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Special Report | Managing Climate Change

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  • Part 1: 31 scientific societies just told Congress to take their climate denial and shove it.

The problem, though, is that it's unlikely to do anything to change the toxic dynamic on Capitol Hill or beyond.

  • Part 2: Thanks to upcoming heat wave, July 2016 may become the hottest month on record in the U.S.

Human-caused climate change makes it more likely that warm temperature records will be set. 

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

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Part 1: 31 scientific societies just told Congress to take their climate denial and shove it.

The problem, though, is that it's unlikely to do anything to change the toxic dynamic on Capitol Hill or beyond.

Facts won't carry the day, at least not right now.

Andrew Freedman, Yahoo News

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/ABPub/2011/04/04/2014681395.gifJune 29, 2016 | Scientists have had enough of Congress' climate denial. On Tuesday, a whopping 31 major scientific groups — representing tens of thousands of researchers — delivered a joint letter to Capitol Hill to present a unified front on the seriousness of human-caused global warming and the need to address it.

 

The 3-page letter, which is a more forceful version of a 2009 letter to which 19 scientific societies signed on, comes as the House Science Committee continues to investigate peer reviewed studies of climate change. 

Andrew Freedman is Mashable's Science Editor. Prior to working at Mashable, Freedman was a Senior Science writer for Climate Central. He was ranked as the most prolific climate reporter in the U.S. in 2012, and the second-most prolific in 2013. 

Full story … 



Part 2: Thanks to upcoming heat wave, July 2016 may become the hottest month on record in the U.S.

Human-caused climate change makes it more likely that warm temperature records will be set.

http://i.amz.mshcdn.com/6d8USsPHwcAkNondzEi7dpMbHcw=/950x534/https%3A%2F%2Fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2Fuploads%2Fcard%2Fimage%2F146550%2FHeatWaveJuly2016.jpg Computer model projection of the "misery index" of heat and humidity on July 18, 2016. Image: http://earth.nullschool.net

June 16, 2016 | A noteworthy weather pattern will evolve next week across the lower 48 states, featuring a massive and intense area of high pressure sprawled out across the center of the country, like an annoying partner taking up the entire bed while snoring loudly. 

It's been clear for several days that a prolonged heat wave is coming, particularly for the Plains, portions of the Midwest and Southeast.

Andrew Freedman is Mashable's Science Editor. Prior to working at Mashable, Freedman was a Senior Science writer for Climate Central. He was ranked as the most prolific climate reporter in the U.S. in 2012, and the second-most prolific in 2013. 

Full story … 

A Former Police Chief: Put Down the Big Stick

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There is a long and difficult road ahead of us. We know what it is because we have heard it before for so many years. The 1968 Commission on the Causes and Prevention of Violence (Kerner Commission) identified the problem: we are becoming two societies, one black, one white, separate and unequal. It’s the same today.

David C. Couper, The Progressive

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July 8, 2016 | I keep thinking since the horrific police assassinations in Dallas that we’ve been here before. It’s not that so many police officers have been summarily executed. It’s that a palpable tension still exists between police and black people in our country, despite the efforts of police departments like Dallas to implement community-oriented policing and reduce their use of deadly force.

What were these Dallas officers doing at the time of their deaths? They were protecting the rights of citizens to assemble and protest the bad conduct of other police officers. That is what police in our society do, even knowing that other police are behaving so poorly in cities like Baton Rouge and St. Anthony Village, Minnesota, and too many other cities—bad apples who spoil the police barrel.

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David C. Couper was Madison’s chief of police from 1972 to 1993. Since his retirement, he has attended seminary and was ordained as a priest in the Episcopal Church. He now lives west of Madison and serves a small church in North Lake, Wisconsin. He is the author of Arrested Development: A Veteran Police Chief Sounds Off About Protest, Racism, Corruption and the Seven Steps Necessary to Improve Our Nation’s Police (2012) and How to Rate Your Local Police (2015).

Full story … 

Related: 

'It's Not Us vs. Them' James Hamblin, Atlantic

One police chief's humble solution to violence.

 

How American Politics Went Insane

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  • It happened gradually—and until the U.S. figures out how to treat the problem, it will only get worse.
  • Related: From the Archives | The cult of ignorance in the United States: Anti-intellectualism and the "dumbing down" of America

Jonathan Rauch, The Atlantic 

July / August, 2016 | It’s 2020, four years from now. The campaign is under way to succeed the president, who is retiring after a single wretched term. Voters are angrier than ever—at politicians, at compromisers, at the establishment. Congress and the White House seem incapable of working together on anything, even when their interests align. With lawmaking at a standstill, the president’s use of executive orders and regulatory discretion has reached a level that Congress views as dictatorial—not that Congress can do anything about it, except file lawsuits that the divided Supreme Court, its three vacancies unfilled, has been unable to resolve.

