You are here

Law & Justice

Monte Wolverton | Sessions vs. Brown / politicalcartoons.com

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Monte%20Wolverton%20%7C%20Sessions%20vs.%20Brown.jpg

Section(s): 

To Protect and Serve ~ Norm Stamper

 

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51Rsl37BzQL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

  • How to Fix America’'s Police
  • A vivid, well-written, vitally important book.
  • Related: Special Report | Curbing Police Brutality

Kirkus Reviews 

June 7, 2016 | Most of the nation's approximately 18,000 police departments receive scathing criticism from one of their own: an author who began as a San Diego beat cop in 1966 and rose to become a police chief in Seattle.

Stamper follows up his first book (Breaking Rank: A Top Cop's Exposé of the Dark Side of American Policing, 2005) with a more contemporary—and more critical—account. He concludes that police departments as currently structured—akin to military units with force as a dominant characteristic—must be rebuilt. The author recognizes that almost every police agency includes a majority of uniformed officers and plainclothes detectives who place polite, effective service above brute force. However, he maintains, the rogue cops, although a minority, too often exercise undue influence, infecting everybody with their negative attitudes toward minority and mentally ill citizens, who deserve respect rather than stigmatizing.

The author does not shy away from specific incidents of unarmed citizens killed by police; he explains, for example, why Michael Brown should never have died in Ferguson, Missouri.

Norm Stamper is an American former chief of police and writer known for his role as Chief of the Seattle Police Department ( 1994-2000) responsible for Seattle's response to the protests of the WTO Ministerial Conference of 1999, which eventually led to his resignation.

Kirkus Reviews is an American book review magazine founded in 1933 by Virginia Kirkus. The magazine is headquartered in New York City.

Full story … 

Related:

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Donate.jpg





 

Special Report | Curbing Police Brutality, Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

  • http://cdn.thinkprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/30163700/Police-Have-Not-Been-Held-Accountable3-1125x635.jpgPart 1: New study finds body cameras do not curb police brutality
    • Even with eyes watching, some cops continue to cross the line.
  • Part 2: The Fraternal Order of Police Must Go
    • The nation’s largest police organization pursues policies that have deadly consequences for communities of color.

http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PlsShareArrow5.png

 

Special Report | Curbing Police Brutality

http://cdn.thinkprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/30163700/Police-Have-Not-Been-Held-Accountable3-1125x635.jpg

  • Part 1: New study finds body cameras do not curb police brutality

  • Even with eyes watching, some cops continue to cross the line.
  • Part 2: The Fraternal Order of Police Must Go
  • The nation’s largest police organization pursues policies that have deadly consequences for communities of color.

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/We%20Haven%27t%20Put%20Up%20a%20Paywall_0.jpg



Part 1: New study finds body cameras do not curb police brutality

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Police%20Brutality%20During%20An%20Arrest.jpg

Even with eyes watching, some cops continue to cross the line.

Rachel Leah, Salon

10.24.2017 | Since the death of Mike Brown in 2014, high-profile police killings of unarmed black people spurred a national debate over excessive police force and accountability. In response, many police departments adopted body cameras as a solution, whether by choice or whether by mandates from their municipalities.

But a study conducted in Washington, D.C. found that body cameras had little impact on an officer's behavior.

Rachel Leah: a culture writer for Salon, who also writes about race and criminal justice. She holds an MA in journalism and Africana studies from NYU.

Full story … 



 

Part 2: The Fraternal Order of Police Must Go

The nation’s largest police organization pursues policies that have deadly consequences for communities of color.
Paul Butler, The Marshall Project / the Nation

https://www.thenation.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Donald-Trump-Fraternal-Order-Police-rtr-img.jpg?scale=896&compress=80  Donald Trump speaks to the Fraternal Order of Police on August 18, 2016. The organization endorsed him for president. (Reuters / Carlo Allegri)

October 11, 2017 | “A pack of rabid animals.” That’s how John McNesby, president of the Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police, described local Black Lives Matter activists who picketed outside the home of a Philly cop who shot black suspects in the back on two separate occasions. After the officer was suspended, the local FOP had a fund-raiser for him, with proceeds from the $40-per-ticket event going toward the officer’s living expenses.

McNesby made the remarks at a Back the Blue rally in August, and caught heat for his choice of words. It wasn’t the first time. Another Philly cop made headlines last year for having a tattoo of a spread-winged eagle under the word “Fatherland.” McNesby defended the cop’s apparent shout-out to the official emblem of the Nazi Party, saying the tattoo was “not a big deal.”

