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House Republicans to Troops: Pay for Your Own Damn GI Bill

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  • That is the hypocrisy of the Republican ethos. They will wave the flag and trumpet patriotism, but when they see the faces of the people who make up the force that protects them and provides their freedom, what they want to say is, “Thank you for your service ... but not really.”
  • 1 in 4 vets of Iraq, Afghanistan wars visiting Minneapolis VA need food help, study finds.

Michael Harriot, The Root

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Wednesday, April 19, 2017 | Just like when Republicans talk about “family values” and then you find out they’ve been having secret sex meet-ups in airport bathrooms or abusing teenage boys, when conservatives say they “support the troops,” they usually mean they’re sending them overseas to fight for oil profits, but now it also means they’re taxing them for their own benefits.

According to the Military Times, House Veterans Affairs Committee Chairman Phil Roe (R-Tenn.) has drafted legislation that would charge soldiers $100 a month for access to the GI Bill. The bill would deduct a total of $2,400 from each soldier’s paycheck to make them eligible. To be clear, this money would not be used to offset spending, because it would only be a fraction of the total cost. Supporters of the proposal (pronounced “as soles”) say that having soldiers “buy in” would make future budget-makers less likely to cut veterans benefits, which is a lie.

Michael Harriot is a staff writer at The Root, host of "The Black One" podcast and editor-in-chief of the daily digital magazine NegusWhoRead.

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Related:

1 in 4 vets of Iraq, Afghanistan wars visiting Minneapolis VA need food help, study finds, Susan Perry, MinnPost 

Study author Rachel Widome: “The estimates for the costs of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq range between $4 and $6 trillion. They went on for over a decade. I just think it’s unconscionable that such a sizeable proportion of our military that we sent to fight these wars are struggling to afford food.”

 

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