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Pat Bagley | Corporate Slave / media.cagle.com

Pat Bagley | Corporate Slave / media.cagle.com

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Special Project | Business and Industry Behaving Badly: Week Ending July 13, 2014

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  • Profits before People
  • 8 New items including:
    • The Shocking Numbers Behind Corporate Welfare
    • 10 Corporate Behemoths Stifling Competition and Delivering Awful Service to You
    • The General Motors Ignition Switch Debacle
    • Food Stamps Don't Keep Walmart's Prices Low; They Keep Its Profits High
    • The Kochs’ Fig Leaf
    • How Corporate Giveaways to Applebee’s, Sears, and Other Companies Suck the Lifeblood from Your Community,
    • This man wants you to know the truth about Fukushima
    • Smart Cards Could Have Protected Target Shoppers From Identity Thieves

David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

Monte Wolverton

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The Shocking Numbers Behind Corporate Welfare, David Cay Johnston, Al-Jazeera America

  • In fact, the numbers significantly understate the true value of taxpayer subsidies made by state and local government agencies to businesses, , including cash giveaways, building and land transfers, tax abatements and steep discounts on electric and water bills, for reasons explained here.
  • 10 Corporate Behemoths Stifling Competition and Delivering Awful Service to You

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10 Corporate Behemoths Stifling Competition and Delivering Awful Service to You, Alex Henderson, AlterNet

  • Customers benefit when actual competition occurs. But that's rare these days.
  • Here are 10 mammoth corporations that detest free-market competition and do everything they can to stamp it out or greatly reduce it.
  • The Kochs’ Fig Leaf

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The General Motors Ignition Switch Debacle, compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

  • Was General Motors reckless in its decision not to recall these vehicles of death sooner because it put profits over people's lives?
  • Part 1: "A Culture of Timidity": Ralph Nader on How Regulators Ignored a GM Safety Defect Tied to 13 Deaths
  • Part 2: General Motors Cover-ups Result in Motor Vehicle Deaths, and Workplace Abuses in Colombia

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Food Stamps Don't Keep Walmart's Prices Low; They Keep Its Profits High, Amy Traub, Huffington Post

  • The truth is that Walmart and all the other large and profitable retailersfast food companies, and other corporations that fatten their bottom line by letting the public feed their employees have made a business decision to shrink their payroll on the taxpayer's dime. It's up to us to decide whether to continue allowing them to do it.
  • Walmart Stumbles on SNAP; Warns of Lost Profits

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Pat Bagley

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The Kochs’ Fig Leaf, Think Progress

  • Americans For Prosperity Fesses Up To Their Dirty Agenda
  • The Koch’s goal is to keep the economic deck stacked in their favor and that means a government that only work for the wealthiest. And they will spend whatever it takes to protect their bottom line.
  • Series | Class War for Idiots, Part 1: The Roots of Stalin in the Koch Brothers and the Tea Party Movement

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How Corporate Giveaways to Applebee’s, Sears, and Other Companies Suck the Lifeblood from Your Community, Kenneth Thomas, Alternet

  • They promise jobs, but leave dilapidated schools and crumbling roads in their wake.
  • A growing trend
  • NAFTA, Twenty Years After: A Disaster

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This man wants you to know the truth about Fukushima, Anna Galland, MoveOn.org

Video: The truth about Fukushima in 188 seconds

Please help Harvey Wasserman spread the word about Fukushima today. 

The Crisis at Fukushima's Unit 4 Demands a Global Take-Over

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Smart Cards Could Have Protected Target Shoppers From Identity Thieves, Gerry Smith, Huffington Post

U.S. banks rely on credit cards with magnetic strips, which can be easily reproduced by thieves, while European banks have issued millions of more modern "smart cards" that are embedded with computer chips. Smart cards encrypt transaction information, require thieves to know the cardholder’s PIN, and can generate one-time-only passwords.

