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The Uncommon Conversation on Sex Abuse Needs to Move to the Next Level

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  • Part 1: 'Uncommon conversation' on sex abuse falls silent
    • An "uncommon conversation" is on hold in Minnesota.
  • Part 2: Leonard Pitts Jr.: What does it mean to be a man?
    • You see, Fox "News" has it exactly wrong. Men are not an endangered species. Real men are another matter.
  • Related: The Sexual Harassment Conversation Needs to Move to the Next Level

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

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Part 1: 'Uncommon conversation' on sex abuse falls silent

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Empty%20Chairs%20Arranged%20in%20a%20Circle.jpg(Dreamstime/Bernd Schmidt/NCR staff)

An "uncommon conversation" is on hold in Minnesota.

Brian Roewe, National Catholic Reporter (NCR) 

Jul 18, 2017 | After meeting a decade ago at a sex abuse treatment conference, Gil Gustafson and Susan Pavlak each came to see in their pasts a possible way forward for their home archdiocese, St. Paul-Minneapolis, as it struggled to deal with the scandal of clergy sexual abuse.

Pavlak, now 62, was sexually abused as a child by a teacher who was a former nun at a Catholic school. Gustafson, now 66, pleaded guilty in 1983 to sexually abusing a teenage boy, and has since admitted to abuse of three other male minors. By coming to know each other, each had grown personally. They wondered if they could duplicate that experience for other victims and abusers.

Brian Roewe is an National Catholioc Reporter (NCR) staff writer.

Full story … 





Part 2: Leonard Pitts Jr.: What does it mean to be a man?

You see, Fox "News" has it exactly wrong. Men are not an endangered species. Real men are another matter.

Leonard Pitts Jr. <>, Miami (FL) Herald / Tampa Bay (FL) Times

November 26, 2017 | So I guess you can take men off the endangered species list.

It wasn’t that long ago we were hearing that men were in trouble. It was said that our manly maleness was under siege from a culture of runaway political correctness hellbent on snipping off our masculine accoutrements and turning us into sissified wimps who ate kale, clipped coupons and talked about our feelings. Fox "News" sounded the alarm about what it dubbed the "feminization" of the American man.

Leonard Pitts Jr. is an American commentator, journalist and novelist. He is a nationally syndicated columnist and winner of the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary.

Full story … 

Related:

The Sexual Harassment Conversation Needs to Move to the Next Level, Katrina vanden Heuvel, the Nation

https://www.thenation.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/believe-women-march-ap-img.jpg?scale=896&compress=80Participants march against sexual assault and harassment at the #MeToo March in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles, November 12, 2017. (AP Photo / Damian Dovarganes)

  • What’s needed are real structural and legal changes to support the victims and curb the predators.
  • Related: What We Lose When We Let Predatory Men Shape The National Conversation

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No Justice!  No Peace!  Please share this post.

The Sexual Harassment Conversation Needs to Move to the Next Level

 

https://www.thenation.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/believe-women-march-ap-img.jpg?scale=896&compress=80

Participants march against sexual assault and harassment at the #MeToo March in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles, November 12, 2017. (AP Photo / Damian Dovarganes)

  • What’s needed are real structural and legal changes to support the victims and curb the predators.
  • Related: What We Lose When We Let Predatory Men Shape The National Conversation

Katrina vanden Heuvel, the Nation

November 28, 2017 | Women are forcing a long-overdue reckoning on sexual harassment. The list of ousted executives and politicians keeps growing. The thousands of reports of sexual harassment on #MeToo keep coming. More women are emboldened to talk, and more are being heard. The risks for abusers—particularly public figures—are rising. We know the roots of this extraordinary moment; where the moment leads remains to be seen.

The reckoning is part of the fierce reaction to Donald Trump’s election victory in 2016. Trump won in spite of the ultimate “October surprise,” when the Access Hollywood tape confirmed what more than a dozen women had alleged: Trump is a serial sexual predator, admitting on tape that, “when you’re a star, they let you do it. You can do anything. ... Grab them by the p—-y. You can do anything.”

A president is the nation’s great teacher. Women were not about to allow him to teach that lesson.

Katrina vanden Heuvel is editor and publisher of The Nation.

Full story … 

Related:

What We Lose When We Let Predatory Men Shape The National Conversation, Emma Gray, HuffPost

  • http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Matt%20Lauer%20Leaves%20Rockefeller%20Center.jpg Matt Lauer’s 20-year position at NBC allowed him to frame the way stories about powerful women and Very Bad Men were told — and not told.
  • It is a disturbing thought experiment to look at the media men who have faced allegations of sexual misconduct over the past two months and consider what stories might have been told had women been in their places.
  • Related: Trump Is Quietly Making It Even Harder To Report Sexual Harassment And Discrimination

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What We Lose When We Let Predatory Men Shape The National Conversation

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Matt Lauer’s 20-year position at NBC allowed him to frame the way stories about powerful women and Very Bad Men were told — and not told.

