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Paresh Nath | Trump and Reaganomics / media.cagle.com

 

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Trump’s Assault on Immigrants Will Seriously Damage the Economy

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(Reuters / Brian Snyder; Phelan M. Ebenhack via AP; AP Photo / Charlie Riedel, Bryan Cox; Reuters / Stephanie Keith; Reuters / Jose Luis Gonzalez)

  • The key sectors in which we can expect growth are dependent on immigrant labor.
  • Related: The Positive Effects of Sanctuary Policies on Crime and the Economy

Herman Schwartz, the Nation

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/INS%20Visa%20Approval%20Stamp.jpg  April 3, 2017 | President Trump has promised to add millions of “good jobs” to the US economy and to raise the gross domestic product by more than 4 percent annually, at one point asserting: “I think we can do better than that”—as much as 6 percent. “This is the most pro-growth, pro-jobs, pro-family plan put forth in the history of our country,” he proclaimed.

At the same time, the president has vowed to deport up to 3 million undocumented immigrants and to curtail future entries, branding immigrants as “gang members,” “drug dealers,” and “bad hombres.” After his January 27 travel ban on people from seven Muslim-majority countries was blocked by the courts, Trump devised a toned-down version applied to six of them—even though his own Department of Homeland Security has concluded that “country of citizenship is unlikely to be a reliable indicator of potential terrorism.”

Herman Schwartz, a professor of law at the American University, is the author of Right Wing Justice: The Conservative Campaign to Take Over the Courts (2004) and editor of The Rehnquist Court (2002), based on an October 9, 2000, special issue of the Nation.

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The Positive Effects of Sanctuary Policies on Crime and the Economy, Tom K. Wong, Center for American Progress

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  • The Data Are Clear: Sanctuary Counties See Lower Crime Rates and Stronger Economies
  • Related: Special Project | Trump's Sanctuary Cities Plan is Straight Out of Breitbart, Radical Right Playbook
Section(s): 

'Spectacular Betrayal' as Trump Hands Economy 'Back Over to Wall Street'

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Executive orders seen as "a cave-in to the power of Wall Street and the financial lobby." (Photo: Dave Center/flickr/cc)

  • "Wall Street titan Goldman Sachs seems to be taking over financial regulation in the United States, trying to make it easier for them and other big banks like Wells Fargo to steal from their customers and destabilize the economy." —Lisa Donner, Americans for Financial Reform
  • 'The Wall Street bankers against whom Trump ran are making policy now,' says Public Citizen

Deirdre Fulton, Common Dreams

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http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/the-debt-issue/don-t-owe-won-t-pay-charles-eisenstein-debt-20150820/eisensteinwebsketch.jpg/imageFriday, February 03, 2017 | President Donald Trump is handing the U.S. economy "back over to Wall Street" on Friday, with a regulatory rollback that critics say could put consumers and the financial system at risk

According to the Wall Street Journal, Trump signed executive orders Friday "establish[ing] a framework for scaling back the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial-overhaul law" and rolling back an Obama-era regulation requiring advisers on retirement accounts to work in the best interests of their clients. That rule was set to go into effect in April. 

Deirdre Fulton, staff writer, Common Dreams

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Not So Spineless: Paul Ryan Plans To Use Trump’s Chaos To Destroy Medicare, Medicaid And Social Security, Linda Benesch & Alex Lawson, Social Security Works  / Huffington Post

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There is a spineless, cowardly puppet in Washington. But his name isn’t Paul Ryan. It’s Donald Trump, the man who appears willing to betray millions of Americans who voted for him by standing aside, and providing a cover of chaos, while Ryan guts the vital programs they depend on.

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Special Report | New Economic Perspectives: An Introduction to the Economics of Pope Francis

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Responding to Pope Francis’s Call for Dialogue

Robert M. Whaples, The Independent Review

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http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Francis%20I%2C%20Superpope%2C%20Italian%20Street%20Art.jpgWinter 2017 | As the contributors to this symposium show, Pope Francis’s views about the economy, especially about the poor and the rich, are deeply at odds with those of many economists. Several differences involve matters of economic fact and causation—and therefore in principle can be resolved by appeals for everyone to consider the same body of evidence. Although the clash over conflicting values is a chasm far more difficult to bridge, fruitful dialogue is the goal of this symposium.

Pope Francis has invited those concerned about the economy, the environment, and the destiny of the world—everyone—to join a dialogue. And there is a clear need for dialogue between Francis and economists because the pope and many in the economics profession do not see eye to eye at a fundamental level on many issues.

Robert M. Whaple is professor of economics at Wake Forest University and co-editor and managing editor of The Independent Review.