Paul Butler, a former federal prosecutor, is the Bennett Boskey Visiting Professor at Harvard Law School and the Albert Brick Professor in Law at Georgetown University. He is the author of Chokehold: Policing Black Men.
The Marshall Project: a nonpartisan, nonprofit news organization covering the US criminal justice system.

Full story … 

http://www.truth-out.org/images/email_this_story_640.gif

Envisioning An America Free From Police Violence and Control

https://cdn01.theintercept.com/wp-uploads/sites/1/2017/10/alex-vitale-end-of-policing-book-1507910214-article-header.jpg

  • In “The End of Policing,” Alex S. Vitale argues that police reforms implemented in the wake of Michael Brown’s death in Ferguson, Missouri — from diversity initiatives to community policing to body cameras — fail to acknowledge that policing as an institution reinforces race and class inequalities by design.
  • Related: 4 Disabled People Dead in Another Week of Police Brutality

Rashmee Kumar, The Intercept 

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Jay Kvale 

 

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/If%20You%20Use%20it%2C%20Contribute%20To%20It%20banner.jpg

https://cdn-ed.versobooks.com/images/000010/546/9781784782894-5a539d7f727ddb71411f1c7ca7930d80.jpg October 15 2017 | Images from the mass protests in St. Louis last month against the acquittal of a white former police officer in the fatal shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith felt like déjà vu: raised fists, Black Lives Matter signs, swarms of police armed in full riot gear. But this time, as police made arrests on the third night of protests, they began to chant “Whose streets, our streets” — a refrain that, stolen from the voices of protesters, mutated into an unsettling declaration of power, entitlement, and impunity.

So far this year, 773 people have been fatally shot by police, according to the Washington Post, while independent databases that include other causes of death by police report tolls above 900. In the three years since the flashpoint of Michael Brown’s shooting in Ferguson, Missouri, pushes for reform have reverberated through all levels of government, most notably from former President Barack Obama’s policing task force. And yet, much like gun violence itself, police brutality in the United States remains stuck on repeat. A new book published last week goes beyond the rhetoric of reform to interrogate why we need police at all.

https://cdn01.theintercept.com/wp-uploads/sites/1/2017/10/Rashmee-Kumar_avatar_1508025504-1508025504..jpg Rashmee Kumar is the copy editor at The Intercept. She has previously worked at Guardian US, NJ Advance Media, and the Star-Ledger. She graduated from Rutgers University with a B.A. in journalism and media studies.

Full story … 

Related:

4 Disabled People Dead in Another Week of Police Brutality, David M. Perry, The Nation 

https://www.thenation.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/police-brutality-mentally-il-ap-img.jpg?scale=896&compress=80 Supporters hold up signs during a 2014 protest in support of Kelly Thomas, a mentally ill homeless man who died after a violent confrontation with Fullerton police. (AP Photo / Mark J. Terrill)

  • Police don’t need better training; they need to stop treating noncompliance as justification for violence.
  • Related: It's Time for People with No Country to be Unapologetically Selfish and Intolerant.

http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PlsShareArrow5.png

 


 

4 Disabled People Dead in Another Week of Police Brutality

https://www.thenation.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/police-brutality-mentally-il-ap-img.jpg?scale=896&compress=80

Supporters hold up signs during a 2014 protest in support of Kelly Thomas, a mentally ill homeless man who died after a violent confrontation with Fullerton police. (AP Photo / Mark J. Terrill)

  • Police don’t need better training; they need to stop treating noncompliance as justification for violence.
  • Related: It's Time for People with No Country to be Unapologetically Selfish and Intolerant.

David M. Perry, The Nation

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Subscribe%20logo%20with%2011%20Yr%20Banner_0.jpg To stay on top of important articles like these, sign up here to receive the latest updates from all reader supported Evergreene Digest

 



http://cdn.thinkprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/30163700/Police-Have-Not-Been-Held-Accountable3-1125x635.jpg September 22, 2017 | Magdiel Sanchez, a 35-year-old Latino man, was sitting on his porch in Oklahoma City on Tuesday night as two law-enforcement officers approached his house. He got up and walked toward them, when, according to news reports and a statement, the officers noticed he was holding a metal pipe. They started giving him “verbal commands” to lie down, then one fired his Taser and the other shot him in the chest with his sidearm. Sanchez died. Officers later claimed not to have heard neighbors shouting that Sanchez was deaf and couldn’t hear their commands.

The police were there because allegedly Sanchez’s father had been in a hit-and-run (injuring property, not people, if the accusations are true). Sanchez carried the pipe, neighbors said, to ward off dogs. He was deaf and reportedly developmentally disabled. In a statement, the ACLU said, “Magdiel Sanchez was shot at his own home, without having committed any crime, and in front of neighbors who knew he was deaf trying to communicate to the police that what they were about to do was wrong.”