  • It is a disturbing thought experiment to look at the media men who have faced allegations of sexual misconduct over the past two months and consider what stories might have been told had women been in their places.
  • Related: Trump Is Quietly Making It Even Harder To Report Sexual Harassment And Discrimination

Emma Gray, HuffPost

  http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Have%20You%20No%20Shame%20with%2011%20Yr%20Banner%20alt.jpgA Culture Built On Free Service

What started out as an information service based on public support has now become a culture of free service. The process is absolutely being abused. A budget is required. Not a huge budget, but a “reasonable” one.

We’ll press the case until we get that.

David Culver, Founder, Publisher
Evergreene Digest

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11/29/2017 | In September 2016, Matt Lauer came under fire for his treatment of then–presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at the NBC Commander in Chief Forum.

The format of the forum had Clinton answering questions for 30 minutes, followed by Donald Trump doing the same. During Clinton’s turn, Lauer focused one-third of that time on seemingly prepared questions about her private email server. He asked tough follow-up questions, and interrupted her answers more than once. By the time a veteran in the audience could ask Clinton a specific question about how she would deploy troops to combat ISIS ― the type of inquiry that would allow her to show Americans her understanding of foreign policy and her concrete plans should she become Commander in Chief ― Lauer cut in before she could answer, asking that her response be delivered “as briefly as you can.”

https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/5570a9431300001700214f52.jpg?ops=100_100 Emma Gray is the Executive Women's Editor at HuffPost. She is also the co-host of the "Bachelor"-themed podcast, "Here To Make Friends," which was named a "must-listen" by The Daily Dot, and has appeared as an expert on the Today Show, Good Morning America, The Insider and Entertainment Tonight.

Full story … 

Related:

Trump Is Quietly Making It Even Harder To Report Sexual Harassment And Discrimination, Emily Peck, Huffington Post

https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/5a15b933150000bb348597be.jpeg?ops=scalefit_720_noupscale Members of the National Organization for Women hold a rally to call upon Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. to reopen a criminal investigation against Harvey Weinstein. Brendan McDermid / Reuters

  • The White House has been trying to shut women up this whole time.
  • Related: Actresses—and Millions of Other Workers—Have No Federal Sexual-Harassment Protections

Trump Is Quietly Making It Even Harder To Report Sexual Harassment And Discrimination

https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/5a15b933150000bb348597be.jpeg?ops=scalefit_720_noupscale

Members of the National Organization for Women hold a rally to call upon Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. to reopen a criminal investigation against Harvey Weinstein. Brendan McDermid / Reuters

  • The White House has been trying to shut women up this whole time.
  • Related: Actresses—and Millions of Other Workers—Have No Federal Sexual-Harassment Protections

Emily Peck, Huffington Post

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http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Stop%20the%20War%20on%20Women%20graphic_1.jpg 11/25/2017 | To the droves of women speaking up about sexual harassment and discrimination, the Trump administration’s message is clear: Shut up.

Behind the scenes, and mostly through executive orders, the White House is making it harder for women to report sexual harassment and fight sex discrimination.

The clearest example came in March. It received little coverage at the time. President Donald Trump reversed an Obama-era order that forbid federal contractors from keeping secret sexual harassment and discrimination cases. The 2014 rule prohibited these companies, which employ about 26 million people, from forcing workers to resolve complaints through arbitration, an increasingly common method businesses use to settle disputes out of the public eye.

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Emily%20Peck%2C%20HuffPost%20Sr.%20Reporter.jpgEmily Peck: Senior Reporter, HuffPost. She covers business, economics and gender inequality. She is a former Wall Street Journal editor and previously worked for The American Lawyer magazine.

Full story … 

Related:

Actresses—and Millions of Other Workers—Have No Federal Sexual-Harassment Protections, Bryce Covert, the Nation

https://www.thenation.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Women-in-Hollywood-2009-rtr-img.jpg?scale=896&compress=80 Actresses present the award for best actress at the Academy Awards in Hollywood, California, on February 22, 2009. (Reuters / Gary Hershom)

  • This is another reason Harvey Weinstein’s accusers may have kept quiet until now.
  • Related: Sexual harassment, assault: Change the story 

 



No Peace! No Justice!  Please share this post.

Actresses—and Millions of Other Workers—Have No Federal Sexual-Harassment Protections

https://www.thenation.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Women-in-Hollywood-2009-rtr-img.jpg?scale=896&compress=80

Actresses present the award for best actress at the Academy Awards in Hollywood, California, on February 22, 2009. (Reuters / Gary Hershom)

  • This is another reason Harvey Weinstein’s accusers may have kept quiet until now.
  • Related: Sexual harassment, assault: Change the story. 

Bryce Covert, the Nation

October 19, 2017 | After The New York Times dropped its bombshell investigation into decades of sexual harassment perpetrated by film producer Harvey Weinstein, and The New Yorker followed up with allegations of not just harassment but sexual assault, dozens of women in Hollywood have come forward with stories about his harassment and abuse. But until these articles were published, Weinstein faced few repercussions for his behavior.

