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Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 5: The Threats And Costs Of War

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Can we not rid ourselves of both nuclear weapons and the institution of war itself? We must act quickly and resolutely before our beautiful world and everything that we love are reduced to radioactive ashes.

John Scales Avery, Countercurrents.org

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17 August, 2015 | The costs of war, both direct and indirect, are so enormous that they are almost beyond comprehension. Globally, the institution of war interferes seriously with the use of tax money for constructive and peaceful purposes.

Today, despite the end of the Cold War, the world spends roughly 1.7 trillion (i.e. 1.7 million million) US dollars each year on armaments. This colossal flood of money could have been used instead for education, famine relief, development of infrastructure, or on urgently needed public health measures.

John Scales Avery is a theoretical chemist noted for his research publications in quantum chemistry, thermodynamics, evolution, and history of science. Since the early 1990s, Avery has been an active World peace activist. 

Full story … 

Related:

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 4: Neocolonialism And Resource Wars

In addition to the enormous suffering, waste, injustice and ecological destruction produced by modern wars, we must recognize that in an era of thermonuclear weapons, war has become prohibitively dangerous. Therefore we need a new economic system.

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 3: Climate Change and the Urgent Need for Renewable Energy 

One of the greatest threats to the survival of the human species and the biosphere is catastrophic climate change. 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 2: Entropy and Economics 

We urgently need to shift quickly from fossil fuels to renewable energy if we are to avoid a tipping point after which human efforts to avoid catastrophic climate change will be futile because feedback loops will have taken over. 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 1: Limits to Economic Growth

It is obvious that on a finite Earth, neither population growth nor economic growth can continue indefinitely.

Section(s): 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 4: Neocolonialism And Resource Wars

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Our present economic system produces an endless series of resource-motivated wars. In addition to the enormous suffering, waste, injustice and ecological destruction produced by modern wars, we must recognize that in an era of thermonuclear weapons, war has become prohibitively dangerous. Therefore we need a new economic system.

John Scales Avery, Countercurrents.org

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Coffee%20%26%20Paper%20Graphic.jpg Journalism with real independence and integrity is a rare thing. All reader supported Evergreene Digest relies - exclusively!- on reader donations. Click on the donation button above to make a contribution and support our work.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31VZKSO24bL._SX351_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg09 August, 2015 | Hobson's explanation of colonialism

The Industrial Revolution opened up an enormous gap in military strength between the industrialized nations and the rest of the world. Taking advantage of their superior weaponry, Europe, the United States and Japan rapidly carved up the remainder of the world into colonies, which acted as sources of raw materials and food, and as markets for manufactured goods. Between 1800 and 1914, the percentage of the earth under the domination of colonial powers increased to 85 percent, if former colonies are included.

The English economist and Fabian, John Atkinson Hobson (1858-1940), offered a famous explanation of the colonial era in his book "Imperialism: A Study" (1902). According to Hobson, the basic problem that led to colonial expansion was an excessively unequal distribution of incomes in the industrialized countries. The result of this unequal distribution was that neither the rich nor the poor could buy back the total output of their society. The incomes of the poor were insufficient, and rich were too few in number. The rich had finite needs, and tended to reinvest their money. As Hobson pointed out, reinvestment in new factories only made the situation worse by increasing output.

John Scales Avery is a theoretical chemist noted for his research publications in quantum chemistry, thermodynamics, evolution, and history of science. Since the early 1990s, Avery has been an active World peace activist. 

Full story … 

Related:

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 3: Climate Change and the Urgent Need for Renewable Energy 

One of the greatest threats to the survival of the human species and the biosphere is catastrophic climate change. 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 2: Entropy and Economics 

We urgently need to shift quickly from fossil fuels to renewable energy if we are to avoid a tipping point after which human efforts to avoid catastrophic climate change will be futile because feedback loops will have taken over. 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 1: Limits to Economic Growth

It is obvious that on a finite Earth, neither population growth nor economic growth can continue indefinitely.

Section(s): 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 3: Climate Change and the Urgent Need for Renewable Energy

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In the future, the only way that we can avoid economic collapse is to build a steady-state economy. There exists much literature on how this can be achieved, and these writings ought to become a part of the education of all economists and politicians.

