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Patrick Chappatte | The Tea Party / CagleCartoons.com

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John Lennon Remembered: 10/9/40 – 12/8/80

Audio clips from Jonathan Cott's 1980 interview with Lennon, and video, photos, playlists and more

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Rolling Stone/Reader Supported News

On December 8, 1980, John Lennon was murdered outside of his New York apartment building by a deranged fan. Three days before John Lennon was killed, Jonathan Cott spent hours interviewing him for a planned cover story. The complete Q&A, which is running in the new issue of Rolling Stone — available on stands, as well as in the online archives — has never been published before now. On this page you can find our web-exclusive companion coverage to the piece — everything from audio clips from the interview to a gallery of Lennon and Ono’s years in New York.

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Stories
•    On John Lennon's historic final interview: a nine-hour discussion with Rolling Stone that took place three days before he died
•    Jann S. Wenner on the interview and Lennon's enduring legacy

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Audio From Jonathan Cott's Interview
•    Lennon explains to Jonathan Cott why he didn't record for five years, describes his weakness as a child and more
•    Download eighteen minutes of Cott's interview with Lennon, in which he speaks candidly about everything from a prized guitar to his newfound perspective at age 40

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In Defense of the Public

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  • What does it say about our world that the most basic of human comforts—a park, a fire, a place to sit—are assumed to be inaccessible to the average person?
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  • We must not let the commons be privatized.
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  • The Myopic Selfishness of Libertarians
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Eve Ewing, In These Times

At a time when corporations are buying up elections – not to mention the 24-hour-news cycle – help ensure that a source for truly independent journalism lives on. Support Evergreene Digest  today by using the donation button in the above right-hand corner.

At the public eye: Citizens check out a 30-foot-tall sculpture by artist Tony Tasset in Pritzker Park on July 7, in Chicago, IL.

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On a recent weekend evening graced with unseasonably warm weather, I invited a few friends and family members to spend the twilight hours at the public park near where I live on the south side of Chicago. The park, situated on a tiny promontory that juts into Lake Michigan, is well-used thanks to its beautiful views of the skyline and proximity to the lakefront bicycle path. We brought a picnic dinner and sat on stone benches encircling a fire pit, where we built a small fire and enjoyed the warmth, light and camaraderie offered by the makeshift hearth.

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Fires were a catalytic invention in human evolution. Not only did they allow us the physiological benefits of cooked food, but they also brought us together in a shared reliance on common resources, laying the foundation for cooperative social structures. Whenever I sit before a fire, I imagine what our earliest ancestors must have felt as the heat drew them close, providing refuge from the threats of the night in those times before man was the conqueror of all he saw.

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The Myopic Selfishness of Libertarians, David Horsey, Seattle Post-Intelligencer | WA
One way or another, if the problems of a city, a state or a nation are neglected, those problems will spread and eventually end up on everyone's doorstep. Forget empathy, generosity, humanitarianism or Christian charity. Be selfish, but still grasp this hard truth: Taxes are anarchy insurance, the fee we pay to guarantee we don't lose it all.

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Vicarious violence a threat? Yes

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  • It was all so normal, including the scorecard at the end, where the one who had the most "kills" (planes shot down) and "deaths" (victims of war) was the winner. The kids were learning how to win, through death, but with no threat to themselves. Death was casual, meted out on somebody else, tallied on a score sheet on a television screen.
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  • Video games are more troubling than the comic books of yesteryear.
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Dick Bernard, Minneapolis Star Tribune | MN

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The headline writer for George Will's Nov 28 column on violent video games ("There's a moral threat to the youths of America!") gave it this subhead: "Today, it's video games. In another era, it was comic books. So, pass a law? Pshaw."

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Oh, were it only so easy to dismiss a serious societal problem.

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Will is exactly one year younger than I am; he and I come from the same generation. But here's another perspective, based on an experience that is doubtless replayed tens of millions of times every day across our nation.

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"Men of a Certain Age": Cool is overrated

TNT's moving, understated drama focuses on the disappointments and the sweetness of growing old among old friends

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Heather Havrilesky, Salon

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At a time when corporations are buying up elections – not to mention the 24-hour-news cycle – help ensure that a source for truly independent journalism lives on. Support Evergreene Digest  today by using the donation button in the above right-hand corner.

Scott Bakula, Andre Braugher and Ray Romano in "Men of a Certain Age" / TNT

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The older you get, the less cool you are. The less cool you are, the nicer you are. This is why old people are so nice to each other.

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When we're young, we think old people are nice to each other because they're fake. I was walking the dogs with my 14-year-old stepson yesterday and we passed a couple on the sidewalk. "Hi, how are you?" the man said. "Great, how are you?" I replied.

