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Stuart Carlson | Creating a Wingnut / Slate.com

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Less Is Not More

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  • Why do newspapers alienate their most loyal readers?
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  • The American Media Misdiagnosis
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  • Save the Press
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Lisa Anderson, Columbia Journalism Review

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Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Will Shapira

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When my son’s first college roommate turned out to be from Chicago, I was delighted. His family had long subscribed to the Chicago Tribune, where I worked. I thought it gave us an immediate connection. Less than two months later, they unsubscribed. This was shortly after a drastic redesign at the paper in September 2008. The roommate’s family said there was nothing in the Tribune to read anymore.

That wasn’t quite true. There was still plenty of information in the paper. But there were fewer stories, produced by fewer reporters. The stories were relentlessly local and, increasingly, came in the form of charts, graphs, maps, statistics, large fonts, and large photos—a sort of newspaper-Internet-TV amalgam that seemed more like something to be absorbed than read. For the roommate’s family—professional people who wanted sophisticated stories that included the world beyond Chicago—it wasn’t enough.

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The American Media Misdiagnosis, Robert Parry, ConsortiumNews.com
It’s widely agreed that there are a number of factors dragging down American newspapers, but a reason rarely mentioned is that the national news media failed in its most important job – to serve as a watchdog for the people.

Save the Press, Timothy Egan, New York Times | NY
Those who revel in the life-threatening trauma that newspapers are going through miss the point. People are not deserting these complex and contradictory summaries of our collective existence. It's the business model that needs to be figured out.

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How the Media Created a Monster: Sarah Palin

The preposterous media coverage of the (few) unhappy Hillaryites at the Dem convention—which was aimed not at helping Obama but maintaining interest in the affair and the coming campaign—inspired McCain to select as his running mate someone who would virtually destroy his campaign.

Greg Mitchell, The Nation

It's often said these days that Sarah Palin is a "media creation." That is, the media promote and elevate her as one of America's most popular and influential leaders, even though her approval ratings remain in the tank, by covering every appearance and statement (whether speech or tweet) as if she is the Junior President from Alaska.

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But the "creation" part goes well beyond what's happened since the 2008 campaign to keep her constantly in the public eye. It's my view that she was created by the media even before John McCain picked her as his Veep candidate.

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It fact, it was exactly two years ago this week that a true (if rarely recognized) turning point in the 2008 race for the White House arrived. It came at the Democratic convention in Denver. No, it was not the good vibes about Obama, the ringing speeches by Teddy Kennedy, Michelle Obama, Bill and Hill, or by the candidate himself.

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Franken: Net Neutrality “Biggest Issue Since Freedom of Religion”

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  • “Net Neutrality is the biggest issue since Freedom of Religion, which until last week I thought we had worked out” – Senator Al Franken
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  • Full video of the Minneapolis FCC hearing on August 19 can be found here.
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  • The Internet: Wired to whose advantage?
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The Uptake

Al Franken is the only U.S. Senator with firsthand knowledge of TV networks. That knowledge has helped him forge a forceful argument about megamergers such as Google/Verizon and Comcast/Viacom. These mergers would abolish Net Neutrality, or equal access to the Internet, despite the content or the size of the customer.

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“A corporation’s only obligation is to its bottom line, not to you and me” said Franken.

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He spoke August 19 at a public hearing in Minneapolis on the future of the Internet .

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Full video of the FCC hearing can be found here.

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The Internet: Wired to whose advantage? Donna Champion and Nicole Palya Wood, Star Tribune | MN

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  • Proposed regulation could decrease incentives for private-sector investment in broadband build-out.
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  • An open Internet for all
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The Internet: Wired to whose advantage?


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Proposed regulation could decrease incentives for private-sector investment in broadband build-out.
An open Internet for all

Donna Champion and Nicole Palya Wood, Star Tribune | MN

The benefits of broadband technology are undeniable. However, about 6 percent of Minnesota's homes have little or no access to broadband Internet. In May, state officials passed a law setting a goal to give every resident access to a high-speed broadband connection by 2015.

Minnesota has been awarded about $60 million in federal Recovery Act funds to help extend broadband services in the state. While these funds will help provide broadband access to thousands of households, businesses and community facilities in 11 rural Minnesota counties, government can't be expected to bear the full cost of rural broadband deployment.

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An open Internet for all, Mignon Clyburn and Michael J. Copps, Star Tibune | MN
The power must be in the hands of consumers, because corporations will press their advantage if they can.

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CNN Most Trusted Name in News?

