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Because Passover is a refugee story, one synagogue invited refugees to Seder.

Photo via iStock.

  • This year, Beth-El is preparing to host over 100 congregants and some special first-time guests: about 50 refugees, most from Afghanistan.
  • "There’s a saying in Judaism that a little light dispels a lot of darkness," Rabbi Michael Knopf says. "So even though we’re just one little community in one little city, I think we’re doing a lot of illuminating for at least this group of people."

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April 7, 2017 | Rabbi Michael Knopf of Temple Beth-El in Richmond, Virginia, is marveling at the length of his to-do list for Tuesday's Passover Seder.

The food still has to be cooked, the Haggadahs proofread, and volunteers wrangled.

"[It's] a little bit crazy, but in a good way," Knopf says.

Eric March: Just your average red-blooded, all-American transit geek and musical theater fanatic. If you want to chat about dedicated bus rapid transit lanes or why "Sixteen Going on Seventeen" is actually a comedy song and not a ballad, join me on Facebook or Twitter.

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