You are here

Business

Patrick Chappatte | Amazon and the future of retail / media.cagle.com

http://media.cagle.com/38/2017/06/21/197043_600.jpg

Section(s): 

Why it’s Important to Fight the Stigma Attached to Poverty: Part I

http://daily-work.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/poverty-picture.jpg

  • Like me, I hope this poem will make you think more deeply about the strengths of, and challenges faced by, people experiencing poverty.
  • Fake Labor News? What the Mainstream Media Is Not Telling You About the Poor, Week Ending August 5, 2017

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Subscribe%20logo%20with%2011%20Yr%20Banner_0.jpgTo stay on top of important articles like these, sign up here to receive the latest updates from all reader supported Evergreene Digest.

 



Maya Lehmann, Daily Work

July 26, 2017 | It seems like Americans are more polarized than ever before. It is very easy to dismiss and distance ourselves from people whose beliefs, education, background, or values are different from ours. This seems particularly true in the political rhetoric these days, especially when it comes to government services and public assistance. Essentially, we have created and reinforced an “us” vs. “them” mentality that is harmful to American society and impairs our ability to work together and make positive changes that can benefit us all.

This polarization and dichotomy is definitely true in the way that people experiencing poverty are viewed. It is very easy to treat “them” as if they are somehow lesser than “us.” Often we either look at someone who is experiencing poverty as lazy or incompetent, or we act as if we have all of the solutions to fix their life, but both of these perspectives are harmful to someone’s self-sufficiency. We need to actively combat this judgmental attitude because it is not productive and it is harmful towards other people. Not only that, but these negative stereotypes are simply not true. The poem below by Julia Dinsmore articulates why we should not blame people for their situations, but instead support, encourage, affirm, respect, and realize that their situations are often the result of circumstantial or systemic barriers.

Maya Lehmann, Case Management Intern, Daily Work 

Full Story … 

Related:

Fake Labor News? What the Mainstream Media Is Not Telling You About the Poor, Week Ending August 5, 2017, Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

http://www.globalresearch.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Fake-News-400x255.jpgIf you solely rely on the Western media for enlightenment, your acquired knowledge is plain ignorance. You will never learn the truth because they simply manipulate the news. Learn the truth in our selection of articles below. 

• The United States of Cruelty, Charles P. Pierce, Esquire
• America's Disgusting, Boundless Hatred for Poor People, Brittney Cooper, Salon
• GOP Descent into Mindless Meanness, Lawrence Davidson, ConsortiumNews.com
• The rush to humiliate the poor, Dana Milbank, Washington (DC) Post 
• Indiana Republican: ‘No One Has the Guts’ to Let the Poor ‘Wither and Die’, Allen Clifton <>, Forward Progressives 

 

http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PlsShareArrow5.png

Section(s): 

Tracking Trump's Corporate Cronies

  http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Corporate%20Executive%20Swamp%20logos.jpg

  • Instead of removing the insiders as promised, Trump turned over the inner workings of government to the corporate class. 
  • Public Citizen shows Trump’s ‘draining the swamp’ promises were a scam. Check out Public Citizen's CorporateCabinet.org website.
  • Related: License to Kill

Public Citizen

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Virginia Simson

http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/9-strategies-to-end-corporate-rule/images/Stencil.jpg/image_large  August 1, 2017 | Candidate Trump railed against the corporate elite and special interest making backroom deals in D.C., and vowed to give new voices a chance to go into government service.

Instead of removing the insiders as promised, Trump turned over the inner workings of government to the corporate class. Public Citizen has been tracking Trump’s nominations and appointments within his transition team and administration.

Below is some of the work Public Citizen has done, which shows Trump’s ‘draining the swamp’ promises were a scam. Check out Public Citizen's CorporateCabinet.org website.

Public Citizen advocates for a healthier and more equitable world by making government work for the people and by defending democracy from corporate greed.