 
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Six Signs Your Boss Is a Coward

  • You can see (the cowards') fear and the way they go about trying to hide their insecurities a mile away.
  • Now, the question is: Do you have the strength to leave that cowardly boss and find a new one who is a true brave leader?
  • Why the American Worker Is Miserable

Rob Wyse, LinkedIn

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Six%20Signs%20Your%20Boss%20Is%20a%20Coward.jpg June 06, 2014

1. He has others fire his direct reports.

2. She will make a decision in private, then fail to protect her people in public if it does not work.

3. He tells each person in private what the person “wants to hear,” which means he’s delivering different messages to each.

4. She will not have face-to-face meetings to resolve conflicts.

5. He slips in a negative comment about one of your colleagues in every conversation.

6. She really never says anything personal about herself.

Rob Wyse: Communications Advisor/Strategist/Writer for Global Executives, Managing Director, New York at Capital Content

Full story … 

Related:

Why the American Worker Is Miserable, Jason Notte, TheStreet

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  • A survey by Gallup finds that since the economic crisis peaked in 2009, there's been no better time to exploit the U.S. workforce for longer hours and less pay.
  • The Henry Ford Matrix And The Twilight of Disparity

 

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One of the Biggest Opponents of GMO Labeling Is Offering More Non-GMO Products

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  • Cargill believes genetically modified foods are safe, but losing consumers' favor might be a more expensive setback than sticking to its pro-GMO guns.
  • Walmart’s latest organic scheme is just part of its plot to take over our food system.

Jenna McLaughlin, Mother Jones

Thank%20You%20%28Lg%29%20w%3A10%20yr%20banner.jpg This article is made possible with the generous contributions of all reader supported Evergreene Digest readers like you. Thank you!

gmolab.gif Source/Shutterstock

Jul. 2, 2014 | Cargill, a giant privately held food manufacturer, is one of the biggest enemies of laws requiring companies to label products that contain genetically modified ingredients. But even as the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA), an anti GMO-labeling lobbying group Cargill belongs to, fights GMO-labeling laws in state legislatures and courthouses around the country, Cargill is introducing more GMO-free products.

Last week, Cargill announced its newest non-GMO crop, soybean oil, which will join corn and beans on Cargill's list of unmodified products offered in the United States, among others.

Jenna McLaughlin is an Editorial Fellow in Mother Jones' Washington Bureau. She has previously written and worked for DC Magazine and Baltimore City Paper. She recently graduated from the Johns Hopkins University's Writing Seminars Department.

Full story … 

Related:

Walmart’s latest organic scheme is just part of its plot to take over our food system, Stacy Mitchell, Grist

  • To me, the pivotal question that ought to frame any discussion about Walmart’s role in our food system is: Will people and the planet be better off if Walmart grows to control 50 percent of the U.S. grocery market?
  • A Trojan Carrot 

 

Why the American Worker Is Miserable

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  • A survey by Gallup finds that since the economic crisis peaked in 2009, there's been no better time to exploit the U.S. workforce for longer hours and less pay.
  • The Henry Ford Matrix And The Twilight of Disparity

Jason Notte, TheStreet

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263fe7d0f0e40c0321b799a4dbd97ae1.portrait.jpg 11/21/13 | When you spend enough time scrolling the business pages and reading between the all-caps, bolded lines of tech IPOs and banking settlements, two things become immediately apparent: It's a grim scene outside corner offices and Silicon Valley, and those toiling under that pall are getting increasingly frustrated by the experience.

A few days ago, my colleague Rocco Pendola used Tesla (TSLA_) founder Elon Musk as an example of the media's fixation with building personalities up just to knock them down. He posited that folks like Musk who are out there creating PayPal and electric automobiles hold up a mirror to the rest of us as a reminder of what we haven't and, in many cases, won't achieve. The only flaw to Rocco's argument was limiting it to only the media.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRrThAiSOeHxpckVvvTfSrxHB03yhzvWf3SwtS3YSPWfLmvowkQrVbKLT14 Jason Notte is a reporter for TheStreet. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Huffington Post, Esquire.com, Time Out New York, the Boston Herald.

