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Mike Luckovich | Obama vs. Stewart / blogs.ajc.com

Section(s): 

It's Jobs or Wars, Not Both

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  • Every military job, every weapons industry job, every war-reconstruction job, every mercenary or torture consultant job appears to be a job, but it is not a job. It is the absence of more and better jobs. It is public money wasted on something worse for job creation than nothing at all and much worse than other available options.
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  • Spending money on the military, even in the United States, hurts the U.S. economy. Spending money on foreign wars is even worse, but all military spending is economically destructive.
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  • The goal? Corporate domination of resources and markets with expanding militarism
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David Swanson, Global Research

Kahlil Bendib
Washington Post's David Broder thinks more war will bring us more jobs. Unlike in Germany, where the president was forced out of office earlier this year for suggesting that war in Afghanistan could benefit the German economy, Americans don't seem to have serious moral qualms about slaughtering human beings for no good reason. We've got three significant wars and a variety of secretive military actions going on now without the slightest mention in our elections. A majority of Americans tell pollsters that the wars should end, but virtually no one tells candidates. However, one has to assume -- for the sake of one's own sanity -- that even Americans, if they knew, would seriously object to further damaging our economy through war and allowing people like David Broder to paper over that process with demonstrably false claims.

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Contrary to partisan myths and stereotypes, U.S. military spending has been on the rise these past two years. And military towns have seen a boom this past decade. But spending money on the military, even in the United States, hurts the U.S. economy. Spending money on foreign wars is even worse, but all military spending is economically destructive. It's worse, economically, than doing nothing. Failing to spend that money and instead cutting taxes would create more jobs than investing it in the military. Investing it in useful industries like mass transit or education would have a much stronger impact and create many more jobs. But even nothing, even cutting taxes, would do less harm than military spending. And that's domestic military spending; spending on foreign wars, funding the Taliban, funding Karzai, misplacing $17 billion, etc., all does even more economic harm.

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The goal? Corporate domination of resources and markets with expanding militarism, Bruce Gagnon, Organizing Notes/Axis of Logic

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  • “Either the Transnational Capitalist Class alliance self-destructs, compelled by the conscious mobilization of the working people in solidarity across the continents, those who oppose war and stand solidly together in a counterforce on the side of humanity, or we go further downhill the slope of lower depths, into an abyss.
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  • For every person there are always two choices in life: to accept things as they are or to accept the responsibility to bring about change – from a war economy to a political economy of peace to share, to preserve our environment and to belong to the commons in which every being has an equal stake for our minimum needs.”
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Section(s): 

There's No Place Like Europe

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  • Steven Hill on Medical House Calls, Multiparty Politics, and Other American Fantasies
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  • Mocking the French for getting it right
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Alissa Bohling, t r u t h o u t

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Lydia Howell

While Europe is far from immune to the economic decline and resource scarcity it faces along with the rest of the world, columnist and author Steven Hill maintains that the continent still leads the globe in building political infrastructures that foster a shared and sustainable prosperity. In his new book, "Europe's Promise: Why the European Way Is the Best Hope in an Insecure Age," Hill heaps plenty of praise on the EU, but when he was invited to address the European Commission during his 12-country, 20-city book tour in Europe this September, he interpreted the honor as an acknowledgment that the world's largest economy knows it still has work to do.

"They're realizing that they're not explaining well what they're doing and why to their own population, to Americans, to a global audience," Hill told Truthout. According to his analysis, that needs to change if we are to accomplish what he describes as the "defining task of the 21st century" - creating and equitably distributing wealth among the world's growing billions without destroying the planet in the process.

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Mocking the French for getting it right, James Clay Fuller, Evergreene Digest
Everything the American public has been told by the corporate news media about the anti-austerity uprisings in France, England and other European countries is a lie.
There's No Place Like Europe

Section(s): 

An Extreme Makeover

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  • During the current campaign season, many Republican candidates have pushed to revive failed and unpopular policies from the GOP past, such as eliminating the Department of Education or privatizing Social Security.
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  • Disaster is just days away
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Progress Report, Think Progress

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During the current campaign season, many Republican candidates have pushed to revive failed and unpopular policies from the GOP past, such as eliminating the Department of Education or privatizing Social Security. "We need to get back to transferring many of the powers of the federal government to the states," said Alaska's Republican Senate nominee Joe Miller, calling for the abolition of Social Security as we know it. "I'd start by eliminating the U.S. Department of Education at a cost of $50 billion and then move on to Housing and Urban Development," said Utah Republican Senate nominee Mike Lee.

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Lee's call was echoed by Nevada's Republican Senate nominee Sharron Angle, who said, "I would like to go through to the elimination. I think we start by defunding it, and the reason that we should eliminate it is because its not the federal government's job to provide education for our children." And these newcomers to the national political stage may find many sympathetic ears in the incumbent Congress, as the GOP's shift to the right and embrace of the Tea Party has caused it to espouse an extreme anti-government zeal. These ideas -- and others becoming part of the mainstream right wing, like ending the 14th amendment's guarantee of birthright citizenship -- highlight the extreme policy positions that have come to define the modern-day conservative movement and the candidates that it has adopted.

