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Churchgoers, save yourselves

  • Your influence is waning, but this election, you're doubling down.
  • Child abuse in my church

Eric Stuberg, Minneapolis (MN) Star Tribune

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November 1, 2012 | I know the church well. My father is a minister; my grandparents were gospel singers until they were too old to sing. I was a poster child for our denomination at a young age, preaching by the time I was 16. It is this past and my love for my family that makes me worry about the future freedoms of the Christian church.

I have a fearful respect for the power of religion, and for the power of a well-spoken message to people who honestly want to please God. I will spare you personal details of my sick feeling when I realized how terribly wrong I had been, as if I had been given the cure for cancer only to find that the active ingredient was long taken out and replaced with a disgusting version of self-righteousness.

Full story...

Related:

Child abuse in my church, Jeff Weis, Change.org

  • Bishop Robert Finn: Resign as Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Kansas City - St. Joseph, MO.
  • Denying communion to those who disagree
     

Americans United Says Taxpayers Have Right To Challenge Church Control Of Federal Program

  • Watchdog Group Tells Court That Public Has Right To Question Bishops’ Restrictions On Program To Help Sex-Trafficking Victims
  • Keep partisan politics out of our pews

Americans United

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Lydia Howell

This article is made possible with the generous contributions of all reader supported Evergreene Digest readers like you. Thank you!

October 24, 2012 | When the federal government lets a church group impose religious doctrine on a publicly funded program, taxpayers have the right to take the matter to court.

That’s the viewpoint put forward by Americans United for Separation of Church and State in a friend-of-the-court brief filed with the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals today.

Full story...

Related:

Keep partisan politics out of our pews, James Salt, Catholics United

  • It is past time to require the IRS to enforce the law.  Tax exemptions must be withdrawn from religious institutions that engage in partisan politics.  No wobbling, no ducking.
  • Catholic Hierarchy’s ‘Fortnight For Freedom’ Campaign Is ‘Thoroughly Misguided’
  • Is America on the Verge of Theocracy?
     

Vatican II: Gone but not forgotten

  • Five decades after sweeping reforms were proposed to update the Catholic faith, the church stands at a crossroads.
  • Vatican II, 50 Years On: The Sunlight That Shines Today
  • Nuns, Faith & Politics

John Gehring, Special to Los Angeles (CA) Times / Minneapolis (MN) Sttar Tribune

This article is made possible with the generous contributions of
all reader supported Evergreene Digest readers like you. Thank you!

Sister Simone Campbell, left, leads a "Nuns on the bus" tour. Photo: J. Scott Applewhite, Associated Press

October 16, 2012 Fifty years ago this month, the Catholic Church embarked on a period of soul-searching that reverberated far beyond St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. Pope John XXIII called Catholic bishops across the globe to the Second Vatican Council,  opening the windows of a monarchical church to the modern world.

The first Catholic president, John F. Kennedy, sat in the White House. Clergy infused the civil rights movement with moral transcendence. These were heady days for religious progressives.

Full story...

Vatican II, 50 Years On: The Sunlight That Shines Today, Charles P. Pierce, Esquire

  • And Good Pope John did it smiling. This would be a joyful revolution and nothing would ever be the same again.
  • Catholic Church '200 years behind,' Cardinal says before death

Nuns, Faith & Politics, Moyers & Company <http://billmoyers.com>

  • On a road trip of faith and politics, American nuns spread the word: Paul Ryan’s budget would hurt those already struggling to make ends meet.
  • Don’t Mess With the Nuns
     

Vatican II, 50 Years On: The Sunlight That Shines Today

  • And Good Pope John did it smiling. This would be a joyful revolution and nothing would ever be the same again.
  • Catholic Church '200 years behind,' Cardinal says before death

Charles P. Pierce, Esquire

Good Pope John entering Saint Peter's for the opening ceremonies of the Second Vatican Council on October 11, 1962. "It meant being out in the world," Sister Simone tells The Politics Blog, "encountering life there." AP Photo

October 11, 2012 | Fifty years ago today, in Vatican City, a couple of guys shoved open a pair of larger bronze doors. The pope gave a speech. This is part of what he said:

"In the daily exercise of our pastoral office, we sometimes have to listen, much to our regret, to voices of persons who, though burning with zeal, are not endowed with too much sense of discretion or measure. In these modern times they can see nothing but prevarication and ruin. They say that our era, in comparison with past eras, is getting worse, and they behave as though they had learned nothing from history, which is, none the less, the teacher of life. They behave as though at the time of former Councils everything was a full triumph for the Christian idea and life and for proper religious liberty. We feel we must disagree with those prophets of gloom, who are always forecasting disaster, as though the end of the world were at hand."

Read more:

Related:

Catholic Church '200 years behind,' Cardinal says before death, Livia Borghese, for CNN

  • Martini was known for his progressive position on some of the Church's most controversial issues, including priestly celibacy, the use of condoms, euthanasia and homosexuality.
  • First bishop found guilty in sex abuse crisis
  • Franciscan friars back American nuns in Vatican spat
     

A matter of faith


Unfortunately, the misperception persists that people of faith - and Christians, in particular - are largely in favor of the marriage amendment. It is simply not that case!

