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Special Report | Ignoring What We Still Haven't Learned from the Vietnam War

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US Troops in Firefight in Viet Nam

  • Part 1: What We Still Haven't Learned from the Vietnam War
  • What happened to the citizens, community leaders, institutions, and politicians that we would allow this endless warfare to continue?
  • Part 2: Ken Burns’ powerful anti-war film on Vietnam ignores the power of the anti-war movement
  • The Vietnam peace movement provides an inspiring example of the power of ordinary citizens willing to stand up to the world’s most powerful government in a time of war. Its story deserves to be told fairly and fully.

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 



Part 1: What We Still Haven't Learned from the Vietnam War

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Pentagon%20Protest%20Oct%2021%2C%2067.jpgPentagon Protest Oct 21, 67 Vietnam War protesters march at the Pentagon in Washington, DC on October 21, 1967. Photo credit: Frank Wolfe / LBJ Library / Wikimedia

What happened to the citizens, community leaders, institutions, and politicians that we would allow this endless warfare to continue? And where is the anti-war movement? Why are they MIA?

Jimmy Falls, WhoWhatWhy

October 21, 2017 | Fifty years ago today, in 1967, nearly 100,000 Americans marched on Washington, DC, to protest the Vietnam War. In those days there was a mandatory draft in place, and the risk was very real that a young man just out of high school could quickly wind up 13,000 miles away, fighting an unseen enemy in jungles that didn’t need tanks or B-52 bombers to inflict fear. Worse yet was the possibility of going MIA or coming home in a body bag — just another expendable statistic in the great fight against communism. But even many of those who made it back left part of their souls in that war zone.

Today there is no longer a mandatory draft. And neither is there any anti-war movement to speak of.

Jimmy Falls: Author at WhoWhatWhy.

Full story … 



Part 2: Ken Burns’ powerful anti-war film on Vietnam ignores the power of the anti-war movement

 

The Vietnam peace movement provides an inspiring example of the power of ordinary citizens willing to stand up to the world’s most powerful government in a time of war. Its story deserves to be told fairly and fully.

Robert Levering, Waging Non-violence

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Vietnam%20Ant-War%20Protest.jpgOctober 17, 2017 | Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s PBS series, “The Vietnam War,” deserves an Oscar for its depiction of the gore of war and the criminality of the warmakers. But it also deserves to be critiqued for its portrayal of the anti-war movement.

Millions of us joined the struggle against the war. I worked for years as an organizer for major national demonstrations and many smaller ones. Any semblance between the peace movement I experienced and the one depicted by the Burns/Novick series is purely coincidental.

Robert Levering worked as full-time anti-Vietnam war organizer with such groups as AFSC and the New Mobilization Committee and Peoples Coalition for Peace and Justice. He is currently working on a book entitled "Resistance and the Vietnam War: The Nonviolent Movement that Crippled the Draft, Thwarted the War Effort While Helping Topple Two Presidents" to be published in 2018. He is also working with a team of fellow draft resisters on a documentary to be released in 2018 entitled "The Boys Who Said NO! Draft Resistance and the Vietnam War."

Full story … 

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