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The Forgotten History of Cinco De Mayo

https://prod01-cdn05.cdn.firstlook.org/wp-uploads/sites/1/2017/05/cinco-de-mayo-1494014874-article-header.jpg

This image depicts the Battle of Puebla between Mexican forces and invading French forces that took place on May 5, 1862.

It's not about beer. It's about rich countries strangling poor ones. 

Jon Schwarz, the Intercept

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May 5 2017 | Today is Cinco De Mayo, May 5. To the degree most Americans think about it all, it’s as a day to drink lots of Mexican beer.

But the forgotten history behind Cinco de Mayo is fascinating and remains extremely relevant today. In fact, it’s so relevant for small countries around the world that it’s hard not to believe that’s exactly why it’s been forgotten.

Cinco de Mayo celebrates the victory of Mexican troops over the invading 

French army at the Battle of Puebla southeast of Mexico City on May 5, 1862. Because the Mexican soldiers were badly outnumbered and outgunned, the unexpected triumph was a watershed in forging the country’s national identity. (Militarily it wasn’t that significant — the next year France captured the Mexican capital and installed a member of the Austrian nobility as Maximillian I, “Emperor of Mexico.”)

https://prod01-cdn04.cdn.firstlook.org/wp-uploads/sites/1/2015/04/Jon-Schwarz_avatar_1429549467-350x350.jpgBefore joining First Look, Jon Schwarz worked for Michael Moore’s Dog Eat Dog Films and was Research Producer for Moore’s Capitalism: A Love Story. He’s contributed to many publications, including The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal, Mother Jones and Slate, as well as NPR and “Saturday Night Live.”

Full story …