Full story … 

Try watching this video on www.youtube.com

Related:

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/If%20You%20Use%20it%2C%20Contribute%20To%20It%20banner.jpg

License to Kill, Robert Weissman, Public Citizen 

We need stronger controls on corporate wrongdoing. The last thing we need is to confer on giant corporations a license to kill. Senator Portman’s  Regulatory Accountability Act must be defeated.

http://movetoamend.org/sites/default/files/sign-btn.png View the ad and tell senators not to give Big Business a license to kill. Sign the Petition and We’ll Deliver Your Message to the U.S. Senate

 

http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PlsShareArrow5.png

 

 

 

 
Section(s): 

Mining Truth launches campaign to highlight financial risk from PolyMet

http://www.miningtruth.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/unnamed-1024x302.jpg

  • Mining Truth launches campaign to highlight financial risk from PolyMet
  • $934 million damage deposit is needed to protect taxpayers
  • Sulfide mining pollution would forever change Minnesota, including the Boundary Waters, Lake Superior, and our economy. 

The Mining Truth coalition, Mining Truth

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/We%20Haven%27t%20Put%20Up%20a%20Paywall.jpg

http://www.miningtruth.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Screen-Shot-2015-06-16-at-10.10.13-AM.png07/20/2017 | The Mining Truth coalition launched a public information campaign this week with a goal of ensuring Minnesota taxpayers are protected as permit applications are considered for PolyMet’s proposed sulfide mine in northern Minnesota. Billboards near the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources headquarters in St. Paul and along I-35 highlight the $934 million damage deposit experts say is needed to cover cleanup costs.

“PolyMet’s own permit application says polluted water from the site will require expensive treatment for decades, if not centuries, after this proposed mine closes” said Kathryn Hoffman, Executive Director of the Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy. “Unless Minnesota insists on a bankruptcy-proof, upfront damage deposit, taxpayers could be left with a huge cleanup bill.”

Mining Truth is a coalition of Conservation Minnesota, Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness, and the Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy formed in 2012 to provide a resource for Minnesotans to get facts about how sulfide mining and its potential impacts differ from iron mining.

Full story … 

 

https://scontent-lga3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/14095715_10102955974390751_7796890404794769776_n.jpg?oh=ed79c20cc574e77a57904ba7343e7d53&oe=59A1F11F

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Help grow the movement! Share this story with your friends.

License to Kill

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Rob%20Portman%2C%20Safety%20Threat.jpg

Robert Weissman, Public Citizen

 

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Become%20Part%20of%20Our%20Mission.%20Donate%20Today_0.jpg

http://www.opednews.com/populum/uploadnic/politics-constitution-jpg_11_20121212-72.jpg June 28, 2017 | It may be Big Business’ top priority:

Use the Trump administration not just to roll back Obama-era health, safety, environmental and financial regulatory safeguards, but to make it nearly impossible for future administrations to add new regulatory protections.

The Big Business bill to carry out this scheme is the misnamed Regulatory Accountability Act — more accurately known as the License to Kill Act. The bill’s champion is U.S. Senator Rob Portman of Ohio.

Starting today, we’re airing a hard-hitting TV ad in Senator Portman’s hometown of Cincinnati that makes clear that this gift to giant corporations would cost lives.


http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Take%20Action%20Today%20button.jpg View the ad and tell senators not to give Big Business a license to kill.

Act now.

Portman’s License to Kill bill would give giant corporations the power to block food safety standards, clean water protections, toy safety rules, workplace safety protections, rules to stop bank rip-offs and much more.

The bill would force government agencies to undergo 53 additional procedural steps before issuing a new regulatory protection — and give big corporations the right to sue over each of them.

On top of that, the bill directs agencies to focus not on how they can best protect the American public, but on how to limit the impact on corporate profits.

You can understand why this is such a priority for Big Business.

And why we absolutely can’t let the License to Kill bill become law.

http://movetoamend.org/sites/default/files/sign-btn.png View our ad and add your voice to oppose this deadly proposal.


We’re going to make plain this bill’s human cost and hold its proponents accountable.

We can, and we will, stop this License to Kill.