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Paul%20Combs%20%7C%20American%20Electorate-%20A%20Serious%20Thinker%3F%20copy.jpg On Capitol Hill, Speaker Paul Ryan resigned after proving unable to pass a budget, or much else. The House burned through two more speakers and one “acting” speaker, a job invented following four speakerless months. The Senate, meanwhile, is tied in knots by wannabe presidents and aspiring talk-show hosts, who use the chamber as a social-media platform to build their brands by obstructing—well, everything. The Defense Department is among hundreds of agencies that have not been reauthorized, the government has shut down three times, and, yes, it finally happened: The United States briefly defaulted on the national debt, precipitating a market collapse and an economic downturn. No one wanted that outcome, but no one was able to prevent it.

Jonathan Rauch is a contributing editor at The Atlantic and National Journal and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.

Full story … 

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Related:

From the Archives | The cult of ignorance in the United States: Anti-intellectualism and the "dumbing down" of America, Ray Williams, Psychology Today

  • The current trend of increasing anti-intellectualism now establishing itself in politics and business leadership, and supported by a declining education system should be a cause for concern for leaders and the general population, one that needs to be addressed now.
  • Related: Donald Trump Has Given the United States a Great Gift

Legalized Murder and the Politics of Terror

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  • The police kill citizens with impunity, and that is exactly how the system is designed to work. The numerous little police states that exist in poor urban areas across the U.S. are models for a system that would enslave all of us.
  • Related: Philando Castile deserves justice.

Chris Hedges, Nation of Change

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July 11, 2016 | Police officers carry out random acts of legalized murder against poor people of color not because they are racist, although they may be, or even because they are rogue cops, but because impoverished urban communities have evolved into miniature police states.

Police can stop citizens at will, question and arrest them without probable cause, kick down doors in the middle of the night on the basis of warrants for nonviolent offenses, carry out wholesale surveillance, confiscate property and money and hold people—some of them innocent—in county jails for years before forcing them to accept plea agreements that send them to prison for decades. They can also, largely with impunity, murder them.

Chris Hedges, a weekly columnist for Truthdig, is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who has reported from more than 50 countries, specializing in American politics and society. 

Full story … 

Related:

Philando Castile deserves justice, ACLU of Minnesota

  • http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Take%20Action%20Today%20button.jpgJoin this call to action and send Governor Dayton, Attorney General Lori Swanson and Ramsey County Attorney John Choi an email asking for a Special Assistant Attorney General to be appointed immediately.
  • Related: Feds cover up police killing of Jamar Clark, community renews fight for justice.

'You Cannot Use Military Force to Wipe Out Terrorism'

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  • But the problem is, as long as you’re doing the military, the others don’t work. You can’t be bombing people and at the same time think that you’re going to succeed at, quote, “persuading” them, which is one of the great things the Obama administration has talked about wanting to do, persuading them that ISIS is not their friend. Well, it might be easier to persuade them of that if you weren’t killing them. You know, it’s — there’s something illogical there.
  • Janine Jackson interviewed Phyllis Bennis about ISIS attacks for the July 8, 2016, episode of CounterSpin. This is a lightly edited transcript.

Janine Jackson, Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR)

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http://fair.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/phyllis-bennis2.jpgPhyllis Bennis: “You can’t be bombing people and at the same time think that you’re going to succeed at ‘persuading’ them.

July 8, 2016 | Janine Jackson: Early in the morning of Sunday, July 3, a truck bomb exploded in a shopping district in Baghdad. Many of the more than 200 people killed were children shopping for new clothes for Eid Al-Fitr. The group ISIS claimed responsibility.

That was two days after militants claiming fealty to ISIS killed 22 people in Dhaka, Bangladesh, after an 11-hour siege on a cafe. It was five days after at least 42 people were killed in Istanbul’s Ataturk Airport. And it was the day before three separate bomb attacks across Saudi Arabia, including one in the holy city of Medina near a site sacred to Muslims, the mosque where the prophet Mohammed is believed to be buried.

Phyllis Bennis directs the New Internationalism Project at the Institute for Policy Studies. Her most recent book is Understanding ISIS and the New Global War on Terror. Find her article “From Paris to Istanbul: More War on Terror Means More Terrorist Attacks” on Foreign Policy in Focus. 

Full story … 

The Peril Of Our Helplessness

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  • We are facing a series of profound social crises, and … these crises show no signs of diminishing.  And it is precisely for this reason that … we must also deliberately turn our attention to the urgent task of addressing this crisis of democratic action: to recovering our belief that something can be done, that together we can discern what it is, and that together we can do it.    
  • Related: To Strike Fear into the Hearts of Plutocrats ... 
  • Related: 11 Common Ways White Folks Avoid Taking Responsibility for Racism in the US

Gregory Thompson, Huffington Post

https://www.popularresistance.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/People-have-the-power-Ferguson-City-Hall-protest-101-13-14.jpg 07/08/2016 | Like many Americans, I spent last night watching—yet again—the horrifying tragedy of racial violence in our cities. In the span of two traumatic and surreal hours, I sat in my home and watched the murders of three different black men by police officers who seem to many of us to be prodigies of either malice or cluelessness.  And, like many Americans I found myself in the familiar oscillation between grief and anger, self-righteousness and empathy, numbness and nausea.