Full story … 

 

Related:

The Henry Ford Matrix And The Twilight of Disparity, William Annett, Beating the Street, Evergreene Digest

  • When so much income goes to the very top, the middle class and the poor don't have enough purchasing power to buy what the economy is producing. - Robert Reich, Former US Labor Secretary
  • Once upon a Model T...
  • The U.S. Is Even More Unequal Than You Realized

 

Section(s): 

The Henry Ford Matrix And The Twilight of Disparity

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  • When so much income goes to the very top, the middle class and the poor don't have enough purchasing power to buy what the economy is producing. - Robert Reich, Former US Labor Secretary
  • Once upon a Model T...
  • The U.S. Is Even More Unequal Than You Realized

William Annett, Beating the Street, Evergreene Digest

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June 29, 2014 | Henry Ford was a smart fellow. As a matter of fact, he was much smarter than the current ruling junta of the much-envied and much-maligned 1%, because they still haven't yet figured out what Henry realized in the early Twenties. In addition to inventing the assembly line,  he shrewdly calculated the ratio of the worker-wage-purchaser cycle, such that he determined precisely the minimum hourly wage he could pay his workers, compatible with the  maximum price tag he could put on his Model T, in order for his workers to be able to buy their own product, i.e.  his cars.

Take a simple graph - with the vertical axis representing the range of hourly  wage rates for a typical  auto worker, while the horizontal axis represents ascending possible retail prices  for the basic black Model T Ford. (We're talking maybe 1926, so forget the likes of  Rockefeller and Al Capone, who are driving Hupmobiles. We're dealing with the huddled masses here.) Now, draw a tangent from lower left to upper right. Somewhere about where 50 cents an hour on the vertical axis intersects the tangent, corresponding with $250 on the horizontal price continuum, (suggested manufacturer's retail price, SMRP, as the dealer johnnies say nowadays), you reach equilibrium. That is, Henry does, or did, perhaps with killer entrepreneurial instinct. It was the magic intercept or inflection point which, circa 1926,  might be called the Henry Ford Matrix, which he must have sat up nights figuring out. But it's simple: You pay the guy with a lug wrench on the assembly line like five bucks for a ten-hour day to tighten the same nut 500 times, and  he can afford to buy one of your Tin Lizzies.

William Annett has written six books, including a page-turner on mutual funds, a send-up on the securities industry, three corporate histories and a novel, the latter no doubt inspired by his current occupation in Daytona Beach as a law-abiding beach comber.

Full story … 

Related:

The U.S. Is Even More Unequal Than You Realized, Maxwell Strachan, Huffington Post 

  • When it comes to income inequality, no other developed economy does it quite like the U.S.A. If you need some proof, here it is.
  • America’s rotting empire
  • What's a Union For?

 

 

 

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The Fracking Nightmare, July 3, 2014

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  • Fracking's False Promise of Plenty Imperils Our Future.
  • Part 1: Minnesota Town Caught in 'Frac Sand' Mining Rush Wants Answers on Pollution
  • Part 2: New York Towns Can Ban Fracking, State’s Top Court Rules

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

Thank%20You%20%28Lg%29%20w%3A10%20yr%20banner.jpg This article is made possible with the generous contributions of all reader supported Evergreene Digest readers like you. 



Part 1: Minnesota Town Caught in 'Frac Sand' Mining Rush Wants Answers on Pollution

Residents of Winona, Minn., a frac sand transportation hub, say data from the state pollution control agency is months overdue. The state Pollution Control Agency (PCA) said the data would be released in March.

Zahra Hirji, InsideClimate News

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Jim Fuller

winona3.jpg Winona, Minn. is the first local government in the nation to monitor air pollution escaping from the piles of frack sand being trucked through its downtown. Data was promised in March, but because of a dearth of labs to process the data, the community is still waiting. Credit: Ryan Keene 

Jun 23, 2014 | How much dangerous dust is being kicked into the air from the mounds of frac sand hauled daily across the southern Minnesota town of Winona?