John Scales Avery, Countercurrents.org

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http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31VZKSO24bL._SX351_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg 05 August, 2015 | One of the greatest threats to the survival of the human species and the biosphere is catastrophic climate change. Scientists warn that if the transition to renewable energy does not happen within very few decades, there is a danger that we will reach a tipping point beyond which feedback loops, such as the albedo effect and the methane hydrate feedback loop, will take over and produce an out-of-control and fatal increase in global temperature.

In 2012, the World Bank issued a report warning that without quick action to curb CO2 emissions, global warming is likely to reach 4 degrees C during the 21st century. This is dangerously close to the temperature which initiated the Permian-Triassic extinction event: 6 degrees C above normal. During the Permian-Triassic extinction event, which occurred 252 million years ago, 96% of all marine species were wiped out, as well as 70% of all terrestrial vertebrates.

John Scales Avery is a theoretical chemist noted for his research publications in quantum chemistry, thermodynamics, evolution, and history of science. Since the early 1990s, Avery has been an active World peace activist. 

Full story … 

Related:

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 2: Entropy and Economics 

We urgently need to shift quickly from fossil fuels to renewable energy if we are to avoid a tipping point after which human efforts to avoid catastrophic climate change will be futile because feedback loops will have taken over. 

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Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 1: Limits to Economic Growth

It is obvious that on a finite Earth, neither population growth nor economic growth can continue indefinitely.

Section(s): 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 2: Entropy and Economics

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/New%20Economic%20Perspectives%20banner.jpg

In the future, the only way that we can avoid economic collapse is to build a steady-state economy. There exists much literature on how this can be achieved, and these writings ought to become a part of the education of all economists and politicians.

John Scales Avery, Countercurrents.org

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Cuppa%20Java-lg%20with%2010%20yr%20banner.jpg Journalism with real independence and integrity is a rare thing. All reader supported Evergreene Digest relies - exclusively!- on reader donations. Click on the donation button above to make a contribution and support our work.

 

31VZKSO24bL._SX351_BO1,204,203,200_.jpghttp://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31VZKSO24bL._SX351_BO1,204,203,200... 27 July, 2015 | Part 1 of this series of articles documented the world's urgent need for a reformed economic system. Here are a few more links that underline the pressing need for change.

 

We urgently need to shift quickly from fossil fuels to renewable energy if we are to avoid a tipping point after which human efforts to avoid catastrophic climate change will be futile because feedback loops will have taken over. The dangerous methane hydrate feedback loop is discussed in an excellent short video made by Thom Hartmann and the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation.

Celebrated author and activist Naomi Klein has emphasized the link between need for economic reform and our urgent duty to address climate change.

Rebel economist Prof. Tim Jackson discusses the ways in which our present economic system has failed us, and the specific reforms that are needed. In one of his publications, he says: “The myth of growth has failed us. It has failed the two billion people who still live on $2 a day. It has failed the fragile ecological systems on which we depend for survival. It has failed, spectacularly, in its own terms, to provide economic stability and secure people's livelihood.”

John Scales Avery is a theoretical chemist noted for his research publications in quantum chemistry, thermodynamics, evolution, and history of science. Since the early 1990s, Avery has been an active World peace activist. 

Full story … 

Related:

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 1: Limits to Economic Growth

It is obvious that on a finite Earth, neither population growth nor economic growth can continue indefinitely.

Section(s): 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 1: Limits to Economic Growth

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/New%20Economic%20Perspectives%20banner.jpg

It is obvious that on a finite Earth, neither population growth nor economic growth can continue indefinitely.

John Scales Avery, Countercurrents.org

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/%2522%40%2522%20Logo%20with%2010%20yr%20banner.jpg To stay on top of important articles like these, sign up here to receive the latest updates from all reader supported Evergreene Digest.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31VZKSO24bL._SX351_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgJuly, 2015 | The Industrial Revolution marked the start of massive human use of fossil fuels. The stored energy from several hundred million years of plant growth began to be used at roughly a million times the rate at which it had been formed. The effect on human society was like that of a narcotic. There was a euphoric (and totally unsustainable) surge of growth of both population and industrial production. Meanwhile, the carbon released into the atmosphere from the burning of fossil fuels began to duplicate the conditions which led to the 5 geologically-observed mass extinctions, during each of which more than half of all living species disappeared forever.

