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Noam Chomsky: There's a Huge Desire to Revamp Our Exploitive Economy, Bubbling in the Collective Unconscious

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  • The Next System is closer than you think.
  • Related: Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 6: Adverse Effects Of Globalization,

Noam Chomsky, The Next System / AlterNet 

http://www.alternet.org/files/styles/story_image/public/story_images/storyimages_screenshot20101130at8.57.09am_0.png  April 15, 2016 | Philosopher, linguist, and social critic Noam Chomsky recently spoke about his experiences in campus activism and his vision of a just society to help inaugurate the Next System Project’s ambitious new teach-ins initiative taking place across the country. An initial signatory to the Next System statement, Chomsky explores the connections between culture, mass movements, and economic experiments—which in “mutually reinforcing” interaction, may build toward a next system more quickly than you may think. 

 

Next System Project: As the Next System Project engages in dozens of university campus-based teach-ins across the country, what do you think of such approaches to engaging campus communities in deep, critical inquiry—can they help transform our society?

Noam Chomsky is an American linguist, philosopher, cognitive scientist, logician, political commentator and activist. He is perhaps best known as a critic of all forms of social control and a relentless advocate for community-centered approaches to democracy and freedom. Over the last several decades, Chomsky has championed a wide range of dissident actions, organizations and social movements.

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Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 6: Adverse Effects Of Globalization, John Scales Avery, Countercurrents.org

  • We need instead to reform our economic system and to give it both a social conscience and an ecological conscience. Let us restore democracy! Let us have governments that work for the welfare of all their citizens, rather than for the enormous enrichment of the few!
  • This is the sixth story in a nine-part series looking at the need for a new economic system. Previous installments are listed below.

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 6: Adverse Effects Of Globalization

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  • We need instead to reform our economic system and to give it both a social conscience and an ecological conscience. Let us restore democracy! Let us have governments that work for the welfare of all their citizens, rather than for the enormous enrichment of the few!
  • This is the sixth story in a nine-part series looking at the need for a new economic system. Previous installments are listed below.

John Scales Avery, Countercurrents.org

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http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31VZKSO24bL._SX351_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg   17 August, 2015 | Child Labour and Slavery

In the early 19th century, industrial society began to be governed by new rules: Traditions were forgotten and replaced by purely economic laws. Labor was viewed as a commodity, like coal or grain, and wages were paid according to the laws of supply and demand, without regard for the needs of the workers. Wages fell to starvation levels, hours of work increased, and working conditions deteriorated.

John Fielden’s book, “The Curse of the Factory System” was written in 1836, and it describes the condition of young children working in the cotton mills. “The small nimble fingers of children being by far the most in request, the custom instantly sprang up of procuring ’apprentices’ from the different parish workhouses of London, Birmingham and elsewhere... Overseers were appointed to see to the works, whose interest it was to work the children to the utmost, because their pay was in proportion to the quantity of work that they could exact.”

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Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 5: The Threats And Costs Of War

Can we not rid ourselves of both nuclear weapons and the institution of war itself? We must act quickly and resolutely before our beautiful world and everything that we love are reduced to radioactive ashes.

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 4: Neocolonialism And Resource Wars

In addition to the enormous suffering, waste, injustice and ecological destruction produced by modern wars, we must recognize that in an era of thermonuclear weapons, war has become prohibitively dangerous. Therefore we need a new economic system.

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 3: Climate Change and the Urgent Need for Renewable Energy 

One of the greatest threats to the survival of the human species and the biosphere is catastrophic climate change.

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 2: Entropy and Economics 

We urgently need to shift quickly from fossil fuels to renewable energy if we are to avoid a tipping point after which human efforts to avoid catastrophic climate change will be futile because feedback loops will have taken over. 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 1: Limits to Economic Growth 

It is obvious that on a finite Earth, neither population growth nor economic growth can continue indefinitely.

Section(s): 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 5: The Threats And Costs Of War

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Can we not rid ourselves of both nuclear weapons and the institution of war itself? We must act quickly and resolutely before our beautiful world and everything that we love are reduced to radioactive ashes.

John Scales Avery, Countercurrents.org

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Coffee%20%26%20Paper%20Graphic.jpg Journalism with real independence and integrity is a rare thing. All reader supported Evergreene Digest relies - exclusively!- on reader donations. Click on the donation button above to make a contribution and support our work.