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"That was weird," my stepson said. "It's like he says the same thing to everyone."

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"OK, have a great weekend!" I replied.

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Living with less, on purpose

A growing number of Americans are not only buying fewer things, but getting rid of those they don't need, in pursuit of greater happiness.

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Kristin Tillotson, Minneapolis Star Tribune | MN

The Swindlehurst family / Tom Wallace, Star Tribune

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David, Christy and Noah Swindlehurst are practicing new math at their Eden Prairie town home -- minimal addition, maximum subtraction.

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While the tradition for most young American families is to acquire more, the Swindlehursts are determined to get rid of as much stuff as they can spare.

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"We just worked our way through four dressers, and now we're down to two," Christy said, as David reluctantly parted with some T-shirts that held sentimental value.

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As 10-year-old Noah sat on an area rug, surrounded by toys and sports equipment he was giving away, his dad joked, "If you're on the rug, you're gone."

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The Swindlehursts are part of a growing national movement of personal downsizers, people who are simplifying their lives -- and spending habits -- by paring down their possessions and resisting the urge to buy more.

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Zinn's 'People's History' Masterwork Hits the History Channel

Don't miss Howard Zinn's 'Voices of a People's History' debut on the History Channel on December 13th.

Dave Zirin,  AlterNet

At a time when corporations are buying up elections – not to mention the 24-hour-news cycle – help ensure that a source for truly independent journalism lives on. Support Evergreene Digest  today by using the donation button in the above right-hand corner.

On December 13th, a date I've basically had tattooed on my arm like the guy from Memento, The People Speak finally makes its debut on the History Channel. This is more than just must-see-TV. It is nothing less than the life's work of "people's historian" Howard Zinn brought to life by some of the most talented actors, musicians, and poets in the country. Howard Zinn and his partner Anthony Arnove chose the most stirring political passages in Zinn's classic A People's History of the United States, creating a written anthology called Voices of a People's History of the United States. Those "voices" have now been fully resurrected by a collection of performers ranging from Matt Damon to hip hop artist Lupe Fiasco to poet Staceyann Chin.

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The People Speak also showcases John Legend reading the words of Muhammad Ali, Kerry Washington as Sojourner Truth, David Strathairn's take on the soaring oratory of Eugene Debs, and Morgan Freeman as Frederick Douglass asking, "What is the 4th of July to the American Slave?" There are also the words of women factory workers read by Marisa Tomei, rebellious farmers personified by Viggo Mortensen, and escaped slaves voiced by Benjamin Bratt.

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Summary | Intolerance, Hate, Intimidation, Fear-mongering, Violence, Incivility, and Ignorance Move Mainstream: Week of November 28

5 New Items including:

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  • Rush Limbaugh: Obama should have "TSA grope" his 9-year old daughter
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  • Rand Paul Compared Obama's Rise To Power To Hitler's In 2009
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David Culver, ed., Evergreene Digest

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John Darkow

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Rush Limbaugh: Obama should have "TSA grope" his 9-year old daughter, karoli, Crooks & Liars
Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Thomas Sklarski

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  • Had these procedures been in effect when Bush was in office, Rush most certainly would have extolled their value and reminded us all that it was in the name of "keeping us safe".
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  • In Rushbo classic hyperbole, he instead suggests that the president should have his daughter "groped" by the TSA so he can show everyone how safe it is.
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Christian Activist Bryan Fischer Blasts 'Feminized' Medal Of Honor, Politics Daily
"When we think of heroism in battle, we used the think of our boys storming the beaches of Normandy under withering fire, climbing the cliffs of Pointe du Hoc while enemy soldiers fired straight down on them, and tossing grenades into pill boxes to take out gun emplacements," wrote Fischer, director of issue analysis for the AFA, a longtime lobby on the Christian right. "That kind of heroism has apparently become passé when it comes to awarding the Medal of Honor. We now award it only for preventing casualties, not for inflicting them."

Rand Paul Compared Obama's Rise To Power To Hitler's In 2009, Nick Wing, Huffington Post
Soon-to-be-Kentucky Senator Rand Paul once appeared to express anxiety that the state of affairs in America was opening a path for President Obama to grow into a Hitler-like leader who would snatch up civil liberties in the name of security.

They served us. We failed them, Rubén Rosario, St. Paul Pioneer Press | MN
Thousands of ground zero workers continue to suffer — and die — from illnesses caused by the site's toxic air, and our government has left them high and dry.

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Limbaugh Goes On War Path Against Native Americans, Huffington Post
If the Christmas shopping season can start before Thanksgiving, so can "bah humbug" season. Rush Limbaugh tried to rain on Barack Obama's Thanksgiving Day parade.

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