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Series | War and the State: Part 1, War And The Health Of The State: What Causes War

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  • Strange bedfellows indeed, war and welfare. Yet they seem to have gotten on quite well. It would never occur to us that we owe our welfare benefits to the killing of innocents abroad. Yet that seems to be the case. State does what is expedient when it comes to serving its ultimate cause: war. It cannot be otherwise.
  • First installment of a six part analysis
  • Related: An American Century of Carnage: Measuring Violence in a Single Superpower World

Arthur D. Robbins, Dandelion Salad

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March 24, 2017 | War has indeed become perpetual and peace no longer even a fleeting wish nor a distant memory. We have become habituated to the rumblings of war and the steady drum beat of propaganda about war’s necessity and the noble motives that inspire it. We will close hospitals. We will close schools. We will close libraries and museums. We will sell off our park lands and water supply. [1] People will sleep on the streets and go hungry. The war machine will go on.

What are we to do?

Arthur D. Robbins, Writer, Dandelion Salad

Full story … 

Related: 

An American Century of Carnage: Measuring Violence in a Single Superpower World, John W. Dower,  TomDispatchTruthout / Rise Up Times

https://i0.wp.com/www.truth-out.org/images/Images_2017_03/2017_0328td_.jpg The United States has demonstrated an almost religious devotion to the task of developing and deploying ever more sophisticated weapons of mass destruction. (Photo: Senior Airman Tyler Woodward / US Air Force)

Here, then, is a trend line intimately connected to global violence that is not heading downward. In 1996, the UN’s estimate was that there were 37.3 million forcibly displaced individuals on the planet. Twenty years later, as 2015 ended, this had risen to 65.3 million — a 75% increase over the last two post-Cold War decades that the declinist literature refers to as the “new peace.”

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