17 August, 2015 | The costs of war, both direct and indirect, are so enormous that they are almost beyond comprehension. Globally, the institution of war interferes seriously with the use of tax money for constructive and peaceful purposes.

Today, despite the end of the Cold War, the world spends roughly 1.7 trillion (i.e. 1.7 million million) US dollars each year on armaments. This colossal flood of money could have been used instead for education, famine relief, development of infrastructure, or on urgently needed public health measures.

John Scales Avery is a theoretical chemist noted for his research publications in quantum chemistry, thermodynamics, evolution, and history of science. Since the early 1990s, Avery has been an active World peace activist. 

Full story … 

Related:

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 4: Neocolonialism And Resource Wars

In addition to the enormous suffering, waste, injustice and ecological destruction produced by modern wars, we must recognize that in an era of thermonuclear weapons, war has become prohibitively dangerous. Therefore we need a new economic system.

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 3: Climate Change and the Urgent Need for Renewable Energy 

One of the greatest threats to the survival of the human species and the biosphere is catastrophic climate change. 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 2: Entropy and Economics 

We urgently need to shift quickly from fossil fuels to renewable energy if we are to avoid a tipping point after which human efforts to avoid catastrophic climate change will be futile because feedback loops will have taken over. 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 1: Limits to Economic Growth

It is obvious that on a finite Earth, neither population growth nor economic growth can continue indefinitely.

Section(s): 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 4: Neocolonialism And Resource Wars

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Our present economic system produces an endless series of resource-motivated wars. In addition to the enormous suffering, waste, injustice and ecological destruction produced by modern wars, we must recognize that in an era of thermonuclear weapons, war has become prohibitively dangerous. Therefore we need a new economic system.

John Scales Avery, Countercurrents.org

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Coffee%20%26%20Paper%20Graphic.jpg Journalism with real independence and integrity is a rare thing. All reader supported Evergreene Digest relies - exclusively!- on reader donations. Click on the donation button above to make a contribution and support our work.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31VZKSO24bL._SX351_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg09 August, 2015 | Hobson's explanation of colonialism

The Industrial Revolution opened up an enormous gap in military strength between the industrialized nations and the rest of the world. Taking advantage of their superior weaponry, Europe, the United States and Japan rapidly carved up the remainder of the world into colonies, which acted as sources of raw materials and food, and as markets for manufactured goods. Between 1800 and 1914, the percentage of the earth under the domination of colonial powers increased to 85 percent, if former colonies are included.

The English economist and Fabian, John Atkinson Hobson (1858-1940), offered a famous explanation of the colonial era in his book "Imperialism: A Study" (1902). According to Hobson, the basic problem that led to colonial expansion was an excessively unequal distribution of incomes in the industrialized countries. The result of this unequal distribution was that neither the rich nor the poor could buy back the total output of their society. The incomes of the poor were insufficient, and rich were too few in number. The rich had finite needs, and tended to reinvest their money. As Hobson pointed out, reinvestment in new factories only made the situation worse by increasing output.

John Scales Avery is a theoretical chemist noted for his research publications in quantum chemistry, thermodynamics, evolution, and history of science. Since the early 1990s, Avery has been an active World peace activist. 

Full story … 

Related:

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 3: Climate Change and the Urgent Need for Renewable Energy 

One of the greatest threats to the survival of the human species and the biosphere is catastrophic climate change. 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 2: Entropy and Economics 

We urgently need to shift quickly from fossil fuels to renewable energy if we are to avoid a tipping point after which human efforts to avoid catastrophic climate change will be futile because feedback loops will have taken over. 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 1: Limits to Economic Growth

It is obvious that on a finite Earth, neither population growth nor economic growth can continue indefinitely.

Section(s): 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 3: Climate Change and the Urgent Need for Renewable Energy

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In the future, the only way that we can avoid economic collapse is to build a steady-state economy. There exists much literature on how this can be achieved, and these writings ought to become a part of the education of all economists and politicians.

John Scales Avery, Countercurrents.org

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http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31VZKSO24bL._SX351_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg 05 August, 2015 | One of the greatest threats to the survival of the human species and the biosphere is catastrophic climate change. Scientists warn that if the transition to renewable energy does not happen within very few decades, there is a danger that we will reach a tipping point beyond which feedback loops, such as the albedo effect and the methane hydrate feedback loop, will take over and produce an out-of-control and fatal increase in global temperature.

