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The U.S. and Saudi Arabia Have Been Getting Away With Murder for Years

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U.S. President Donald Trump (R) meets with Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the Oval Office of the White House on March 20, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Saudi Arabia’s alleged killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi has forced the kingdom’s brutality into the media spotlight. Meanwhile, the war on Yemen has taken a back seat.

Roqayah Chamseddine, In These Times

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20 October 2018 | March 2015 marked a decisive phase in what is now a morethan three-year war in Yemen. Saudi Arabia, in coordination with members of the Gulf Cooperation Council, initiated a military operation against Yemen’s capital of Sana’a in an effort to dislodge any fragment of Houthi presence while also fomenting a tide of psychological warfare that would signal the ruthless course of action to come. Yemen’s infrastructure was so thoroughly upended by coalition attacks that within a year and a half of the initial salvo, the local population was struck by the worst cholera outbreak ever recorded in modern history. Today, with an aerial and naval blockade choking off aid supplies, the number of Yemenis who are entirely dependent on humanitarian assistance is over 22 million. The catastrophic impact on mental health in Yemen has resulted in psychological trauma, including a surge in suicide rates. Despite worldwide condemnation, U.S.-backed coalition airstrikes have continued—targeting hospitals, medical facilities, religious sites, and even gatherings of mourners.

While the media landscape is saturated with concern for the whereabouts and likely demise of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, whose reported disappearance has thrown the Kingdom’s advocacy campaign into overdrive, concern for Saudi Arabia's military offensive in Yemen has taken a backseat. Still, the bloodshed in Yemen has not abated for a moment, with American weapons lighting the way.

Roqayah Chamseddine <> is a writer, researcher, and host of the Delete Your Account podcast. Her work has appeared in The Sydney Morning Herald, ELLE Magazine, Splinter, Overland Journal, among others.

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