But this time, in the midst of this familiar oscillation I realized that all of these complex emotions had begun to dissolve into a new singularity.  And what was it?  Helplessness. Having spent hours watching these videos and having spent years thinking about the history of race in America, I sat in my room with only one thought: I have no idea what to do. 

Gregory Thompson: Associate Fellow at the Institute For Advanced Studies in Culture, Executive Director of New City Commons

Full story … 

Related:

To Strike Fear into the Hearts of Plutocrats ... , Pablo MayhewOpEdNews 

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  • If it is such that down we must go, then let's go down fighting. Together. Nothing we do will ever instill more worthy pride within us. And nothing has the potential to make this country stronger than for it to be won back by its rightful heirs. This much I know.
  • A pep talk

###

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11 Common Ways White Folks Avoid Taking Responsibility for Racism in the US, Robin DiAngelo, AlterNet ?Everyday Feminism

  • A structural understanding recognizes racism as a default system that institutionalizes an unequal distribution of resources and power between white people and people of color. This system is historic, taken for granted, deeply embedded, and it works to the benefit of whites.
  • Related: From the Archives | The Bandwagon of Hate: America’s Cancer

 

11 Common Ways White Folks Avoid Taking Responsibility for Racism in the US

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  • A structural understanding recognizes racism as a default system that institutionalizes an unequal distribution of resources and power between white people and people of color. This system is historic, taken for granted, deeply embedded, and it works to the benefit of whites.
  • Related: From the Archives | The Bandwagon of Hate: America’s Cancer

Robin DiAngelo, AlterNet / Everyday Feminism

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http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/iStock_000006868735_Medium-300x199.jpg August 31, 2015 | I am white.

I write and teach about what it means to be white in a society that proclaims race meaningless, yet remains deeply divided by race.

A fundamental, but very challenging part of my work is moving white people from an individual understanding of racism — i.e. only some people are racist and those people are bad — to a structural understanding.

Robin DiAngelo builds a foundation of understanding from the bottom up and really helps the reader to build a framework for racial literacy.

Full story … 

Related:

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Arend%20Van%20Dam%20%7C%20Racism%20in%20America.jpg  From the Archives | The Bandwagon of Hate: America’s Cancer, Odysseus Ward, Angry Humanist

So here I ask that each of us pull our heads out of those fluffy and, mostly white, clouds of privilege and see the world our choices have created. Stop supporting the status quo with silence and quick indictments of the disenfranchised. Stop changing the subject. Stop complaining about our hurt feelings. Stop listening to everyone except the people who are suffering. We either challenge the system and our long held perceptions of the people it harms or do nothing, and thus, contribute to the collapse.

The Future of the Progressive Movement

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  • Bernie Sanders has shifted the goal posts for the Democratic Party.
  • Minimum-wage victories across the country are helping workers take back power.
  • Part 1: What’s Next for the Progressive Movement?
  • Part 2: Building a National People’s Movement

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest



Part 1: What’s Next for the Progressive Movement?

Bernie Sanders has shifted the goal posts for the Democratic Party.

George Goehl, American Prospect / AlterNet

http://www.alternet.org/files/styles/story_image/public/story_images/shutterstock_383931778.jpg New York City - February 27 2016: Hundreds of New Yorkers gathered in Union Square Park to rally and march to Zuccotti Park on behalf of Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders. Photo Credit: a katz/Shutterstock 

July 4, 2016 | When Bernie Sanders announced that he was running for president last year, people didn’t expect much from the Vermont senator. The political establishment wrote him off and the pundits berated him—“he’s a socialist for God’s sake.” Even die-hard progressives conceded his bid was a long shot.

In the months since, Sanders has not only drawn record crowds, he’s earned more than 12 million votes and won 45 percent of pledged delegates. Far and away, he’s done better than any self-declared socialist in our nation’s history. And he funded it all by raising hundreds of millions of dollars in mostly small donations from everyday people.

George Goehl is the executive director of National People’s Action, a network of metropolitan and statewide membership organizations dedicated to advancing economic and racial justice. 

Full story … 



Part 2: Building a National People’s Movement

Minimum-wage victories across the country are helping workers take back power.

Andrew Friedman American Prospect

http://prospect.org/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/fight_for_15_chicago.jpg?itok=YpsPLgkq Fast-food worker Maria Rodriguez joins protesters on the campus of Loyola University in Chicago on April 14, 2016, calling for a union and a $15-per-hour wage. (Photo: AP/Teresa Crawford)

July 8, 2016 | ver the past year, millions of workers have earned a raise as a result of the growing boldness of workers and organizers across the country. The success of the Fight for 15 and similar movements is no accident. Rather, it is the product of years of experimentation, perseverance, and creativity—and today, organizers may have finally hit on a powerful formula for helping workers take back some measure of power.

This success stems first and foremost from a basic reality: The economy in its current state is just not working for Americans. Nearly a decade after the 2008 recession, millions of families around the country have yet to be even touched by the recovery. Wages have stayed flat even as worker productivity has soared. Too many are stuck in jobs that don’t pay the bills, working hard and failing to even stay afloat.

Andrew Friedman is co-executive director of the Center for Popular Democracy.

Full story … 

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