Pastor Grant Stevensen, Minnesotans United for All Families

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In less than four weeks, we'll go to the polls - and Minnesotans will decide if we want to limit a basic freedom and tell some families that they are better than others. That's what the marriage amendment forces us to do.

For thousands of Minnesotans, defeating this amendment is a matter of faith. Unfortunately, the misperception persists that people of faith - and Christians, in particular - are largely in favor of this amendment. It is simply not that case!

Lutherans, Methodists, Episcopalians, Catholics, Presbyterians, the United Church of Christ, Baptists, Quakers, Buddhists, Unitarians, and the Jewish community have taken strong stands against this amendment and are having important conversations in their faith communities daily about defeating this hurtful attempt to limit individual and religious freedom in our state.

Together, we can do this - but it's going to take all of us. Click here to watch our conversation training video and get started right away!

Don't be afraid to talk about your faith when conversing about the marriage amendment. For many of us, our faith is core to why we oppose this amendment - and Minnesotans overwhelmingly believe in treating others as we would like to be treated.

If you are a person of faith, we must explain to people that it is because of our religious beliefs - not in spite of them - that we are voting no. God is love.

And if you are not a person of faith, the language of love, promise and inclusion are universal truths that resonate with Minnesotans regardless of religious beliefs.

If you're like me, you might find these conversations difficult. Sometimes, they are - but they are too important not to have. For the next 27 days, we need to reach out, swallow our frustration, and talk to everyone we can about why this amendment is wrong for our families, our children, our religious communities and our future.

Sign up to watch our online conversation training video - get started today! Time is running out to make sure we defeat this amendment.

United in faith,
Pastor Grant Stevensen
Faith Director
Minnesotans United for All Families

Saving Christ from the Self-Proclaimed Christians of the Corporate Church


Dare we go deeper while letting go of preachers, politicians and corporate heads?

Burl Hall, opednews.com

October 9, 2012 | "What hinders men from seeing and hearing God, is their own hearing, seeing and willing; by their own wills they separate themselves from the will of God. They see and hear within their own desires, which obstructs them from seeing and hearing God. Terrestrial and material things overshadow them, and they cannot see beyond their own human nature. If they would be still, desist from thinking and feeling with their own self-hood, subdue the self-will, enter into a state of resignation, into a divine union with Christ, who sees God, and hears God, and speaks with him, who knows the word and will of God; then would the eternal hearing seeing and speaking become revealed to them." ~ Jacob Boehme (1575-1624 C.E.)

The primary purpose of all meditation is to attain clarity of mind and union with one's Beloved. This attainment of Absolute Mind is called Bliss, Nirvana, Orgasmic Release, etc. To experience this means one needs to subdue the clattering, chattering conditioned mind of Ego and surrender to the profound silence inherent in the Greater Mind. This Mind is beyond the Bible thumping preacher. Often, the preacher does not act as a catalyst to salvation; indeed, through his theology-philosophy he oftentimes hinders it and keeps us stuck in ego--his ego and our own.

Full story...

Archbishop Nienstedt Responds to A Catholic Gay Mother's Concerns

  • "I urge you to reconsider the position you expressed in your letter. Your eternal salvation may well depend upon a conversion of heart on this topic."
  • Child abuse in my church

Truth Wins Out
 
Thanks to Evergreene Digest reader Cynthia Orange for this contribution

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Related:

Child abuse in my church, Jeff Weis, Change.org

  • Bishop Robert Finn: Resign as Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Kansas City - St. Joseph, MO.
  • Denying communion to those who disagree
     

Charlie Fuqua, Arkansas Legislative Candidate, Endorses Death Penalty For Rebellious Children

  • "I think my views are fairly well-accepted by most people," Fuqua said to AP.
  • 5 Crazy Things the GOP Is Still Saying About Women, Rape and Abortion

John Celock, Huffington Post

This article is made possible with the generous contributions of
all reader supported Evergreene Digest readers like you. Thank you!

October 7, 2012 | Charlie Fuqua, the Republican candidate for the Arkansas House of Representatives who called for expelling Muslims from the United States in his book, also wrote in support for instituting the death penalty for "rebellious children."

In "God's Law," Fuqua's 2012 book, the candidate wrote that while parents love their children, a process could be set up to allow for the institution of the death penalty for "rebellious children," according to the Arkansas Times. Fuqua, who is anti-abortion, points out that the course of action involved in sentencing a child to death is described in the Bible and would involve judicial approval. While it is unlikely that many parents would seek to have their children killed by the government, Fuqua wrote, such power would serve as a way to stop rebellious children.

Full story...

Related:

5 Crazy Things the GOP Is Still Saying About Women, Rape and Abortion, Lauren Kelley; Sarah Seltzer; AlterNet
As the convention pivoted away from social issues, conservative figures couldn't stop saying weird stuff about rape.
Legitimate Rape Is Back
Why Sexual Fundamentalists Dominate Politics and How We Can Stop Them

 

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