David M. Perry is a journalist and historian. His blog is How Did We Get Into This Mess.

Full story … 

Related:

http://thehill.com/sites/default/files/styles/thumb_small_article/public/blogs/disability_0.jpg?itok=KVH6qmxv Getty Images

It's Time for People with No Country to be Unapologetically Selfish and Intolerant, Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

  • Part 1: No country for people with disabilities
  • The United States of America would become no country for those with disabilities — even as those savings are handed over to those who already live luxurious lifestyles. (These cuts) would make this a country in which children and adults with disabilities are no longer welcome.
  • Part 2: It’s Time for Disabled People to be Unapologetically Selfish and Intolerant
  • If you’re wondering why I’m asking you to be these things, the answer is very simple: you are a real person, not an idea or concept.
  • Related: Special Project | Disability: Disabled, Shunned and Silenced in Trump’s America

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Attention%20banner.jpg


 

 

 

 

Help grow the movement! Share this story with your friends.

 

Thurgood Marshall: Activist, judge and the story for racial justice in America

https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/7a4fe2f4a8e33583ee22679338f05ffe9f702acc/0_187_5560_3337/master/5560.jpg?w=300&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=84b41faf5f3b7305e63bba9ad5bfdf6d

 

  • The first African American to sit on the highest court is the subject of a film that retells his relentless and epochal quest to achieve racial justice in America.
  • Related: Death by Cop: Black and White Issues

Tom McCarthy, The Guardian

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/We%20Haven%27t%20Put%20Up%20a%20Paywall_0.jpg


http://i.huffpost.com/gen/209360/thumbs/s-SCALES-OF-JUSTICE-large.jpg   Sunday 8 October 2017 | By the time the US supreme court banned the death penalty in cases of adult rape, in 1977, Thurgood Marshall had been a justice on the court for 10 years. He wrote a brief concurrence in the case, Coker v Georgia, citing his opposition to the death penalty, which then as now disproportionately targeted African American men.

Marshall’s experience with capital rape cases, and specifically with cases of black men accused of raping white women, was uniquely deep. For while the later decades of his career found Marshall enrobed as the country’s first African American supreme court justice, in his early years he had virtually lived from a suitcase, crossing the country as an activist lawyer known for defending innocent black men from a system of white justice that craved their freedom and their blood.

https://i.guim.co.uk/img/static/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2015/8/31/1441007677105/Tom-McCarthy.jpg?w=140&h=140&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=a1909525d2a830a50e056d5e65afcf88 Tom McCarthy joined the Guardian US in 2012. He was previously the news writer on ABC News's Nightline. He has worked at the Daily Star (Beirut) and the Omaha World-Herald.

Full story … 

Related:

Death by Cop: Black and White Issues, Glen Ford, Black Agenda Report / Truthdig 

  • U.S. police kill more Black women every year than the total of all civilians killed annually by their counterparts in western Europe’s largest countries. These sisters’ male relatives are slaughtered on an epic scale—with the connivance and consent of most of the Congressional Black Caucus, 80 percent of whose members voted to continue the militarization of local police when the issue came up for a vote on the full House floor in June of 2014.
  • Related: After Minneapolis police shooting of Justine Damond, it's time to decide who runs this town.

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Attention%20banner.jpg


Help grow the movement! Share this story with your friends.

Battlefield America, Not the Rule of Law, Is the New Normal.

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Police%20with%20Military%20Weaponry.jpg

 

  • Part 1: Dangers Are Coming to the Rule of Law
    • Has President Trump ever focused his variegated thought processes long enough to read the Constitution end to end?
  • Part 2: Battlefield America Is the New Normal.
    • We’re Not in Mayberry Anymore.

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Subscribe%20logo%20with%2011%20Yr%20Banner_0.jpgTo stay on top of important articles like these, sign up here to receive the latest updates from all reader supported Evergreene Digest.  

 



Part 1: Dangers Are Coming to the Rule of Law, by Andrew J. Napolitano

Has President Trump ever focused his variegated thought processes long enough to read the Constitution end to end? “No way” is the betting favorite.

Andrew J. Napolitano, lewrockwell.com / Straight Line Logic 

https://img.washingtonpost.com/wp-apps/imrs.php?src=https://img.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/files/2016/02/JailJobs1.jpg&w=1484August 31, 2017 | Amid the bad news this summer of racial tensions in Charlottesville and biblical-like floods in Houston and preening saber rattling between Pyongyang and Washington, a dangerous below-the-radar trend has been developing about which all who believe that the Constitution means what it says should be concerned. It is the reckless influence upon local law enforcement coming from the Trump administration.
Here is the back story.

