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What We Need to Understand to Reform Corporate America

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  • It is time to step outside of the establishment. This means organizing groups, including political parties, that are independent of the corporate political machines that control the Republicans and Democrats.
  • It means carrying out acts of sustained civil disobedience. It means disruption.
  • An investment-banker-turned-law-professor and corporate transparency advocate shares his thoughts on what has to happen during the next four years.
  • Related: What Punch Pizza learned from raising its wages 
  • Part 1: Part 1: We Must Understand Corporate Power to Fight It
  • Part 2: What Voters Need to Know About Reforming Corporate America

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest



Part 1: We Must Understand Corporate Power to Fight It

  • It is time to step outside of the establishment. This means organizing groups, including political parties, that are independent of the corporate political machines that control the Republicans and Democrats.
  • It means carrying out acts of sustained civil disobedience. It means disruption.

Chris Hedges, Truthdig / OpEdNews

6/12/2016 | In the winter of 1941, a Jewish gravedigger from Chelmo, the western province of Poland, appeared in Warsaw and desperately sought a meeting with Jewish leaders.

He told them the Nazis were rounding up Jews, including the old, women and children, and forcing them into what looked like tightly sealed buses. The buses had the exhaust pipes redirected into the cabins. The Jews were killed with carbon monoxide. He had helped dig the mass graves for thousands of corpses until he escaped.

Chris Hedges, a weekly columnist for Truthdig, is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who has reported from more than 50 countries, specializing in American politics and society. 

Full story … 



Part 2: What Voters Need to Know About Reforming Corporate America

  • An investment-banker-turned-law-professor and corporate transparency advocate shares his thoughts on what has to happen during the next four years.
  • Related: What Punch Pizza learned from raising its wages 

Kathy Kiely, Moyers & Company 

http://dy00k1db5oznd.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/GettyImages-186338245-1280x720.jpgColumbia Law School professor Robert Jackson Jr. listens at a 2013 briefing on Capitol Hill as Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) urged the SEC to approve his proposed rule requiring corporations to disclose their political donations. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Robert J. Jackson Jr. is something of a double agent.

On one hand, with his multiple Ivy League degrees, stints at Oxford, the US Treasury, the now-defunct investment bank Bear Stearns and the blue-chip corporate law firm Wachtell Lipton, it would be hard to find a more perfectly pedigreed member of the nation’s financial elite.

But there is another part Jackson’s curriculum vitae. It’s the part that makes him apologize, more than once in the course of an hour-long conversation, for his “cushy job” as a professor at Columbia University’s law school, where he heads the program on corporate law and policy.

Kathy Kiely, a Washington, DC-based journalist and teacher, has reported and edited national politics for a number of news organizations, including USA TODAY, National Journal, The New York Daily News and The Houston Post. She been involved in the coverage of every presidential campaign since 1980.

Full story … 

Related:

What Punch Pizza learned from raising its wages, Ibrahim Hirsi, MinnPost

  • For Punch co-owners Soranno and John Puckett, however, the decision to raise pay wasn't political. It was simply a strategy to attract and retain quality workers who would, in turn, create a better experience for customers.
  • Related: Reframing the Minimum-Wage Debate

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What Punch Pizza learned from raising its wages

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Banner%20Corporate%20Accountability.jpg

  • For Punch co-owners Soranno and John Puckett, however, the decision to raise pay wasn't political. It was simply a strategy to attract and retain quality workers who would, in turn, create a better experience for customers.
  • Related: Reframing the Minimum-Wage Debate

Ibrahim Hirsi, MinnPost

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https://www.minnpost.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/article_detail/images/articles/PunchPizzaOven640.pngThree years after Punch Pizza raised its minimum wage for entry-level employees, sales and job applicants have increased significantly.  MinnPost photo by Ibrahim Hirsi

10/26/16 | In 2013, Punch Neapolitan Pizza took a step that many companies wouldn't — or couldn't — take: It increased the minimum wage for all its workers to $10 an hour.   

In January of the following year, Punch co-owner John Soranno found himself in Washington, D.C., where President Barack Obama introduced the restaurant chain to the nation during the State of the Union address and commended the entrepreneur for raising wages and calling on businesses across the country to follow suit.

http://prospect.org/sites/default/files/styles/longform_cover_image/public/ap955555990903_banner.jpeg?itok=wwDP-bNRStaff writer Ibrahim Hirsi covers workforce and immigration issues for MinnPost.