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Disaster is just days away, Paul Krugman, New York Times | NY

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  • Future historians will probably look back at the 2010 election as a catastrophe for America, one that condemned the nation to years of political chaos and economic weakness
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  • Divided we fail
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  • Eight False Things The Public “Knows” Prior To Election Day
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Section(s): 

Disaster is just days away

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  • Future historians will probably look back at the 2010 election as a catastrophe for America, one that condemned the nation to years of political chaos and economic weakness
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  • Divided we fail
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  • Eight False Things The Public “Knows” Prior To Election Day
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Paul Krugman, New York Times | NY

If you like reading this article, consider contributing a cuppa jove to Evergreene Digest--using the donation button in the above right-hand corner—so we can bring you more just like it.

Future historians will probably look back at the 2010 election as a catastrophe for America, one that condemned the nation to years of political chaos and economic weakness control of at least one house of Congress next week. How worried should we be by that prospect?

Not very, say some pundits. After all, the last time Republicans controlled Congress while a Democrat lived in the White House was the period from the beginning of 1995 to the end of 2000. And people remember that era as a good time of rapid job creation and responsible budgets. Can we hope for a similar experience now?

No, we can't. This is going to be terrible. Future historians will probably look back at the 2010 election as a catastrophe for America, one that condemned the nation to years of political chaos and economic weakness.

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Eight False Things The Public “Knows” Prior To Election Day, Dave Johnson, Campaign for America's Future

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  • If the public votes in a new Congress that rejects the idea of helping to create demand in the economy because they think it didn't work, then the new Congress could do things that cause a depression.
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  • This stuff really matters.
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  • Five Things People "Know"
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  • People Are Allergic to the Facts
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September Jobs Report Reveals America’s Emerging Third World Economy

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  • September Jobs: American Worker Displacement At Record High
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  • New Figures Detail Depth Of Unemployment Misery, Lower Earnings For All But Super Wealthy
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Paul Craig Roberts, Information Clearing House

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For a number of years I reported on the monthly nonfarm payroll jobs data. The data did not support the praises economists were singing to the "New Economy." The "New Economy" consisted, allegedly, of financial services, innovation, and high-tech services.

This economy was taking the place of the old "dirty fingernail" economy of industry and manufacturing. Education would retrain the workforce, and we would move on to a higher level of prosperity.

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September Jobs: American Worker Displacement At Record High, Edwin S. Rubenstein, VDare.com

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  • The economy lost 95,000 more jobs in September, as state and local governments downsized at a faster rate than the private sector expanded.
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  • The drop was much larger than the 8,000 decline expected by economists and far outstripped the 57,000 lost in August.
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New Figures Detail Depth Of Unemployment Misery, Lower Earnings For All But Super Wealthy, Huffington Post
Those Americans earning more than $50 million increased their income from an average of $91.2 million in 2008 to almost $519 million. That's nearly $10 million in weekly pay!These 74 people made as much as the 19 million lowest-paid people in America, who constitute one in every eight workers."

Section(s): 

Attack on the Middle Class

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The Long Con
Attention tea partiers: The head you're putting on the chopping block may be your own.
By Monika Bauerlein and Clara Jeffery

Attack on the Middle Class!!
First they came after your paycheck. Then your house. What's next?
By James K. Galbraith

Will Obama Put Up a Fight?
How Obama lost control of the economic message.
By David Corn

Invasion of the Brain-Devouring Platitudes
Five election-year memes I never want to hear again. Ever.
By Kevin Drum

Adventures of Unemployed Man
Quick, free marketeers! Deploy the social safety net!
By Erich Origen and Gan Golan

Attack of the 50-Foot Palin<>
The B movie classic behind this issue's Mother Jones cover.
By Clara Jeffery and Monika Bauerlein

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Indiana parents told drop disabled kids at shelters

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  • Daunna Minnich of Bloomington said Indiana Department of Education funding for residential treatment for her 18-year-old daughter, Sabrina, is due to run out Sunday. She said officials at Damar Services Inc. of Indianapolis told her during a meeting that unless she took Sabrina home with her, the agency would drop the teen off at a homeless shelter.
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  • "It's heart-wrenching as a parent to watch it. We are people and they are people," Becky Holladay said, referring to her son and others with disabilities. "They have lives that are worth something."
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  • Anti-tax fervor undermines the common good
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Ken Kusmer, Associated Press/MSNBC

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Twenty-two year old Cameron Dunn waits in his step-father Ron Holladay's truck while Holladay goes to work in Battle Ground, Ind., Wednesday, Oct. 27, 2010. Dunn suffers epilepsy, autism, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. His mother Becky Holladay says that when she called Indiana's Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services to ask about a Medicaid waiver to pay for services that support disabled people living independently, a bureau worker told her that leaving severely disabled people at homeless shelters is one option families have if they can't be cared for at home.

Indiana's budget crunch has become so severe that some state workers have suggested leaving severely disabled people at homeless shelters if they can't be cared for at home, parents and advocates said.

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They said workers at Indiana's Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services have told parents that's one option they have when families can no longer care for children at home and haven't received Medicaid waivers that pay for services that support disabled people living independently.

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Anti-tax fervor undermines the common good, Neal Peirce, Syndicated columnist, Seattle Times | WA

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  • Facing yawning deficits, many years of tough sacrifice and reckoning lie ahead of us. But to use that as an excuse to eviscerate government functions left and right, or push down taxes just when government needs them to remain solvent, represents a strange kind of patriotism.
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  • The Myths of Austerity
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  • Hey Tea Party-Republicans: The Founders Are Not Your Guy
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