You are here

Books & Liturature

Look, a Deficit!: How NPR Distracts You From Issues That Will Actually Affect Your Life

Liberal%20Media%20Banner%20.jpg

The reason the Fed raises interest rates is to slow the economy and keep people from getting jobs. This will prevent the labor market from tightening, which will prevent workers from having enough bargaining power to get pay increases. In that case, the bulk of the gains from economic growth will continue to go to those at the top end of the income distribution.

Dean Baker, Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR)

100DollarBills.jpgNPR warns listeners that “the federal government is still adding to its overall debt”–even though the economy could actually benefit from increased deficit spending. (photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

May 28, 2015 | Billionaire Pete Peterson is spending lots of money to get people to worry about the debt and deficits, and National Public Radio is doing its part to try to promote Peterson’s cause with a Morning Edition piece that began by telling people that the next president “will have to wrestle with the federal debt.”

This is not true, but Peterson apparently hopes that he can distract the public from the factors that will affect their lives, most importantly the upward redistribution of income, and obsess on the country’s relatively small deficit. (A larger deficit right now would actually promote growth and employment.)

Economist Dean Baker is co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, DC. A version of this post originally appeared on CEPR’s blog Beat the Press (5/28/15).

Full story … 

Series | Considering the Problem of Race in America, Part 7: How Liberalism and Racism Are Wed

heFaceOfJustice.jpeg?itok=7V5AyJvd

This is the seventh in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for The Stone. This week’s conversation is with Falguni A. Sheth, an associate professor of philosophy and political theory at Hampshire College. She is the author of Toward a Political Philosophy of Race.” — George Yancy

George Yancy and Falguni A. Sheth, The Stone / New York Times

twitter-4-512.png Follow Evergreene Digest on Twitter.

Falguni A. ShethFalguni-Sheth-articleInline.jpg

February 27, 2015   | George Yancy: Can you discuss your own view of your “racial” identity and how that identity is linked to your critical explorations into the philosophical and political significance of race?

Falguni A. Sheth: Until 2001, I thought of my identity in terms of ethnicity rather than race. I was an immigrant, and in the American imaginary, immigrants were rarely discussed in terms of race. After September 11, 2001, I tried to reconcile what I saw as the profound racist treatment of people (often Arabs and South Asians) who were perceived as Muslim, with a politically neutral understanding of “racial identity,” but it didn’t work. That’s when I began to explore race as a critical category of political philosophy, and as a product of political institutions. The biggest surprise was my coming to understand that “liberalism” and systematic racism were not antithetical, but inherently compatible, and that systemic racism was even necessary to liberalism. Soon after, I read Charles Mills’s “The Racial Contract,” which supported that view.

G.Y.: In what ways do you see liberalism and systemic racism as complementary?

The Stone is a forum for contemporary philosophers and other thinkers on issues both timely and timeless.

George Yancy is a professor of philosophy at Duquesne University. He has written, edited and co-edited numerous books, including “Black Bodies, White Gazes,” “Look, a White!” and “Pursuing Trayvon Martin,” co-edited with Janine Jones.

Full story … 

Related:

Part 6: Philosophy’s Lost Body and Soul

This is the sixth in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for the Stone. This week’s conversation is with Linda Martín Alcoff, a professor of philosophy at Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate Center. She was the president of the American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division, for 2012-13. She is the author of “Visible Identities: Race, Gender, and the Self.” 

Part 5: What’s Wrong With ‘All Lives Matter’?

This is the fifth in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for the Stone. This week’s conversation is with Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor in the department of comparative literature and the program of critical theory at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of numerous influential books, including “Dispossession: The Performative in the Political,” which she co-authored with Athena Athanasiou. She will publish a book on public assemblies with Harvard University Press this year.

Part 4: Black Lives: Between Grief and Action

This is the fourth in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for the Stone. This week’s conversation is with Joy James, a political philosopher who is a professor of the humanities and political science at Williams College.  She is the author of “Seeking the Beloved Community: A Feminist Race Reader.” 