Looking for answers, the community got the state to install in January a pollution monitor for crystalline silica, or frac sand­, the first in Minnesota not financed by industry. Located on a building above a major intersection for sand trucks bound for fracking fields, it's been collecting data ever since.

Zahra Hirji: Reporter, InsideClimate News

Full story … 



Part 2: New York Towns Can Ban Fracking, State’s Top Court Rules

The ruling may lead the oil and gas industry to abandon fracking in New York as Cuomo considers whether to lift a statewide moratorium instituted in 2008 that he inherited when he took office.

Chris Dolmetsch, Bloomberg

i3I03JbyW.Hc.jpg June 30 (Bloomberg) -- Bloomberg’s Betty Liu reports that New York State’s highest court ruled that towns and cities can block hydraulic fracturing within their borders, upholding a six-year-old statewide moratorium on the practice. She speaks on “In The Loop.” 

Jun 30, 2014 New York’s cities and towns can block hydraulic fracturing within their borders, the state’s highest court ruled, dealing a blow to an industry awaiting Governor Andrew Cuomo’s decision on whether to uphold a six-year-old statewide moratorium.

The Court of Appeals in Albany today upheld rulings dismissing lawsuits that challenged bans enacted in the upstate towns of Dryden and Middlefield.

Chris Dolmetsch: Bloomberg News legal reporter, covering NY state courts.

Full story … 

 

Brick by brick

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  • Jeff Bezos' radical vision for the Washington Post
  • After years of shrinking ambition at The Washington Post, Jeff Bezos has the paper thinking global domination.

Michael Meyer, Columbia Journalism Review

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meyer-opener-goldbricks.jpg Andrew B. Myers 

June 26, 2014 | In April, six months after her family sold the newspaper it had controlled for eight decades to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, Washington Post publisher Katharine Weymouth walked onstage in the paper’s auditorium to reverse what had been the signature strategy of her six years at the helm. Since she was named publisher in February 2008, a year the newspaper division of The Washington Post Company declared a loss of $193 million, Weymouth had sought to codify the Post’s identity as a paper “For and about Washington.” While touted as a strategy to leverage the Post’s brand of national politics reporting in the digital era, “For and about Washington” was, in the grand tradition of Beltway wordsmithing, a phrase meant to put a positive spin on a period of retrenchment. 

As a practical matter, “For and about Washington” meant the Post no longer covered stories beyond its circulation area unless they had a direct link to political Washington or a federal government interest. Exceptions were made for impossible-to-ignore events, like school shootings and other catastrophes, but all domestic bureaus were closed and correspondents were called home. Digital growth was certainly a goal, but the deeper logic of the strategy was that the relative value of a print subscriber trumped that of a digital subscriber. Print continued to provide the vast majority of the paper’s revenue, and newsroom employees were told repeatedly by Weymouth and her deputy, Post president and general manager Steve Hills, that preserving this revenue stream was the organization’s central priority and hope for continued solvency. Digital growth was encouraged to the extent that it fit with the goal of continuing to be the dominant news outlet in the DC region. In fact, the Post achieved impressive digital growth and a major increase in its national audience under this strategy. But it was all achieved under the banner of narrowing ambitions, and no amount of Pulitzer Prizes or popular new blogs or experimental infusions of digital stem cells could make up for this paradox. 

Michael Meyer is a Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) staff writer.

Full story … 

Related:

Iraq War Boosters Get Second Chance In Media Spotlight, Michael Calderone, Huffington Post

  • This is the American corporate media at its perpetual game, manipulating public opinion as always, against the public interest-- favoring transnational corporations and transnational investors who don't give a damn about this country, or anything beyond their profits.
  • Report from Iraq: U.S. Invasion in 2003 Helped Set Path for Crisis Pulling Nation Apart

 

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