Andrew J. Napolitano is an American syndicated columnist whose work appears in numerous publications, such as Fox News, The Washington Times, and Reason. 

Full story … 



 

Part 2: Battlefield America Is the New Normal.

  • If you turn the police into a military unit, who do they fight? Pat yourself on the back if you guessed the American people. “If we’re training cops as soldiers, giving them equipment like soldiers, dressing them up as soldiers, when are they going to pick up the mentality of soldiers?”— Arthur Rizer, former police officer
  • We’re Not in Mayberry Anymore.

John W. Whitehead, The Rutherford Institute / Straight Line Logic  

http://cdn.thinkprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/30163700/Police-Have-Not-Been-Held-Accountable3-1125x635.jpg August 29, 2017 | America, you’ve been fooled again.

While the nation has been distracted by a media maelstrom dominated by news of white supremacists, Powerball jackpots, Hurricane Harvey, and a Mayweather v. McGregor fight, the American Police State has been carving its own path of devastation and destruction through what’s left of the Constitution.

We got sucker punched.

John W. Whitehead is an attorney and author who has written, debated and practiced widely in the area of constitutional law and human rights.

Full story … 

http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PlsShareArrow5.png

 

Police Anarchy and Technology and Criminal Justice

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Rights%20%26%20Liberties%20Banner_0.jpg

  • Part 1: Chris Hedges: The Collapse of the American Judicial System
    • Chris Hedges discusses restoring America’s justice system with legal scholar Edgar Cahn.
  • Part 2: Why Technology Will Not Solve Our Criminal Justice Problems
    • In the context of criminal justice, America’s faith in technological interventions is worse than misplaced; it is dangerous.

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

Part 1: Chris Hedges: The Collapse of the American Judicial System

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4425/36389919605_8316c54ef4_z.jpg Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr
RT America <https://www.rt.com/on-air/rt-america-air/>

Aug 5, 2017 | On this week’s episode of On Contact, Chris Hedges discusses restoring America’s justice system with legal scholar Edgar Cahn. Cahn is a law professor, former counsel and speechwriter to Robert F. Kennedy, and co-founder of the Antioch School of Law which placed emphasis on serving the poor and trained prospective lawyers in social activism. RT Correspondent Anya Parampil examines the collapse of our legal system.

RT America broadcasts news reports, features and talk shows with a totally different perspective from the mainstream American television. We delve deep into the most important issues on the US agenda, report the other side of the story, and explore unanswered – and unasked – questions.

Full story … 


Part 2: Why Technology Will Not Solve Our Criminal Justice Problems

https://www.paypal.com/en_US/i/btn/btn_donateCC_LG.gif  Bringing the movement to you

Let's give a voice to those fighting for a better world.

Click here to donate. 

Despite (and in reaction to) all the hate, fear and bluster emanating from the White House, there are powerful movements building across the country.

Evergreene Digest has doubled down to give voice to those fighting for a better world. We've worked tirelessly to bring the movement to you.

But in order to continue publishing in-depth, thoughtful coverage of local and national efforts to disrupt the status quo, we need your help. Because Truthout is funded almost entirely by readers, the success of our fundraising campaign is critical to our future: Can you take a moment to get us closer to our goal? 

Thank you for your support,

Dave & The Crew



https://uziiw38pmyg1ai60732c4011-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/dropzone/2017/08/Screen-Shot-2017-08-01-at-9.15.58-PM.png Photo by Dave Nakayama | CC BY 2.0

In the context of criminal justice, America’s faith in technological interventions is worse than misplaced; it is dangerous.

Jennifer L. Lieberman, Counterpunch / Rise Up Times

Auguist 2, 2017 | Technological and scientific interventions in criminal justice are not always newsworthy enough to draw our attention away from urgent and sensational issues on Capitol Hill. But when a jail in Tennessee promotes sterilization by offering reduced sentences to men who volunteer to have vasectomies, we have to pay attention. The problem is not that one jail implemented a terrible eugenicist policy; it is that stakeholders in the criminal justice system are consistently looking for scientific and technological solutions to social problems, forgetting that—as fivethirtyeight contributor Laura Hudson writes— “technology is biased too.”
In the context of criminal justice, America’s faith in technological interventions is worse than misplaced; it is dangerous.

Full story … 

http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PlsShareArrow5.png

 

Pages

Subscribe to Law &amp; Justice