You are here

Sold for Parts: Can Low-Wage Industries Survive Without Immigrants and Refugees?

Section(s): 

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Immigration%20Banner.jpg

  • Part 1: Sold for Parts
    • One of the most dangerous companies in the U.S. took advantage of immigrant workers. Then, when they got hurt or fought back, it used America’s laws against them.
  • Part 2: Can Low-Wage Industries Survive Without Immigrants and Refugees?
    • Case Farms’ history shows how many sectors like meatpacking depend on immigrants and refugees. Now business leaders fear President Trump’s policies will create a labor shortage.

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

http://globalassets.starbucks.com/assets/20229527c1c240439ddbc81bf821d95e.jpg Click here to become a monthly sustaining member of all reader-supported Evergreene Digest.

 

 



Part 1: Sold for Parts

One of the most dangerous companies in the U.S. took advantage of immigrant workers. Then, when they got hurt or fought back, it used America’s laws against them.

Michael Grabell, ProPublica

https://static.propublica.org/projects/case-farms/assets/images/generated/story-opener-A-8x10-1200*960-9a4cdc.jpgMay 1, 2017 | By late afternoon, the smell from the Case Farms chicken plant in Canton, Ohio, is like a pungent fog, drifting over a highway lined with dollar stores and auto parts shops. When the stink is at its ripest, it means that the day’s 180,000 chickens have been slaughtered, drained of blood, stripped of feathers and carved into pieces — and it’s time for workers like Osiel López Pérez to clean up. On April 7, 2015, Osiel put on bulky rubber boots and a white hard hat, and trained a pressurized hose on the plant’s stainless steel machines, blasting off the leftover grease, meat and blood.

A Guatemalan immigrant, Osiel was just weeks past his 17th birthday, too young by law to work in a factory. A year earlier, after gang members shot his mother and tried to kidnap his sisters, he left his home, in the mountainous village of Tectitán, and sought asylum in the United States. He got the job at Case Farms with a driver’s license that said his name was Francisco Sepulveda, age 28. The photograph on the ID was of his older brother, who looked nothing like him, but nobody asked any questions.

https://static.propublica.org/projects/case-farms/assets/images/michael-grabell-200x200.jpg Michael Grabell covers economic issues, labor, immigration and trade. He has reported on the ground from more than 30 states, as well as some of the remotest villages in Alaska and Guatemala. His work has appeared in The New Yorker and The New York Times and on Vice and NPR. He has won a Gerald Loeb Award for business journalism and an IRE Medal for investigative reporting and is a three-time finalist for the Livingston Award for Young Journalists.

Full story … 



Part 2: Can Low-Wage Industries Survive Without Immigrants and Refugees?

Case Farms’ history shows how many sectors like meatpacking depend on immigrants and refugees. Now business leaders fear President Trump’s policies will create a labor shortage.

Michael Grabell, ProPublica 

https://static.propublica.org/projects/case-farms/assets/images/generated/case-farms-spot-illo-02-900*549-3952a8.pngMay 5, 2017 | One afternoon this fall, I knocked on the door of a redbrick apartment building in Akron, Ohio, looking for a Bhutanese refugee who’d lost the tips of his fingers at a Case Farms chicken plant in a vacuum-pressure machine known as a “fat sucker.”

In the apartment’s tiny living room, a young man told his story in halting English. As he spoke, I realized that his name was different from the one I had, and, instead of losing his fingertips in a fat sucker at the company’s Canton plant, he’d lost his pinkie to a saw at its plant in nearby Winesburg. I had the wrong guy, but I’d stumbled on yet another Bhutanese refugee who’d sacrificed part of his body for the company.

https://static.propublica.org/projects/case-farms/assets/images/michael-grabell-200x200.jpg Michael Grabell covers economic issues, labor, immigration and trade. He has reported on the ground from more than 30 states, as well as some of the remotest villages in Alaska and Guatemala. His work has appeared in The New Yorker and The New York Times and on Vice and NPR. He has won a Gerald Loeb Award for business journalism and an IRE Medal for investigative reporting and is a three-time finalist for the Livingston Award for Young Journalists.

Full story … 

http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PlsShareArrow5.png