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Legendary bluesman Pinetop Perkins dead at 97

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  • Grammy winner died of cardiac arrest, manager says
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  • "He was one of the last great Mississippi Bluesmen. He had such a distinctive voice, and he sure could play the piano. He will be missed not only by me, but by lovers of music all over the world," fellow great bluesman B.B. King said in an emailed statement.
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Jim Verturno, Associated Press/MSNBC

This article is made possible with the generous contributions of readers like you. Thank you!

In this Oct. 11, 2009 file photo, Grammy winning blues pianist Joe Willie "Pinetop" Perkins motions a "thumbs up" gesture during the annual festival at Hopson Plantation in Clarksdale, Miss. Perkins, one of the last old-school bluesmen and oldest Grammy winner, died at his home of cardiac arrest Monday, March 21, 2011, his manager said. He was 97. (AP Photo - Rogelio V. Solis)

In 1969 in Buffalo, N.Y., a wiry, middle-aged chain smoker sat in on piano during a jam session and earned a spot in the band of legendary bluesman Muddy Waters.

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By then, Pinetop Perkins had already performed with the likes of Sonny Boy Williamson and slide guitarist Robert Nighthawk. The old school bluesman with the aggressive keyboard style and gravelly voice had played the rickety bars among the cotton fields of the Mississippi Delta, and toured with rock pioneer Ike Turner in the 1950s.

"Muddy came by, and heard him jamming, and he liked what he heard. The rest is history," said Willie "Big Eyes" Smith, who was a drummer in the band.

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American as Curry Pie

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  • March 17 — April 10, 2011
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  • Written and performed by Aamera Siddiqui
Directed by Meena Natarajan and Suzy Messerole
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Great American History Theatre

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Thanks to Evergreene Digest reader Pam Curley for this contribution.

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Photo by Lauren B. Photography.

We’ve all felt like we didn’t fit in, whether we grew up in our hometown or moved to a new country when we were 6. For Aamera Siddiqui, growing up as an immigrant in the United States was a balancing act between her Indian heritage and her American surroundings. Aamera’s world consisted of one country inside the four walls of her family’s home and another country outside those walls. Curried peas and hot dogs, Catholic school uniforms and colorful saris, Urdu and English all blended and bounced off one another to shape Aamera’s identity.


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Told with honesty and humor, American as Curry Pie is one woman’s story about immigration, assimilation, and discovering what it means to be an American.
If you are the least bit interested in family dynamics, acceptance of differences, search for personal freedom, politics, religion, the struggles of the immigrant population, this play if for you!

"The audience was laughing one minute and crying the next." -- Pam Curley

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Schickel on Scorsese

From the book “Conversations With Scorsese” by Richard Schickel. Copyright © 2011 by Richard Schickel. Reprinted with the permission of Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Random House Inc.

Richard Schickel, TruthDig

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If you like reading this article, consider contributing a cuppa jove to Evergreene Digest--using the donation button above—so we can bring you more just like it.

Every time we met, we vowed to try to keep our conversations on a rough chronological track. Every time we failed to do so. He’s as breathless and excitable off camera as he is on. At some point every night we would just give up on chronology and go with whatever flow had arisen out of our exchanges. These resulted in quite amazing transcripts—full of repetitions and false starts, to be sure, but also full of fascinating autobiography and astonishing detail about the choices he has made over the course of a career that now extends well over forty years. These were never easy to edit, but they were never tiresome, either.

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Like virtually every good director I’ve ever known, Marty is not entirely comfortable at explaining his motives, why he may opt for one project over another—or, for that matter, one shot or edit over another. Movie directors are as instinctive as any other kind of artist except that they have to marshal and control far more numerous and often more recalcitrant collaborators than someone working alone—a writer or painter, say. There is, as well, something hypnotic and addictive in the filmmaking process, something that drives its practitioners to immerse themselves in the work to the exclusion of all else. And it’s quite a long process. Preproduction, production, and postproduction cannot take less than six months. Sometimes, as in the case of a difficult project like The Last Temptation of Christ or Gangs of New York, it can take years, decades. You have no choice but to embrace this addiction—there is no twelve-step program that can cure you—else your picture will fail and eventually your career will fail as well.

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Palestine Film Festival in Minneapolis

April 8-10. Mark your calendars & spread the word!

Wael Khouli

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Lydia Howell

This article is made possible with the generous contributions of readers like you. Thank you!

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The Minnesota Chapter of the American Association For Palestinian Equal Rights (AAPER) is excited to present to you the first Palestine Film Festival in Minneapolis. The Saint Anthony Main Theater will be hosting the festival April 8-10. The tickets are going to be completely FREE!

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We will have two short documentaries on the first day, and one motion picture on the second and third days. The trailers for the two motion pictures are http://www.imdb.com/video/imdb/vi1726744089/ and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SdEVH1Ec2-4

AAPER is organizing 25 similar film festivals across the US. All of them will be showing the same award winning movies for free. This is part of
the organization's push to raise awareness regarding Palestinian rights.

Since the tickets are going to be free, we are relying on sponsorships andcontributions to fund the event. Sponsors will be able to buy an ad in the
festival program. Other promotion packages are also available. If you have any questions or interested in sponsorship,  please contact  the festival
main organizer Miyan Nagib. His e-mail is nagib002@umn.edu; his phone number 952-212-0749.

