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Archbishop Nienstedt Responds to A Catholic Gay Mother's Concerns

  • "I urge you to reconsider the position you expressed in your letter. Your eternal salvation may well depend upon a conversion of heart on this topic."
  • Child abuse in my church

Truth Wins Out
 
Thanks to Evergreene Digest reader Cynthia Orange for this contribution

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Related:

Child abuse in my church, Jeff Weis, Change.org

  • Bishop Robert Finn: Resign as Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Kansas City - St. Joseph, MO.
  • Denying communion to those who disagree
     

Charlie Fuqua, Arkansas Legislative Candidate, Endorses Death Penalty For Rebellious Children

  • "I think my views are fairly well-accepted by most people," Fuqua said to AP.
  • 5 Crazy Things the GOP Is Still Saying About Women, Rape and Abortion

John Celock, Huffington Post

This article is made possible with the generous contributions of
all reader supported Evergreene Digest readers like you. Thank you!

October 7, 2012 | Charlie Fuqua, the Republican candidate for the Arkansas House of Representatives who called for expelling Muslims from the United States in his book, also wrote in support for instituting the death penalty for "rebellious children."

In "God's Law," Fuqua's 2012 book, the candidate wrote that while parents love their children, a process could be set up to allow for the institution of the death penalty for "rebellious children," according to the Arkansas Times. Fuqua, who is anti-abortion, points out that the course of action involved in sentencing a child to death is described in the Bible and would involve judicial approval. While it is unlikely that many parents would seek to have their children killed by the government, Fuqua wrote, such power would serve as a way to stop rebellious children.

Full story...

Related:

5 Crazy Things the GOP Is Still Saying About Women, Rape and Abortion, Lauren Kelley; Sarah Seltzer; AlterNet
As the convention pivoted away from social issues, conservative figures couldn't stop saying weird stuff about rape.
Legitimate Rape Is Back
Why Sexual Fundamentalists Dominate Politics and How We Can Stop Them

 

Child abuse in my church

  • Bishop Robert Finn: Resign as Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Kansas City - St. Joseph, MO.
  • Denying communion to those who disagree

Jeff Weis, Change.org

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September 29, 2012 I'm a Catholic and I take my kids to church every Sunday. Church is supposed to be a safe place. But Bishop Robert Finn, who is the head of my diocese (that's a regional group of churches), made our church unsafe for my children when he covered up a child sex abuse scandal.

Last month, Father Shawn Ratigan -- who was a priest in a church near mine -- plead guilty in U.S. Federal Court to producing and possessing child pornography. Father Ratigan used his position as a priest to take lewd images of children in his faith community.

Now a judge has found Bishop Finn guilty of covering up Ratigan's crimes -- Bishop Finn is the highest level leader in the church ever to be convicted in a sex abuse scandal. But despite his conviction, Bishop Finn still has his job as head of our diocese.

I started a petition on Change.org asking Bishop Finn to resign as head of the Kansas City diocese. Click here to add your name.

Since Bishop Finn's conviction, groups like the National Survivor Advocates Coalition have called on him to resign, and the Kansas City Star published an editorial saying it's time for him to go. Our diocese needs a leader who protects children, not one who protects their abusers.

As a Catholic, I believe in forgiveness, and I think Bishop Finn should be forgiven. But as a father, I don't think he should keep a job where he could put more children in danger.  Forgiveness and change can work together.

The Catholic church needs to see that it's not enough to get rid of priests who abuse children -- the leaders who cover up the abuse must be held accountable as well. I know that if thousands of people sign my petition, Bishop Finn will have to resign.

Click here to sign my petition calling on Bishop Robert Finn, who was convicted of covering up a child pornography scandal, to resign as the head of the Kansas City diocese.

Thank you.

Related:

Denying communion to those who disagree, Michael Sherrard, Faithful America

Denying communion to those who disagree

Michael Sherrard, Faithful America

The Archbishop of Newark just sent a pastoral letter, addressed to over 1 million Catholics in his archdiocese, demanding that Catholics who support marriage equality refrain from receiving Holy Communion.

This is a step too far. It's one thing for the bishops to pursue an increasingly conservative political agenda. It's quite another to wield the Blessed Sacrament as a political weapon against anyone who disagrees.

We need a huge public outcry to show Archbishop John Myers that his new position is unacceptable, or we risk other bishops joining him -- and millions of faithful Catholics being denied Holy Communion. Can you sign our emergency petition right now?

Tell Archbishop Myers: Don't use communion as a political weapon.

Thanks!

Source:

"New Jersey Archbishop Urges Same-Sex Marriage Supporters To Refrain From Taking Communion," ThinkProgress, September 26, 2012

Related:

Keep partisan politics out of our pews, James Salt, Catholics United

  • It is past time to require the IRS to enforce the law.  Tax exemptions must be withdrawn from religious institutions that engage in partisan politics.  No wobbling, no ducking.
  • Catholic Hierarchy’s ‘Fortnight For Freedom’ Campaign Is ‘Thoroughly Misguided’
  • Is America on the Verge of Theocracy?
     