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  • Political analysts Hilary Rosen, Alex Castellanos tied to BP oil
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  • CNN Situation Room Social Security Scaremongering
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  • Should CNN cede its trademark as the Most Trusted Name in News to the Huffington Post?
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Frank DiGiacomo, New York Daily News | NY

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Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Thomas Sklarski

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Hilary Rosen has reportedly done work for oil giant BP but is also employed by CNN. Morigi/WireImage

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Despite poor ratings, the cable news network that Ted Turner founded in 1980 has long prided itself on journalistic integrity. But media insiders say CNN's continued ties to lobbyists and special-interest consultants - whom it bills as political analysts - now threaten its sterling reputation. And one source says the network's parent company, Time Warner, is paying close attention to the matter.

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Two names that repeatedly come up are Hilary Rosen, a former recording-industry lobbyist who was hired to be a D.C. navigator for public relations consulting firm The Brunswick Group, and Alex Castellanos, a founder of public-affairs PR firm Purple Strategies. As political blogger Greg Sargent reported in the Plumline Monday, BP has retained the services of Rosen, a Democrat, who has farmed out some of the work to her fellow CNN talking head Castellanos, a Republican.

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CNN Situation Room Social Security Scaremongering, Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR)

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  • CNN's Social Security 'crisis'
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  • Ask CNN's Situation Room to bring on Social Security experts who would challenge the alarmist views featured recently on the show.
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  • Top 5 Social Security Myths
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FCC should reject the Google-Verizon net-neutrality plan

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  • The Google and Verizon net-neutrality plan is bad policy that will only benefit the two companies. The FCC should quickly reject the proposal.
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  • Stop Google And Verizon From Setting Our Public Internet Policy
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Ryan Blethen, Seattle Times | WA

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The only thing transparent about the Google and Verizon plan for net neutrality is how disingenuous it is.

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The proposal from the two outsized corporations would essentially starve the open Internet in favor of a well-maintained, pay-to-play Internet and completely wall off wireless Internet from even the most minimal open-access rules.

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What I find most maddening about the Google-Verizon plan is that it could have been headed off if not for the lethargy of the Federal Communications Commission, the regulatory agency charged to work in the public's interest. Google and Verizon filled the void with a proposal that would harm consumers and restrict innovation while ceding control of the Internet to broadband oligarchs.

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Stop Google And Verizon From Setting Our Public Internet Policy, The Pen

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  • Since when is it the place of special interest corporations to determine what public policy should be?
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  • Tell Google: Don't be evil
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  • FCC Hearing on Net Neutrality Comes to Minneapolis Thursday August 19
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FCC Hearing on Net Neutrality Comes to Minneapolis Thursday August 19

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  • Since when is it the place of special interest corporations to determine what public policy should be?
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  • Stop Google And Verizon From Setting Our Public Internet Policy
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  • Tell Google: Don't be evil
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Andy Driscoll and Lynnell Mickelsen, Truth to Tell
, KFAI-FM

“The FCC recently announced that up to 24 million Americans don't have access to broadband. The exclusion of millions of people from the defining technology of our time only widens the existing gulf between those that have and those that don't. Everyday people like you and me must have a voice in shaping the future of the Internet. This hearing will give members of the public the chance to communicate their ideas, experiences and concerns directly to the commissioners.” – Amalia Deloney, grassroots policy director for the Center for Media Justice.

A recent court decision left the FCC’s authority over Internet providers in legal limbo. Without this authority, the agency cannot protect Net Neutrality, the principle that guarantees free speech online, and cannot ensure that every American has access to affordable broadband service.

In a recent speech, Minnesota Sen. Al Franken called Net Neutrality “the free speech issue of our time.”

The FCC will hear from Minnesotans on Future of Internet Thursday, Aug 19 at Minneapolis' South High School (map). TruthToTell's Andy Driscoll and Lynnell Mickelsen explore the issues and testimony Minnesota media justice types will deliver to Federal Communications Commissioners Michael Copps and Mignon Clyburn at a hearing on the future of the Internet on August 19 at 6PM at South High School Auditorium in Minneapolis.

Guests: Steve Renderos, Media Justice Coordinator, Main Street Project
Margaret Kaplan, Operations Director, MN Center for Neighborhood Organizing (CURA)
Chaka Mkali, Director of Organizing and Community Building, Hope Community, Minneapolis
Laura Waterman Wittstock, Author, Consultant, Co-Producer/Host - First Person Radio (KFAI)

Broadcast: in Minneapolis/St. Paul KFAI-90.3/106.7/Streamed @ KFAI.org 9-10AM, Monday, August 16

Archived: Click here

Related:

Tell Google: Don't be evil, Credo Action

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  • Google-Verizon Deal: The End of The Internet as We Know It
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  • Hightower: Big biz wants to own the information superhighway while We the People bump along the backroads
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  • Progressive Media - Including Evergreene Digest - Needs Your Help
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Stop Google And Verizon From Setting Our Public Internet Policy, The Pen

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  • Since when is it the place of special interest corporations to determine what public policy should be?
  • \r\n

  • Tell Google: Don't be evil
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