In 2012, the World Bank issued a report warning that without quick action to curb CO2 emissions, global warming is likely to reach 4 degrees C during the 21st century. This is dangerously close to the temperature which initiated the Permian-Triassic extinction event: 6 degrees C above normal. During the Permian-Triassic extinction event, which occurred 252 million years ago, 96% of all marine species were wiped out, as well as 70% of all terrestrial vertebrates.

John Scales Avery is a theoretical chemist noted for his research publications in quantum chemistry, thermodynamics, evolution, and history of science. Since the early 1990s, Avery has been an active World peace activist. 

Full story … 

Related:

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 2: Entropy and Economics 

We urgently need to shift quickly from fossil fuels to renewable energy if we are to avoid a tipping point after which human efforts to avoid catastrophic climate change will be futile because feedback loops will have taken over. 

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Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 1: Limits to Economic Growth

It is obvious that on a finite Earth, neither population growth nor economic growth can continue indefinitely.

Section(s): 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 2: Entropy and Economics

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/New%20Economic%20Perspectives%20banner.jpg

In the future, the only way that we can avoid economic collapse is to build a steady-state economy. There exists much literature on how this can be achieved, and these writings ought to become a part of the education of all economists and politicians.

John Scales Avery, Countercurrents.org

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Cuppa%20Java-lg%20with%2010%20yr%20banner.jpg Journalism with real independence and integrity is a rare thing. All reader supported Evergreene Digest relies - exclusively!- on reader donations. Click on the donation button above to make a contribution and support our work.

 

31VZKSO24bL._SX351_BO1,204,203,200_.jpghttp://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31VZKSO24bL._SX351_BO1,204,203,200... 27 July, 2015 | Part 1 of this series of articles documented the world's urgent need for a reformed economic system. Here are a few more links that underline the pressing need for change.

 

We urgently need to shift quickly from fossil fuels to renewable energy if we are to avoid a tipping point after which human efforts to avoid catastrophic climate change will be futile because feedback loops will have taken over. The dangerous methane hydrate feedback loop is discussed in an excellent short video made by Thom Hartmann and the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation.

Celebrated author and activist Naomi Klein has emphasized the link between need for economic reform and our urgent duty to address climate change.

Rebel economist Prof. Tim Jackson discusses the ways in which our present economic system has failed us, and the specific reforms that are needed. In one of his publications, he says: “The myth of growth has failed us. It has failed the two billion people who still live on $2 a day. It has failed the fragile ecological systems on which we depend for survival. It has failed, spectacularly, in its own terms, to provide economic stability and secure people's livelihood.”

John Scales Avery is a theoretical chemist noted for his research publications in quantum chemistry, thermodynamics, evolution, and history of science. Since the early 1990s, Avery has been an active World peace activist. 

Full story … 

Related:

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 1: Limits to Economic Growth

It is obvious that on a finite Earth, neither population growth nor economic growth can continue indefinitely.

Section(s): 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 1: Limits to Economic Growth

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/New%20Economic%20Perspectives%20banner.jpg

It is obvious that on a finite Earth, neither population growth nor economic growth can continue indefinitely.

John Scales Avery, Countercurrents.org

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/%2522%40%2522%20Logo%20with%2010%20yr%20banner.jpg To stay on top of important articles like these, sign up here to receive the latest updates from all reader supported Evergreene Digest.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31VZKSO24bL._SX351_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgJuly, 2015 | The Industrial Revolution marked the start of massive human use of fossil fuels. The stored energy from several hundred million years of plant growth began to be used at roughly a million times the rate at which it had been formed. The effect on human society was like that of a narcotic. There was a euphoric (and totally unsustainable) surge of growth of both population and industrial production. Meanwhile, the carbon released into the atmosphere from the burning of fossil fuels began to duplicate the conditions which led to the 5 geologically-observed mass extinctions, during each of which more than half of all living species disappeared forever.

Economists (with a few notable exceptions) have long behaved as though growth were synonymous with economic health. If the gross national product of a country increases steadily by 4% per year, most economists express approval and say that the economy is healthy. If the economy could be made to grow still faster (they maintain), it would be still more healthy. If the growth rate should fall, economic illness would be diagnosed.

John Scales Avery is a theoretical chemist noted for his research publications in quantum chemistry, thermodynamics, evolution, and history of science. Since the early 1990s, Avery has been an active World peace activist. 

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