Masculinity and Mass Violence


The ‘Intimate Enemy’ We Refuse to Name

Elizabeth Drescher, Religion Dispatches

This article is made possible with the generous contributions of
all reader supported Evergreene Digest readers like you. Thank you!

August 19, 2012 | On July 20, just after James Holmes wounded 58 and killed 12 people at the opening of the latest Batman film at an Aurora, Colorado movie theater, The
Telegraph published a “history of mass shootings in the U.S. since Columbine”—a list of nearly 30 shooting sprees with lethal results. Ne’er-do-wells who merely wounded didn’t make the cut. Thus, not included on the list was a shooting spree in an Alabama bar with a multiple arson warm-up just two days earlier. There, enraged after having been fired from his job (only the latest in a string of personal and financial calamities), Nathan Van Wilkins fired into a bar from across the street, wounding or otherwise injuring 17 people but not killing anyone.


Likewise, the non-fatal, apparently gang-related shootings of four girls in a Chicago park on July 11 was omitted. The shooter or shooters there have not been apprehended, but Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel offered a warning that, as I will discuss shortly, hardly helps matters for those of us who are concerned about what seems to be a growing tide of mass violence. “Take your stuff to the alley,” Emanuel was quoted as saying. “Don’t touch the children of the city of Chicago. Don’t get near them.”

Full story...

Related:

Not Senseless, Not Random: The Deadly Mix of Race, Guns & Madness, Rinku Sen, ColorLines

  • But none of (what we need to do) will be likely unless, in our grief and fear, we also muster up clarity and outrage. Right now - before the public debate is recaptured by questions of which politician said what to whom.
  • 60 Mass Shootings Since Tucson
  • Sikh temple shooting sheds light on world of 'hate rock’
  • Batman Shooter and His Psyche Drugs
     

Are Muslims Nuts?

  • Probably as many Middle Easterners wonder, ‘why do they hate us?’ as we have wondered of them.
  • Catholic Church '200 years behind,' Cardinal says before death

Haroon Moghul, Religion Dispatches

People don't invent these narratives on their own.

September 19, 2012 | The last time I visited Pakistan was in 2007, soon after I’d started my Ph.D. My topic was Muhammad Iqbal, the philosopher and poet who gave intellectual heft to the Pakistan movement. Not surprisingly, my family was intrigued by my choice of topic. They were however less amused by my choice of residence: I lived at the edge of Columbia campus, near Harlem, an arrangement that elicited respectful horror.


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“Isn’t New York so dangerous?” they asked. (A Pakistani was asking me if my city was dangerous?) In their minds, New Yorkers had only to exit their apartments and they would immediately be subjected to random muggings, extortionate kidnappings, spectacularly explosive car chases, or Allah knows what else. Probably their idea of the city had been formed by and remained stuck in Coming to America.

Full story...

Related:

Catholic Church '200 years behind,' Cardinal says before death, Livia Borghese, for CNN

  • Martini was known for his progressive position on some of the Church's most controversial issues, including priestly celibacy, the use of condoms, euthanasia and homosexuality.
  • First bishop found guilty in sex abuse crisis
  • Franciscan friars back American nuns in Vatican spat
     

The Great Shopping Cart War

 

  • It seems so unlikely that the simple shopping cart would provoke major controversy.
  • Mitt Romney on "Freeloaders," Mideast, and Why He's Scared of the Women on 'the View"

Jeff Dietrich, Catholic Agitator

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I am a homeless enabler. The Los Angeles Catholic Worker has been publicly accused by police and business community of being homeless enablers because we provide food—more than 5,000 meals weekly. We provide blankets, raincoats and heavy blue tarps for shelter.
   
We are homeless enablers, and we are proud to provide the essentials that enable the homeless to stay alive.

However, the most reprehensible thing we have done is to give the homeless free shopping carts in which to store their belongings. Over the past 12 years, we have provided more than 25,000 carts that, unlike those from grocery stores, cannot
legally be confiscated by the police because the L.A. Catholic Worker
owns them.

Full story...

Related:

Mitt Romney on "Freeloaders," Mideast, and Why He's Scared of the Women on 'the View" AlterNet

  • Candidate expresses belief that there's not much he can do about peace in the Middle East, so as POTUS he'll hope to pass it on to the next guy.
  • Full Secret Video Released
  • 8 Falsehoods, Lies and Misstatements From Romney Fundraising Video
  • Romney Says Typical Middle-Class Homes Earn $250,000 A Year
  • Romney's 47%: What Other Rights Would The GOP Deny Them?
     

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