Onward,

Robert Weissman, President, Public Citizen

 

http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PlsShareArrow5.png

 

 

 

 

A report that analyzed every minimum-wage hike since 1938 should put a bunch of nonsense ideas to rest

http://static4.businessinsider.com/image/572c930091058422008c1181-800-600/2a0622d03c2b2a6c673657a5b72ca83b0f48212e_2400x1800.jpg

Nick Hanauer. _

  • We have been raising the minimum wage for 78 years, and as a new study clearly reveals, 78 years of minimum-wage hikes have produced zero evidence of the "job-killing" consequences these headline writers want us to fear.
  • Related: Dehumanizing the Poor for Fun and Profit

Nick Hanauer, Business Insider

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/We%20the%20People%20...%20Promote%20the%20Corporate%20Welfare.jpgMay 6, 2016 | From the fear-mongering headlines marking passage of $15 statutes in New York and California, you would think nobody ever dared raise the minimum wage before.

  • "Raising minimum wage risky," the Lexington (Kentucky) Herald-Leader tersely warned.
  • "Raising minimum wage hurts low-skill workers," the Detroit News bluntly declared.
  • "Even left-leaning economists say it's a gamble," Vox solemnly cautioned.

Nick Hanauer, Contributor, Business Insider

Full story … 

Related:

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/We%20Haven%27t%20Put%20Up%20a%20Paywall.jpg

Dehumanizing the Poor for Fun and Profit, Leo W. Gerard, Huffington Post 

  • It’s (opposition to increasing - or even having! - the minimum wage) in keeping with Republicans’ view that some workers don’t deserve human dignity because they’re only three-fifths people. 
  • Matt Taibbi | America Has A 'Profound Hatred Of The Weak And The Poor'

 

http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PlsShareArrow5.png

 
Section(s): 

Series | A Living Earth Economy, Part 10: Let’s Help Trump Keep His Promises

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Banner%20Corporate%20Accountability.jpg

  • Has Trump served us all in breaking things open? Only if we use the moment for serious rethinking of policy.
  • Previously in this Series
  • Related: The World Is Better Off if We Leave the Paris Agreement

David Korten, Yes! Magazine

http://www.evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/twitter-4-512.png Now you can follow Evergreene Digest on Twitter.

 





 

http://www.yesmagazine.org/new-economy/lets-help-trump-keep-his-promises-20170419/trump-policy.gif/image Which of Trump’s vague and conflicting promises will he and the Republicans honor, and which will they abandon? No one seems to know, including the president. Photo by PointImages / iStock.

Apr 19, 2017 | Donald Trump’s presidency is off to a rocky start. Political promises are easier made than kept. He needs our help.

Take health care. During the campaign, Trump promised to replace Obamacare with a plan that would cover more people, improve benefits, and lower costs. People cheered. But Trump had no plan. House Republicans came up with a plan that would cover fewer people, provide fewer benefits, and significantly raise costs for most health care consumers. Opposed from all sides, it never came up for a vote.

Now the nation wonders. Which of Trump’s vague and conflicting promises regarding health care, jobs, tax reform, fiscal responsibility, infrastructure repair, and trade will he and the Republicans honor, and which will they abandon? No one seems to know, including the president. And that creates an opportunity for adults from both Republican and Democratic parties to respond.

 http://www.yesmagazine.org/people-power/trump-played-to-anger-but-we-dont-have-to-fall-for-divide-and-conquer-20161214/Korteninset.jpg David Korten wrote this article for YES! Magazine as part of his new series of biweekly columns on “A Living Earth Economy.” David is co-founder and board chair of YES! Magazine, president of the Living Economies Forum, co-chair of the New Economy Working Group, a member of the Club of Rome, and the author of influential books, including When Corporations Rule the World and Change the Story, Change the Future: A Living Economy for a Living Earth. His work builds on lessons from the 21 years he and his wife, Fran, lived and worked in Africa, Asia, and Latin America on a quest to end global poverty

Full story … 

 

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Environment%20Banner.jpg

Previously in this series:

Related:

The World Is Better Off if We Leave the Paris AgreementSusan Matthews, Slate

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Global%20Warming%20Misery%20Index.jpg

 "Misery Index"

  • Will America finally realize that we are no longer the world leader we think we are?
  • Donald Trump is the only world leader who isn’t sure if climate change is real. 
  • Related: 4 Pathways to Our Climate Future—Which Will We Choose?

http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PlsShareArrow5.png

 

 

Sold for Parts: Can Low-Wage Industries Survive Without Immigrants and Refugees?