Part 3: White Anxiety and the Futility of Black Hope

This is the third in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for the Stone. This week’s conversation is with Shannon Sullivan, a professor in the department of philosophy at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. She is the author of “Good White People: The Problem with Middle-Class White Anti-Racism.

Part 2: Lost in Rawlsland

This week’s conversation is with Charles Mills, the John Evans Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy at Northwestern University and the author of several books, including the influential 1997 work “The Racial Contract.”

Part 1: What ‘White Privilege’ Really Means

This week’s conversation is with Naomi Zack, a professor of philosophy at the University of Oregon and the author of “The Ethics and Mores of Race: Equality After the History of Philosophy.”

Vacationing Swedish Police officers show us how to handle a violent confrontation.

  • Handling things well—even in bad situations--can be done, but you have to wanna!
  • Watch the two minute clip.
  • A New Approach to Policing Focuses on Strengthening Communities.

Walter Einenkel, Daily Kos

twitter-4-512.pngNow you can follow Evergreene Digest on Twitter.

Screen_Shot_2015-04-24_at_12.46.39_PM.png?1429904885Swedish cops break up fight on subway 6 Train. Just take it easy. attribution: youtube/screengrab 

Fri Apr 24, 2015 | Four Swedish police officers, riding on New York City's 6 train, had to go back to work briefly, in order to subdue two men who were fighting.

While on their way to watch “Les Miserables,” two homeless men started fighting on an uptown 6 train in the middle of rush hour, DNAinfo reports.  Witnesses told the news site that the train’s conductor was aware of the fight and remained in the Bleecker Street station, asking over the loudspeakers if there were any police officers on board.

“They were lying on the floor, one on top of the other,” said Stockholm officer Makrus Åsberg, 25.  “We got to make sure that nobody gets hurt . . . try to calm them down without hurting them.

Walter Einenkel: Daily Kos Staff

Full story … 

Related:

A New Approach to Policing Focuses on Strengthening Communities, Nathalie Baptiste, American Prospect

Rights%20%26%20Liberties%20Banner.jpg

  • Without progressive solutions to the tension between law enforcement and people of color, every city is one incident away from being the next Baltimore.
  • “While the CVS burned,” said Ifill, “no one stopped to ask why there was no grocery store in the neighborhood.” --NAACP Legal Defense Fund Sherrilyn Ifill
  • “If we don’t rethink the way police officers operate in our communities, we will always think that we have to police our way out of crime.” --Jeffrey Blackwell, chief of Cincinnati’s police department
  • 1968 and the Invention of the American Police State

Series | They Know Everything About You, Part 1: Robert Scheer and Chris Hedges on the Military-Industrial-Intelligence Complex

Rights%20%26%20Liberties%20Banner.jpg

In the first part of a wide-ranging, seven-part discussion about Truthdig Editor-in-Chief Robert Scheer’s new book, They Know Everything About You: How Data-Collecting Corporations and Snooping Government Agencies are Destroying Democracy,” Scheer says the U.S. government and private industry have merged to turn the Internet into a massive machine for simultaneously selling to and spying on Americans.

Alexander Reed Kelly, Truthdig

Scheer%2C%20Hedges%20%7C%20They%20Know%20...%20Part%201.jpgMay 13, 2015 | Chris Hedges, Journalist and Author: Hi. I’m Chris Hedges. Welcome to The Real News.

I’m speaking with Robert Scheer, one of the premier journalists, certainly one of the journalists I admire most in the United States, the editor of Truthdig. And I write a column for Truthdig for Bob. And we’re talking about his new book, They Know Everything About You: How Data-Collecting Corporations and Snooping Government Agencies Are Destroying Democracy, which is a brilliant explication of the security and surveillance apparatus and the fusion of government and corporate power into every aspect of our lives.

And let’s begin a little bit about how this started, how it began.

Robert Scheer, Journalist and Author: Well, I think the surveillance state has been with us in one form or another. You just go watch the movie Selma and look at what was done to Martin Luther King.

Alexander Reed Kelly is the Assistant Editor of Truthdig.

