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Books, Literature & Ideas

Books, Literature & Ideas

Dead Miners and Ethically Dead Senators

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  • Here's the perfect cure for lawmakers' job grievances: Become coal miners for a while.
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  • Corporations scoff at workers' rights--even the right to come home from work alive
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  • In West Virginia, coal miner's slaughter
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Jim Hightower, Other Words

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Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Thomas Sklarski

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Some members of Congress complain that they have a really tough job. Also, they say their hard work is not appreciated by the public and that they're really not paid enough.

Well, not to worry, Congresspeople, for I have the perfect cure for your job grievances: Become coal miners for a while.
Talk about hard work, bad conditions, poor pay, and unappreciative bosses! Then there's that irritating thing about being killed on the job.

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Related:

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Corporations scoff at workers' rights--even the right to come home from work alive, Jim Hightower, Hightower Lowdown

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  • OSHA, the agency scorned by labor haters, has been meek and weak
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  • In West Virginia, coal miner's slaughter
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In West Virginia, coal miner's slaughter, Michael Winship, Salon

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  • Upper Big Branch's owners bought themselves virtual impunity with campaign contributions. The result was tragedy
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  • David Roberts of the environmental magazine Grist described Massey's president and CEO Don Blankenship as "the scariest polluter in the U.S. ...The guy is evil and I don't use that word lightly."
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  • The responsible capitalists: Will anyone fill their shoes?
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An Enemy of the State?

It’s interesting – this business of being an enemy of the state – to observe the variety of people who could so likewise be labeled: for example, quite a few nuns, especially, those who have done jail time.

Polly Mann,  WAMM Today

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The first time I realized that the government might so consider me was 1968 at the Democratic Convention in Chicago. It was a lovely not-too-warm summer day, and I was sitting in the bleachers in a amphitheater with two Roman Catholic priests I had walked into Grant Park with. As I recall – that was, after all, some 42 years ago – among the speakers at the rally were peace activist Dave Dellinger and authors Norman Mailer and Jean Genet. Someone had brought a pig upon the stage, comparing it to the Chicago police. Near the stage was a flag pole I had not noticed until my eyes were drawn to a short, skinny somewhat disheveled man in a white undershirt who was holding a rope attached to a solid red flag he was attaching to the pole.

Suddenly, almost out of nowhere, a bevy of Chicago police appeared, hitting people with their billy clubs as they charged through the crowd. People were running down the bleachers, hopping from level to level as the police began to indiscriminately hit people trying to leave the area. The priest next to me nudged me and silently pointed to a building about ten stories high. On the roof were several soldiers with their rifles trained on the crowd. I was astonished! What was this? Up to that time, I had never ever had a gun turned on me. As the priests began scrambling down the bouncing wooden bleachers, I followed them down and managed to arrive unscathed at my hotel.
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The No-Nonsense Guide to Religion ~ Symon Hill

Symon Hill's No-Nonsense Guide to Religion tries to explain what religion means, how we relate to it, how it was created and how it affects us culturally, politically and spiritually today.

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Reviewed in New Internationalist

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A balanced guide to religion, which analyses the cultural, social and political implications of religion globally. Religion is a term which is often used in the media and public life without any clarification.

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However, it is a word that encompasses hundreds of different beliefs. It is a loaded word that has a different meaning for each person. Religion can be seen as a source of war and peace, love and hate, dialogue and narrow-mindedness.

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Drawing on a wide range of sources, the No-Nonsense Guide to Religion does not just concentrate on the popular and well-established traditions, which normally over-emphasize powerful figures. It focuses too on the diversity within religions as well as the similarities between them.

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In Struggle With The American Mind

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  • Remember the warning from Friedrich Schiller of Germany: Mit der Dummheit kämpfen Götter selbst vergebens. — "With stupidity even the gods struggle in vain."
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  • How propaganda is used in the U.S. to control it citizens
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William Blum, Global Research

Since The Great Flood hit Pakistan in July ...
•    many millions have been displaced, evacuated, stranded or lost their homes; numerous roads, schools and health clinics destroyed
•    hundreds of villages washed away
•    millions of livestock have perished; for the rural poor something akin to a Western stock market crash that wipes out years of savings
•    countless farms decimated, including critical crops like corn; officials say the damage is in the hundreds of millions of dollars and it does not appear that Pakistan will recover within the next few years
•    infectious diseases are rising sharply
•    airplanes of the United States of America have flown over Pakistan and dropped bombs on dozens of occasions 1

I direct these remarks to readers who have to deal with Americans who turn into a stone wall upon hearing the United States accused of acting immorally; America, they are convinced, means well; our motives are noble. And if we do do something that looks bad, and the badness can't easily be covered up or explained away ... well, great powers have always done things like that, we're no worse than the other great powers of history, and a lot better than most. God bless America.

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Related:

How propaganda is used in the U.S. to control it citizens, Jack Finley, Veterans for Peace

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  • This video can provide a one and one-half hour of a Marketing 101 class on how rulers govern.
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  • The End of America? Naomi Wolf Thinks It Could Happen
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