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Immigration%20Banner.jpg

  • Part 1: Sold for Parts
    • One of the most dangerous companies in the U.S. took advantage of immigrant workers. Then, when they got hurt or fought back, it used America’s laws against them.
  • Part 2: Can Low-Wage Industries Survive Without Immigrants and Refugees?
    • Case Farms’ history shows how many sectors like meatpacking depend on immigrants and refugees. Now business leaders fear President Trump’s policies will create a labor shortage.

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

http://globalassets.starbucks.com/assets/20229527c1c240439ddbc81bf821d95e.jpg Click here to become a monthly sustaining member of all reader-supported Evergreene Digest.

 

 



Part 1: Sold for Parts

One of the most dangerous companies in the U.S. took advantage of immigrant workers. Then, when they got hurt or fought back, it used America’s laws against them.

Michael Grabell, ProPublica

https://static.propublica.org/projects/case-farms/assets/images/generated/story-opener-A-8x10-1200*960-9a4cdc.jpgMay 1, 2017 | By late afternoon, the smell from the Case Farms chicken plant in Canton, Ohio, is like a pungent fog, drifting over a highway lined with dollar stores and auto parts shops. When the stink is at its ripest, it means that the day’s 180,000 chickens have been slaughtered, drained of blood, stripped of feathers and carved into pieces — and it’s time for workers like Osiel López Pérez to clean up. On April 7, 2015, Osiel put on bulky rubber boots and a white hard hat, and trained a pressurized hose on the plant’s stainless steel machines, blasting off the leftover grease, meat and blood.

A Guatemalan immigrant, Osiel was just weeks past his 17th birthday, too young by law to work in a factory. A year earlier, after gang members shot his mother and tried to kidnap his sisters, he left his home, in the mountainous village of Tectitán, and sought asylum in the United States. He got the job at Case Farms with a driver’s license that said his name was Francisco Sepulveda, age 28. The photograph on the ID was of his older brother, who looked nothing like him, but nobody asked any questions.

https://static.propublica.org/projects/case-farms/assets/images/michael-grabell-200x200.jpg Michael Grabell covers economic issues, labor, immigration and trade. He has reported on the ground from more than 30 states, as well as some of the remotest villages in Alaska and Guatemala. His work has appeared in The New Yorker and The New York Times and on Vice and NPR. He has won a Gerald Loeb Award for business journalism and an IRE Medal for investigative reporting and is a three-time finalist for the Livingston Award for Young Journalists.

Full story … 



Part 2: Can Low-Wage Industries Survive Without Immigrants and Refugees?

Case Farms’ history shows how many sectors like meatpacking depend on immigrants and refugees. Now business leaders fear President Trump’s policies will create a labor shortage.

Michael Grabell, ProPublica 

https://static.propublica.org/projects/case-farms/assets/images/generated/case-farms-spot-illo-02-900*549-3952a8.pngMay 5, 2017 | One afternoon this fall, I knocked on the door of a redbrick apartment building in Akron, Ohio, looking for a Bhutanese refugee who’d lost the tips of his fingers at a Case Farms chicken plant in a vacuum-pressure machine known as a “fat sucker.”

In the apartment’s tiny living room, a young man told his story in halting English. As he spoke, I realized that his name was different from the one I had, and, instead of losing his fingertips in a fat sucker at the company’s Canton plant, he’d lost his pinkie to a saw at its plant in nearby Winesburg. I had the wrong guy, but I’d stumbled on yet another Bhutanese refugee who’d sacrificed part of his body for the company.

https://static.propublica.org/projects/case-farms/assets/images/michael-grabell-200x200.jpg Michael Grabell covers economic issues, labor, immigration and trade. He has reported on the ground from more than 30 states, as well as some of the remotest villages in Alaska and Guatemala. His work has appeared in The New Yorker and The New York Times and on Vice and NPR. He has won a Gerald Loeb Award for business journalism and an IRE Medal for investigative reporting and is a three-time finalist for the Livingston Award for Young Journalists.

Full story … 

http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PlsShareArrow5.png

 

 

 

 

Section(s): 

Pages

Subscribe to Business