This link link will take you to the Facebook page.

Thanks to all of you for you support and we hope to see you at the festival.

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Summary | Intolerance, Hate, Intimidation, Fear-mongering, Violence, Incivility, and Ignorance Move Mainstream: Week of March 6

3 New Items including:

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  • The South Dakota Bill That Could Legitimize Murder of Abortion Providers
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  • Over 1,000 hate groups in America
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David Culver, ed., Evergreene Digest

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Chan Lowe

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The South Dakota Bill That Could Legitimize Murder of Abortion Providers, Jodi JacobsonRH Reality Check
If you had any doubt that we are moving toward a hate-filled, vigilante society, you now have an unequivocal answer.

Over 1,000 hate groups in America, Morris Dees, Southern Poverty Law Center

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  • Live Webcast on Year in Hate and Extremism, March 2, Wed., 1 pm ET
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  • Join SPLC President Richard Cohen and SPLC's Intelligence Project Director Mark Potok for a live webcast to discuss the new findings. Register Today
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"Comic Relief": Sarah Palin on Egypt, Robert Dreyfuss, Nation Magazine

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Robert Dreyfuss begins, "Sarah Palin, in her first comments on Egypt, managed to make no sense at all. None. I especially liked her 'not, not real enthused about what it is that that's being done [in DC].' Here's the full quote, which sounds like it was written by Miss South Carolina, speaking for all 'US Americans' ..."

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Oscar Nominee Sara Nesson Tells One Soldier's Epic Journey

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  • From Cheerleader to Wounded Vet
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  • I think the only way people are going to understand what soldiers are going through is to hear them, to see their struggles.
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Joshua Kors, Huffington Post

Sara Nesson jokes that she set out to make a movie about paper. The director ended up with an intimate, heartbreaking film about Sergeant Robynn Murray, a cheerleader and National Merit Scholar who graduated high school, then joined the Army. Murray was featured on the cover of the Army's official magazine, transformed into a poster girl for the ideal female soldier. After a tour manning a machine gun and examining dead civilians, Murray returned home a physical and emotional wreck.

The sergeant sought healing on Martha's Vineyard at the Combat Paper Project, where wounded soldiers cut up their uniforms and slice their ribbons and process them into paper, which they use to make art. Nesson was there making a documentary about the project. When she met Murray, she shifted gears and began telling the sergeant's story.

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John Rash: 'King's Speech' -- not just words, but a celebration of human decency

George VI was a reluctant ruler because he stuttered. He became a model of moral rectitude.

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John Rash, Minneapolis Star Tribune | MN

This article is made possible with the generous contributions of readers like you. Thank you!

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King George VI Courtesy, Creative Commons

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Some Academy Award Best Pictures connect because their stories explore relatively current events, such as last year’s “Hurt Locker,” about a bomb-detonation squad in Iraq.

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Some, like “Gone with the Wind,” simply take us back in time.

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This year’s winner, “The King’s Speech,” is notable because it’s a period piece with remarkable resonance today.

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Green Bay Packers Sound Off Against Gov. Scott 'Hosni' Walker

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  • As Wisconsin’s public workers fight to keep their wages and bargaining rights, they’re joined by others involved in a labor struggle: their Super Bowl champion neighbors.
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  • Natl Basketball Assoc Players' Assoc (NBAPA) Exec. Director Billy Hunter & Milwaukee Buck Keyon Dooling Stand w/ Wisconsin Workers
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  • Fighting austerity is not an Egyptian issue or a Middle Eastern issue—it’s a political reality of the 21st century world.
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Dave Zirin, Nation Magazine/Yes! Magazine

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Lydia Howell

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Protesters rally against the governor's proposal to end bargaining rights for Wisconsin's public workers. Photo by Jessie Reeder.

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Less than two weeks ago (Feb 6) , the Green Bay Packers—the only fan-owned, non-profit franchise in major American sports—won the Super Bowl, bringing the Lombardi trophy back to Wisconsin. But now, past and present members of the “People’s Team” are girding up for one more fight and this time, it’s against their own governor, Scott Walker.

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Walker, after the Super Bowl victory, bathed himself sensuously in the team’s triumph, declaring at a public ceremony that February was now Packers Month. He oozed praise for the franchise named in honor of the state's packing workers. But just days later, the governor offered cutbacks, contempt, and even the threat of violence for actual state workers.

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Fighting austerity is not an Egyptian issue or a Middle Eastern issue—it’s a political reality of the 21st century world.

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Natl Basketball Assoc Players' Assoc (NBAPA) Exec. Director Billy Hunter & Milwaukee Buck Keyon Dooling Stand w/ Wisconsin Workers, Dave Zirin, Nation Magazine
Unions across the country are standing with the workers of Wisconsin against the unprecedented attacks by Governor Scott Walker. Count the National Basketball Association's Player's Association among their ranks. The NBAPA has been threatened with layoffs, contraction and steep cuts in pay and benefits in their current collective bargaining negotiations with NBA commissioner David Stern and the assorted team owners. Considering that no one ever bought a ticket to look at Mark Cuban, a Maloof brother or (shudder) Donald Sterling, their's is a struggle worthy of support.

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