Full story … 

The result of the breakdown of the white biker family

  • Nine were killed in a shootout in Texas, but no one asks if absent fathers are to blame.
  • #WacoThugs perfectly encapsulates what's wrong with response to Waco shooting
  • B.B. King and our blatant racial revisionism: The South still denies the roots of "America's music"

Joanna Rothkopf, Salon 

waco-shooting.jpeg17-620x412.jpgThis combination of booking photos provided by the McLennan County Sheriff's office shows people arrested during the motorcycle gang related shooting at the Twin Peaks restaurant in Waco, Texas on Sunday, May 17, 2015. Top row from left; Ray Allen, Brian Brincks, Salvador Campos, Richard Cantu and David Cepeda. Middle row from left; Bohar Crump, James David, James Devoll, Matthew Folse and Juan Garcia. Bottom row from left; Mario Gonzalez, James Gray, Jim Harris, Michael Herring and Tommy Jennings. (McLennan County Sheriff's Office via AP)(Credit: AP)

Tuesday, May 19, 2015 | On Sunday, two rival biker gangs engaged in a massive shootout outside a Twin Peaks restaurant in Waco, Tx. resulting in nine deaths and at least 170 arrests. Although the media had become accustomed to covering protests in Ferguson and Baltimore using descriptors like “thug” and “riot,” they chose to use less loaded words like “melee” and “scuffle” to depict the events in Waco. Police response in Waco was also dramatically less aggressive than it was in Ferguson and Baltimore.

The country noticed these disparities and took to Twitter using the hashtag #WacoThugs to emphasize some of the most blatant issues of racial bias in coverage and policing. 

Here are some of the best.

Joanna Rothkopf is an assistant editor at Salon, focusing on science, health and society.

Full story … 

Related:



Subscribe%20logo.jpgTo stay on top of important articles like these, sign up here to receive the latest updates from all reader supported Evergreene Digest.



B.B. King and our blatant racial revisionism: The South still denies the roots of "America's music" Tony Fletcher, Salon

Southern states celebrating "America's music" should remember the direct line between our original sin & the blues.

 

Inside the Billion-Dollar Brain: 3 Attitudes That Explain Their Selfish Behavior

  • Why the rich don't care about jobs for the rest of us.
  • “The buck stops nowhere”: Meet the corrupt new elite running (and ruining) our economy
  • A Wealthy Capitalist on Why Money Doesn’t Trickle Down

Paul BuchheitAlterNet

ffee%20%26%20Paper%20Graphic.jpgJournalism with real independence and integrity is a rare thing. All reader supported Evergreene Digest relies - exclusively!- on reader donations. Click on the donation button above to make a contribution and support our work.

Money%20in%20Tight%20Fist.jpgMay 10, 2015 | Many of us wonder what possible reason could exist for the failure to invest in American infrastructure, to create millions of jobs as a result, and to help everyone in the long run. Analysis reveals personality traits and beliefs and misconceptions that might account for such behavior. Here's a look inside the billion-dollar brain: 


1. It's All About Me 

Several 
studies by Paul Piff and his colleagues have revealed that upper-class individuals tend to be narcissistic, with a clear sense of entitlement. Worse yet, they believe their talents and attributes - genius, even - have earned them a rightful position of status over everyone else. 

Paul Buchheit is a college teacher, a writer for progressive publications, an active member of US Uncut Chicago, founder and developer of social justice and educational websites (UsAgainstGreed.org, RappingHistory.org), and the editor and main author of "American Wars: Illusions and Realities" (Clarity Press).

Full story … 

Related:

“The buck stops nowhere”: Meet the corrupt new elite running (and ruining) our economy, Lynn Stuart Parramore, AlterNet

  • Talking about old systems of power and corruption doesn't begin to capture new realities.
  • "Unaccountable" author Janine Wedel takes on Larry Summers, Citigroup and the sins of the Clinton administration.
  • They won, we lost: How corruption became America’s national pastime
  • George Carlin "The American Dream" 

###

263fe7d0f0e40c0321b799a4dbd97ae1.portrait.jpgA Wealthy Capitalist on Why Money Doesn’t Trickle Down, Nick Hanauer, YES! Magazine