Full story … 

Related:

Reframing the Minimum-Wage Debate, David Howell, the American Prospect

Why “no job loss” is the wrong standard for setting the right wage floor.

 

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Section(s): 

Iceland Just Did The Exact Opposite of What the U.S. Does — It Found 9 Banksters Guilty in Historic Case

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  • We were wise enough not to follow the traditional prevailing orthodoxies of the Western financial world in the last 30 years. We introduced currency controls, we let the banks fail, we provided support for the people and didn’t introduce austerity measures like you’re seeing in Europe. --Icelandic President, Olafur Ragnar Grimmson
  • Related: Call out the corruption

Jay Syrmopoulos, Free Thought Project  / Activists Post 

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http://www.activistpost.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/bankers-guilty.jpgOctober 9, 2016 | On Thursday, Iceland’s Supreme Court found nine bankers guilty of market manipulation, affirming the conviction of the seven defendants found in a June 2015 decision by the Reykjavik District Court, and handing down a guilty verdict to two defendants previously acquitted in district court.

The Supreme Court decision found that “[b]y fully financing share purchases with no other surety than the shares themselves, the bankers were accused of giving a false and misleading impression of demand for Kaupthing shares by means of deception and pretense,” http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Stop%20TPP%20Image.jpgaccording to the Iceland Monitor.

Jay Syrmopoulos writes for TheFreeThoughtProject.com, where this article first appeared.

Full story … 

Related:

Call out the corruption, Evan, Fight For the Future

The TPP is so corrupt it’s a stretch to even call it a trade deal.

Series | A Living Earth Economy, Part 1 and Part 2

 

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  • What is the most important—yet neglected—issue in the political debate? Hint: It isn’t the ideal body weight of Miss Universe.
  • The $66 billion sale of Monsanto is yet another reminder of how corporations have colonized the world and subverted democracy. To regain our future, we must claim our right to popular sovereignty.
  • Part 1: The Elephant in the Room: What Trump, Clinton, and Even Stein Are Missing
  • Part 2: We Never Voted for Corporate Rule

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

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Part 1: The Elephant in the Room: What Trump, Clinton, and Even Stein Are Missing

What is the most important—yet neglected—issue in the political debate? Hint: It isn’t the ideal body weight of Miss Universe.

David Korten, Yes! Magazine

http://www.yesmagazine.org/new-economy/the-elephant-in-the-room-what-trump-clinton-and-even-stein-wont-mention-20161005/trump-and-clinton-money.gif/imageOct 05, 2016 | In this most bizarre of presidential elections, no one is talking about one of the biggest—if not the biggest—issues of our time. Namely, the global power imbalance between corporations and governments.

Not Donald Trump, as he obsesses over the weight of a long-past Miss Universe. Not Hillary Clinton, despite her many substantive proposals that the media largely ignores. Not even Jill Stein, although she offers many proposals for moving power to the people at the national level.

David Korten wrote this article for Yes! Magazine as part of his column on “A Living Earth Economy.” David is co-founder and board chair of Yes! Magazine, president of the Living Economies Forum, co-chair of the New Economy Working Group, a member of the Club of Rome, and the author of influential books, including When Corporations Rule the World and Change the Story, Change the Future: A Living Economy for a Living Earth.

Full story … 



 

Part 2: We Never Voted for Corporate Rule

The $66 billion sale of Monsanto is yet another reminder of how corporations have colonized the world and subverted democracy. To regain our future, we must claim our right to popular sovereignty.

http://www.yesmagazine.org/people-power/we-never-voted-for-corporate-rule-20161019/corporate-rule-korten.gif/imageIllustration by kmlmtz66/ iStock.

David Korten, Yes! Magazine 

Oct 19, 2016 | In Part One, I argued that a healthy society requires that governments be accountable to the people for the well-being of all, and that corporations be accountable to democratic governments.

Last week, Bayer, a transnational drug and pesticide company, secured funding for its $66 billion offer to acquire Monsanto, the world’s largest producer of agricultural seeds. This follows the announced $130 billion merger of chemical giants Dow and DuPont, and ChemChina’s proposed $43 billion purchase of the seed and pesticide firm Syngenta.

David Korten wrote this article for Yes! Magazine as part of his column on “A Living Earth Economy.” David is co-founder and board chair of Yes! Magazine, president of the Living Economies Forum, co-chair of the New Economy Working Group, a member of the Club of Rome, and the author of influential books, including When Corporations Rule the World and Change the Story, Change the Future: A Living Economy for a Living Earth.

Full story … 

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