You are here

Bases, Bases, Everywhere … Except in the Pentagon’s Report

https://consortiumnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/An-aerial-view-of-the-Pentagon-in-Washington-District-of-Columbia-DC-as-a-9_11-Memorial-Service-is-conducted-on-the-Southwest-corner-the-area-of-the-building-damaged-during-the-9_11-attack-700x445.jpg

  • These installations exist somewhere between light and shadow, writes Nick Turse. While acknowledged as foreign military outposts, they are excluded from the official inventory. 
  • “U.S. bases abroad cost upwards of $50 billion per year to build and maintain, which is money that could be used to address pressing needs at home in education, health care, housing, and infrastructure.”

Nick Turse,  TomDispatchConsortium News / Rise Up Times

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/David%20Vine%20%7C%20Base%20Nation%20jaCKET%20ILLUS.jpgJanuary 16, 2019 | Within hours of President Trump’s announcement of a withdrawal of U.S. forces from Syria, equipment at that base was already being inventoried for removal. And just like that, arguably the most important American garrison in Syria was (maybe) being struck from the Pentagon’s books — except, as it happens, al-Tanf was never actually on the Pentagon’s books. Opened in 2015 and, until recently, home to hundreds of U.S. troops, it was one of the many military bases that exist somewhere between light and shadow, an acknowledged foreign outpost that somehow never actually made it onto the Pentagon’s official inventory of bases.

Officially, the Department of Defense maintains 4,775 “sites,” spread across all 50 states, eight U.S. territories, and 45 foreign countries. A total of 514 of these outposts are located overseas, according to the Pentagon’s worldwide property portfolio. Just to start down a long list, these include bases on the Indian Ocean island of Diego Garcia, in Djibouti on the Horn of Africa, as well as in Peru and Portugal, the United Arab Emirates, and the United Kingdom. But the most recent version of that portfolio, issued in early 2018 and known as the Base Structure Report (BSR), doesn’t include any mention of al-Tanf. Or, for that matter, any other base in Syria. Or Iraq. Or Afghanistan. Or Niger. Or Tunisia. Or Cameroon. Or Somalia. Or any number of locales where such military outposts are known to exist and even, unlike in Syria, to be expanding.

https://consortiumnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Nick-Turse-1-100x100.jpg / Nick Turse <>is the managing editor of TomDispatch and a contributing writer for the Intercept. His latest book is “Next Time They’ll Come to Count the Dead: War and Survival in South Sudan.” His website is NickTurse.com.


Full story …

Related:

Was Ending the Draft a Grave Mistake? Danny Sjursen, Truthdig

https://www.truthdig.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/5416274148_c424e0bcce_z.jpgSwitching from all-volunteer to mandatory military service could force Americans to reconsider their ever-expanding empire.
 

 

 


http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Editor%20Comment%20icon_0.jpgIf you find truth in these postings, please forward them to everyone else you know.