  • Nick Hanauer, venture capitalist and self-described "plutocrat," says a healthy economy and an effective democracy depend on a thriving middle class of workers.
  • Next Time Someone Argues For 'Trickle-Down' Economics, Show Them This


 

Special Project | President Obama, Change we can believe in? Week Ending May 23, 2015

Politics%20Banner.jpg

  • "We are the ones we've been waiting for. We are the change that we seek." --Barack Obama
  • 8 New Items including:
    • Obama, Bush and Carson believe this nonsense?
    • The Liberal Apologies for Obama’s Ugly Reign
    • The Obama administration has approved more arms sales than any U.S. administration since World War II
    • Petition: Mr. President: Stop Lying To Us About Fast Track And The TPP
    • Obama’s Wars and the Liberals Who Love Them
    • America's 30-year Cold War with Iran: Manufacturing A Good Adversary
    • Barney Frank drops a bombshell: How a shocking anecdote explains the financial crisis
    • Obama declares Venezuela ‘extraordinary threat’ to U.S. national security

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

Logo%20%7C%20Change%20You%20Can%20Believe%20In%3F%20%28Redacted%29.jpgObama, Bush and Carson believe this nonsense? Jeffrey Tayler, Salon

  • Our faith-addled, God-fearing leaders need to put superstition aside.
  • We expect dimwits like Huckabee to buy into the fire and brimstone. Must President Obama overindulge the faithful?
  • Christian America is an invention: Big business, right-wing politics and the religious lie that still divides us.

###

The Liberal Apologies for Obama’s Ugly Reign, Paul Street, CounterPunch

  • U.S. liberals and progressives might want to learn something about how they’ve been manipulated by Democratic politicians and presidents again and again and decide to invest their hopes and energies in a different kind of more genuinely progressive and democratic politics beneath and beyond the big money-big media-major party-mass-marketed-candidate-centered presidential “electoral extravaganzas” that are staged as “yet another method for marginalizing the population” (Noam Chomsky, October 27, 2004) once every four years.
  • Dancing to His Masters' Tunes
  • Special Project | President Obama, Change we can believe in? Week Ending February 21, 2015

###

The Obama administration has approved more arms sales than any U.S. administration since World War II, Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

  • You can’t have it both ways. You can’t claim you want democracy, and then you’re the number one seller of arms … .
  • Part 1: Are Obama’s Record Arms Sales to Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Egypt and Iraq Fueling Unrest in Middle East?
  • Part 2: "From Bad to Worse": Hundreds Dead & 100,000 Displaced as Saudi-Led Strikes Push Yemen to the Brink

###

sign-btn.pngPetition: Mr. President: Stop Lying To Us About Fast Track And The TPP, The Pen 

  • Mr. President, the more you try to defend the indefensible TPP the bigger your lies seem to get, and just this last Friday you told some serious whoppers.
  • TPP Leak Reveals Extraordinary New Powers for Thousands of Foreign Firms to Challenge U.S. Policies and Demand Taxpayer Compensation

###

Obama’s Wars and the Liberals Who Love Them, Adam Marletta, West End News

  • “The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil,” Albert Einstein wrote, “but because of those who look on and do nothing.”
  • Uri Avnery | Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Bomb?

###

America's 30-year Cold War with Iran: Manufacturing A Good Adversary, Gareth Porter, Washington Spectator

The U.S. will ensure Iran will remain an adversary even if a nuclear agreement is reached. The false nuclear weapons narrative is the latest episode in the long-running drama of U.S. enmity toward Iran, which began three decades ago when Iran took U.S. diplomats hostage after the U.S. gave asylum to the Shah. Despite many other opportunities for cooperation, this cold war will continue solely because the U.S. has a vested interest in demonizing Iran.

###

Barney Frank drops a bombshell: How a shocking anecdote explains the financial crisis, David Dayen, Salon

Ever wonder why we waited six years to get a decent economic recovery? This new revelation will disgust you.

###

Obama declares Venezuela ‘extraordinary threat’ to U.S. national security, Gloria La Riva, Liberation News

Venezuela fights back against U.S.-supported counterrevolution

Pages

Subscribe to Books & Liturature