question of priorities
    • Special Project | The Business of Sport: Week Ending September 28, 2014
    • Triple Play: Sports, Politics & Greed

 

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