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The Spiritual Crisis of the Modern Economy

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  • The modern economy privileges the well-educated and highly-skilled, while giving them an excuse to denigrate the people at the bottom (both white and nonwhite) as lazy, untalented, uneducated, and unsophisticated.
  • Related: The Meaning Americans Find in Their Jobs

Victor Tan Chen, the Atlantic

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http://dy00k1db5oznd.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/GettyImages-590028618-1280x720.jpg What is happening to America’s white working class?

The group’s important, and perhaps decisive, role in this year’s presidential election sparked a slew of commentary focused on, on the one hand, its nativism, racism, and sexism, and, on the other, its various economic woes. While there are no simple explanations for the desperation and anger visible in many predominantly white working-class communities, perhaps the most astute and original diagnosis came from the rabbi and activist Michael Lerner, who, in assessing Donald Trump’s victory, looked from a broader vantage point than most. Underneath the populist ire, he wrote, was a suffering “rooted in the hidden injuries of class and in the spiritual crisis that the global competitive marketplace generates.”

Victor Tan Chen is an assistant professor of sociology at Virginia Commonwealth University and the author of Cut Loose: Jobless and Hopeless in an Unfair Economy.

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The Meaning Americans Find in Their Jobs, Bourlee Lam and Adrienne Green, the Atlantic

  • Conversations with 100 people about their work and how it shapes who they are
  • "Work is “a search, too, for daily meaning as well as daily bread, for recognition as well as cash, for astonishment rather than torpor; in short, for a sort of life rather than a Monday through Friday sort of dying.” --Studs Terkel book, Working
  • Conversations with 100 people about their work and how it shapes who they are.

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Special Report | More Confessions of an Economic Hitman: This Time They’re Coming for Your Democracy.

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It used to be all we had to worry about was our local community, maybe our country. But we didn’t have to worry about the world. But what we know now is that we can’t have peace anywhere in the world, we can’t have peace in the U.S., unless everybody has peace.

Sarah van Gelder, Yes! Magazine / Siasat

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April 30, 2016 | Twelve years ago, John Perkins published his book, Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, and it rapidly rose up The New York Times’ best-seller list. 

In it, Perkins describes his career convincing heads of state to adopt economic policies that impoverished their countries and undermined democratic institutions. These policies helped to enrich tiny, local elite groups while padding the pockets of U.S.-based transnational corporations.

Sarah van Gelder is co-founder and editor-at-large of Yes! Magazin. Sarah writes articles and conducts interviews for YES! Magazine, and speaks regularly about solutions journalism, grassroots innovations, and social change movements. She is the editor of several books.

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Divest From Prisons, Invest in People—What Justice for Black Lives Really Looks Like

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Photo by Joe Brusky / Flickr. 

  • Instead of addressing the roots of drug addiction, mental illness, and poverty, we’ve come to accept policing and incarceration as catch-all solutions. It’s time for a change.
  • We’ve come to accept policing and incarceration as catch-all solutions.
  • Related: A Former Police Chief: Put Down the Big Stick

Liza Bayless, Yes! Magazine

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Editor%20Comment%20graphic_0.jpg Yes! Magazine Editor's Note: This article is the second part of a series of conversations with contributors to the demands of the Movement for Black Lives. Part One was on reparations.  

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/01/11/opinion/justice190v.jpg  Oct 11, 2016 | In July 2015, more than 2,000 members of The Movement for Black Lives—a group composed of more than 50 racial justice organizations—convened in Cleveland to recognize the violence committed against Black people in this country and around the world. At the assembly, participants decided the Movement needed to form a coalition that articulated concrete ways to build a more equitable society. Six legislative platforms emerged that covered issues like economic justice, reparations, political empowerment, and divestment from policing and incarceration. In their Invest-Divest platform, the authors called instead for investment in programming, like restorative justice initiatives, that would decrease incarceration and strengthen communities.

According to the Brookings Institution, White Americans are equally likely to use and more likely to deal drugs, while African Americans are more likely to be arrested, convicted, and sentenced harshly. For U.S. residents born in 2001, the Bureau of Justice Statistics predicts that 1 in 111 White women will go to prison in her lifetime, while 1 in 18 Black women will. For White men, the likelihood is 1 in 17; for Black men, 1 in 3.

Liza Bayles is an editorial intern at YES! Liza wrote this article for YES!.  

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A Former Police Chief: Put Down the Big Stick, David C. Couper, the Progressive 

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There is a long and difficult road ahead of us. We know what it is because we have heard it before for so many years. The 1968 Commission on the Causes and Prevention of Violence (Kerner Commission) identified the problem: we are becoming two societies, one black, one white, separate and unequal. It’s the same today.

 

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