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Series | 1968 Reduxed and Revisited: Look How Far We’ve Come (That Was Sarcasm) — Part 2 of 5

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  • The Series: As the country approaches the 50th anniversary of one of the most controversial, volatile, and important years in our country’s history, We the People of the United States of America find ourselves facing many of the same issues that led us to the balcony of the Lorraine Hotel, the bloodiest year of the Vietnam War, screams of “the whole world is watching” at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, the floor of the Ambassador Hotel, and Black fists being raised in the air at the Mexico Summer Olympics. So much has changed, true. We’ve come so far, but in a lot of ways, we’re right back where we started and even further behind.
  • Part 2: There will continue to be a vilification of certain demographics of U.S. and world citizens, but a new and surprising bad guy — excuse me, girl — and battleground may be making its appearance on the political stage.

John Fisher, Medium

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https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/800/1*C1dLOT0d33qrqjwyNY7HZg.jpeg Olympic medalists Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists in protest on the victory stand during the 1968 Olympics. Photo: Bettmann / Getty Images

Dec 19, 2017 | The year 1968 marks a decisive moment in history when the American people were split apart — maybe irreparably — along stratified political lines.

Enemies were created on both sides, and the war rages to this day. One person, however, played a major part in creating this political, cultural conflict, and a new battle may have already begun.
Political protest marred his first term in office. Police brutality was a major issue, as was gun control. Rallies on state university campuses turned violent, even deadly. Protests by athletes brought attention — unwelcome attention, in the minds of some — to the oppression and discrimination that still corrupted the United States even after a revolutionary period of hope and change.

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Previously in This Series:

Series | 1968 Reduxed and Revisited: Look How Far We’ve Come (That Was Sarcasm) — Part 1 of 5
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Series | 1968 Reduxed and Revisited: Look How Far We’ve Come (That Was Sarcasm) — Part 1 of 5

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Barry Goldwater. Photo: Newsroom

The Series: As the country approaches the 50th anniversary of one of the most controversial, volatile, and important years in our country’s history, We the People of the United States of America find ourselves facing many of the same issues that led us to the balcony of the Lorraine Hotel, the bloodiest year of the Vietnam War, screams of “the whole world is watching” at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, the floor of the Ambassador Hotel, and Black fists being raised in the air at the Mexico Summer Olympics. So much has changed, true. We’ve come so far, but in a lot of ways, we’re right back where we started and even further behind.
Part 1: Depending on how you feel about Donald Trump and his approach to politics, either the worst or best is yet to come. Over time, Goldwater’s message and methods became mainstream, and with time, so will Trump’s.

John Fisher, Medium

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Dec 12, 2017 | It was eight years after John F. Kennedy crushed Nixon’s presidential aspirations—for good, many people believed—in 1960. The campaign of another Republican hopeful, however, paved a path for Nixon to the White House and every other conservative victor since then.

His presidential campaign was one of the most controversial in American history.

Even his own Republican brethren feared the consequences of his political strategies and what were then considered extreme beliefs for the party’s future and for America.

https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/fit/c/100/100/1*-ADGrYIbqY29NX_74xROyw@2x.jpeg John Fisher: I’m sorry if you’re in a rush. Don’t let me hold you up or intervene or interrupt…

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Without Haiti, the United States Would, In Fact, Be a Shithole

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Police officers raise a Haitian flag during a memorial service honoring the victims of the 2010 earthquake, Port-au-Prince, January 12, 2018. ((AP Photo / Dieu Nalio Chery)

  • And some other things about the country that Donald Trump doesn’t know and doesn’t care to know.
  • Related: From the Archives | Special Report:The Clintons, “We Came, We Stole, Haitians Died”

Amy Wilentz, the Nation

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https://motherjones.com/files/images/haiti_main.gifJanuary 12, 2018 | t feels strange to me after so many years of thinking and writing about Haiti, to say nothing of simply being there, to have to rise to the country’s defense against a fool. But that fool is the president of the United States, so let’s start with first things first.

It goes without saying that Donald Trump knows nothing about history. But those who do have heard of the Louisiana Purchase, the incredible deal President Jefferson struck with France to buy the giant piece of land, 828,000 square miles of river and breadbasket, that stretches from what is now the Canadian border down to New Orleans and the delta. Without this territory, the United States would never have become a continental power nor, subsequently, a great global power. Jefferson got it at a bargain-basement price: $250 million, in current dollars, doubling the size of the country for less than 3 cents per acre.

Amy Wilentz, a Nation contributing editor, is the author of The Rainy Season: Haiti Since Duvalier and Farewell, Fred Voodoo: A Letter From Haiti, among other books.

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Related:

From the Archives | Special Report: The Clintons, “We Came, We Stole, Haitians Died” Glen Ford, Black Agenda Report 

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  • The Haitian people’s furious resistance to yet another fraudulent presidential election has scuttled U.S. plans to replace “Sweet Mickey” Martelly with another flunky named the “Banana Man.” The aborted fraud is a reminder that Secretary of State Clinton was an imperial bully who rigged the previous presidential election in Haiti and stole the country blind, along with her accomplice and husband, Bill. Those chickens may yet come home to roost.
  • “The discrediting of the elections would also reflect very badly on presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.”
  • “Hillary and Bill were the Bonnie and Clyde of Haiti.”

 

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Special Project | A Valentine's Day Holiday Reader

 

Martin Luther King and Love * Help us spread a message of love this Valentine’s Day * Choose Love: Don’t Ever Let Fear Turn You Against Your Playful Heart * Our duty on Earth: sharing, caring, helping those in need

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

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Part 1- Martin Luther King and Love, Martin Luther King, Delancy Place

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/MLK%20Speaks%20to%20a%20Crowd.jpg1961 | from A Testament of Hope: The Essential Writings and Speeches of Martin Luther King Jr., edited by James M. Washington. Dr. King, as Gandhi before him, had advocated nonviolent protest -- but believed it was not enough merely to be nonviolent. For King, there was a higher standard, and that was that you must love the person who harms you. In the following excerpt, King was speaking in 1961 to white liberals from the "Fellowship of the Concerned" at their annual meeting. He knew that many among them objected to student "sit-ins" and "freedom rides" and preferred a more gradual approach -- in part because of the savage beatings being inflicted on them -- and that his task was to persuade these veteran white liberals to see the student movement as a natural outgrowth of their own work and his own teachings.

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Part 2- Help us spread a message of love this Valentine’s Day,  Jocelyn Sherman, United Farm Workers

February 12, 2018 | All of us recoil at the growing immigrant bashing that is becoming all too commonplace. This prejudice violates the core values of the farm worker movement. So we are proud to join in the national Valentine’s Day campaign #ToImmigrantsWithLove.
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Part 3- Choose Love: Don’t Ever Let Fear Turn You Against Your Playful Heart, Doug “Uncola” Lynn, Straight Line Logic

January 10, 2018 | The words in the title of this piece are not my own. Believe it or not, these are the words of actor and comedian, Jim Carrey, from the end of the video below.  It inspired this essay.
A moving article by Doug “Uncola” Lynn at 
theburningplatform.com:

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Part 4- Our duty on Earth: sharing, caring, helping those in need, Rao Musunuru, Tampa Bay (FL) Times

November 14, 2017 | How prominent, powerful, important and great do you think you are, and for that matter I am?

The universe we both live in is big, very big. It is 14 billion years old, made up of about 100 billion galaxies (clusters of stars). Each single galaxy contains hundreds of billions of stars. Simply put, there are more stars in the universe than grains of sand on any beach.

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