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Citizens must be better educated about U.S. economic options

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  • U.S. political culture and our education system have roles to play in the dire straits of our economy.
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  • Some ideas for building a better, more informed national consensus.
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  • Austerity - a sure path to a bad economy
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Alex Alben, Seattle Times | WA

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Why can't we have a serious debate in America about our national economy, instead of the current situation in which both political parties engage in coded talking points in lieu of meaningful discussion? Both our political culture and educational system are to blame, but the national media landscape is also part of the problem.

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To influence good policy choices, informed citizens should know this data:
• Size of the U.S. economy — $14.62 trillion gross domestic product (2010 estimate);
• Total U.S. national debt — $13.56 trillion;
• 2010 federal budget — $3.5 trillion;
• U.S. deficit for 2010 — $1.378 trillion (projected).

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More...

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Related:

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Austerity - a sure path to a bad economy, David Blanchflower, Bloomberg News/Minneapolis Star Tribune | MN

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  • You want evidence? Take a look at what's happening in Britain now.
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  • Lesson From Europe: Fiscal Austerity Kills Economies
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  • Media Unwittingly Plays Republicans' Deficit Game
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