Economists (with a few notable exceptions) have long behaved as though growth were synonymous with economic health. If the gross national product of a country increases steadily by 4% per year, most economists express approval and say that the economy is healthy. If the economy could be made to grow still faster (they maintain), it would be still more healthy. If the growth rate should fall, economic illness would be diagnosed.

John Scales Avery is a theoretical chemist noted for his research publications in quantum chemistry, thermodynamics, evolution, and history of science. Since the early 1990s, Avery has been an active World peace activist. 

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Section(s): 

Another Damning Phony Jobs Report

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  • The monthly payroll jobs reports have become a bad joke.
  • Tally beats expectations but major gains were in low wage industries such as restaurants and retail as unemployment rate holds steady at 4.9%.
  • Part 1: Paychecks Shrink Even as U.S. Economy Adds Jobs
  • Part 2: Another Phony Jobs Report

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest


 

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/End%20Corporate%20Greed%20Occupy.jpgPart 1: Paychecks Shrink Even as U.S. Economy Adds Jobs

Tally beats expectations but major gains were in low wage industries such as restaurants and retail as unemployment rate holds steady at 4.9%.

Alexander Reed Kelly, Truthdig

 

http://www.truthdig.com/images/eartothegrounduploads/5995197521_4c1071c095_z.jpg  A line forms outside a claims office. (Phil Campbell / CC-BY-2.0)

Mar 7, 2016 | The U.S. economy added 242,000 jobs in February—but the major gains were in low-wage industries, and average hourly earnings dropped 3 cents. And unemployment rates remained far higher for minorities than for whites.

The Guardian reports:

US businesses have now added 14.3m jobs over six straight years. The unemployment rate is half what it was at the height of the recession. In January the Labor Department announced the economy had added a disappointing 151,000 new jobs. December and January’s reports have now been revised with the Labor Department adding 30,000 jobs for the two months. …

Alexander Reed Kelly, Assistant Editor, Truthdig

Full story … 


 

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Part 2: Another Phony Jobs Report

 

And if true it is damning.

Paul Craig Roberts, Institute for Political Economy

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor John Stoltenberg.

March 4, 2016 | The monthly payroll jobs reports have become a bad joke.

No growth in real retail sales, but 55,000 retail trade new jobs in February.

No growth in real consumer income, but 40,000 more waitresses and bartenders.

86,000 new jobs in Education, health services, and social assistance. February is a strange month to be hiring new teachers. If February brought a quarter million new jobs, how come a big hike in social assistance jobs?

Manufacturing lost 16,000 jobs.

Paul Craig Roberts was Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Economic Policy and associate editor of the Wall Street Journal. He was columnist for Business Week, Scripps Howard News Service, and Creators Syndicate. 

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Section(s): 

Why wealthy Americans’ delusions about the poor are so dangerous

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  • Regressive state and local tax policies don’t just harm the working class -- they can ruin entire economies.
  • The False Debate on Homelessness
  • Here’s 6 Common Welfare Myths We All Need to Stop Believing

David Sirota, Salon

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Friday, Jan 23, 2015 |  American politics are dominated by those with money. As such, America’s tax debate is dominated by voices that insist the rich are unduly persecuted by high taxes and that low-income folks are living the high life. Indeed, a new survey by the Pew Research Center recently found that the most financially secure Americans believe “poor people today have it easy.”

The rich are certainly entitled to their own opinions — but, as the old saying goes, nobody is entitled to their own facts. With that in mind, here’s a set of tax facts that’s worth considering: Middle- and low-income Americans are facing far higher state and local tax rates than the wealthy. In all, a comprehensive analysis by the nonpartisan Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy finds that the poorest 20 percent of households pay on average more than twice the effective state and local tax rate (10.9 percent) as the richest 1 percent of taxpayers (5.4 percent).

David Sirota is a senior writer for the International Business Times and the best-selling author of the books "Hostile Takeover," "The Uprising" and "Back to Our Future." 

Full story … 

Related:

The False Debate on Homelessness, Amien Essif, Jacobin

  • Homelessness is the natural result of a system that makes some fantastically wealthy and others desperately poor.
  • John Steppling | Hollywood, the Police and the Poor

 

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Here’s 6 Common Welfare Myths We All Need to Stop Believing, Tom Cahill, U. S. Uncut <http://usuncut.com>

  • Debunked.
  • Why wealthy Americans’ delusions about the poor are so dangerous

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