There are a number of reasons most of these women may have decided against reporting what happened to them. Many actresses talked about their fear that Weinstein would exact retribution by blacklisting them in the industry—something some victims said they experienced simply for rebuffing his advances. They likely worried that no one would believe them or take them seriously. One of the few women who did report his behavior to the authorities, Italian model Ambra Battilana Gutierrez, even wore a wiretap and caught Weinstein apparently admitting to assaulting her, only to watch Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. drop her case over what he said was lack of evidence supporting a criminal charge.

http://www.thenation.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/brycecovert_small1.jpg Bryce Covert is a contributor at the Nation and a contributing op-ed writer at the New York Times. Her writing has also appeared in other recognized publications, and she won a 2016 Exceptional Merit in Media Award from the National Women’s Political Caucus.

Full story … 

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Sexual harassment, assault: Change the story, Mariam Williams, National Catholic Reporter 

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Women%27s%20March%2C%20KC%2C%20MO%2C%20Jan.%2021%2C%202016.jpg Participants at the Women's March, Kansas City, Missouri, Jan. 21, 2016 (NCR photo/George Goss)

  • We're not far from the scary world of "The Handmaid's Tale," but we don't have to keep repeating the story. Men in power can demonstrate that women are equal. They can call other men to examine masculinity. They can accept that women and men both desire sex and can control their urges. We can talk about crimes of power and the crime of silence among those who hold it. We can change.
  • Related: From the Archives | Let’s Stop Referring to Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault as ‘Women’s Issues’

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Won't Someone Please Think of the Men?

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A backlash against abusive men in the workplace is in full swing, and men, the poor things, can’t handle it.

Erin Keane, Salon

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11.13.2017 | In the wake of the recent tidal wave of public allegations against Hollywood and media figures — a deluge unleashed initially by meticulous reporting http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Stop%20the%20War%20on%20Women%20graphic_1.jpgby Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey for The New York Times and Ronan Farrow for The New Yorker on the decades of abuse allegations made by what are now dozens of women against movie mogul Harvey Weinstein — men are looking over their shoulders. They feel the ground shifting under their feet. If untouchable comedy hero Louis C.K. can lose his career in two days, what could happen to poor anonymous me? they are asking.

To them I say, I don’t know, what do you think should happen? What reckoning do you, confused and frightened men of the world, personally fear, and why?

Erin Keane is Salon's managing editor.

Full story … 


No Peace! No Justice!  Please share this post.

Sexual harassment, assault: Change the story

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Participants at the Women's March, Kansas City, Missouri, Jan. 21, 2016 (NCR photo/George Goss)

  • We're not far from the scary world of "The Handmaid's Tale," but we don't have to keep repeating the story. Men in power can demonstrate that women are equal. They can call other men to examine masculinity. They can accept that women and men both desire sex and can control their urges. We can talk about crimes of power and the crime of silence among those who hold it. We can change.
  • Related: From the Archives | Let’s Stop Referring to Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault as ‘Women’s Issues’

 

Mariam Williams, National Catholic Reporter

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http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Stop%20the%20War%20on%20Women%20graphic_1.jpgOct 28, 2017 | Lately my favorite way to add gray to my hair is to watch the show "The Handmaid's Tale" on Hulu. Based on the novel by Margaret Atwood, the story is set in a dystopian present in which the United States is a totalitarian nation, a fundamentalist interpretation of the Bible is law, and fertile women are forced to be surrogates for barren women. From what I can tell after seven episodes, all the barren women are married to wealthy men in positions of power. All the characters who aren't "commanders" or their wives are militia, servants or handmaids.

I watch it because a coworker recommended it, though she said it was scary. She didn't mean this in the seasonal, Halloween way. She meant "The Handmaid's Tale" is scary because it's so plausible.

Mariam Williams is a Kentucky writer living in Philadelphia. She holds a Master of Fine Arts degree in creative writing and certificate in public history from Rutgers University-Camden. She is a contributor to the anthology Faithfully Feminist.

Full story … 

Related:

From the Archives | Let’s Stop Referring to Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault as ‘Women’s Issues’, Linda A. Seabrook and Quentin Walcott, Huffington Post

  • We all benefit when responsible men stand in their communities as shining examples of healthy and respectful masculinity.
  • Related: “Dear Kim. Please stop using the term ’empowerment’ when you really mean ‘marketing’.” 

 

http://i.huffpost.com/gen/4267860/images/n-GROUP-OF-MEN-628x314.jpg George Doyle via Getty Images 

04/28/2016 | From reproductive rights to paid family leave to sexual and domestic violence, our society neatly categorizes issues where women bear the brunt of the burden as “women’s issues,” turning them into problems for women and women’s rights advocates alone to solve. But this framing couldn’t be more wrong, and only serves to reinforce the practice of victim blaming that is so pervasive in our society.

As we close another Sexual Assault Awareness Month, we can’t help but wonder — where are the voices of the men? Yes, women are overwhelmingly victims of domestic violence, but men are overwhelmingly perpetrators. It comes down to male behavior and conditioning, so preventing and addressing violence requires men to be engaged in this issue, and take action as well. And breaking the cycle of violence starts with addressing how boys are conditioned to model “male” behavior and attitudes.

Full story … 


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