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What Movies Get Right (and Wrong) About Our Current American Moment

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  • Part 1: Television's best (and worst) attempts to capture our current American moment
    • By far the strongest shows to take on America's current moment are … science fiction and fantasy.
  • Part 2: What The Post Gets Right (and Wrong) About Katharine Graham and the Pentagon Papers
    • A Smithsonian historian reminds us how Graham, a Washington socialite-turned-publisher, transformed the paper into what it is today.
  • Related: Audiences Want Diversity In Hollywood. Hollywood’s Been Slow To Get The Message.

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

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Part 1: Television's best (and worst) attempts to capture our current American moment

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Scene%20from%20%2522The%20Good%20Place%2522.jpg"The Good Place." Colleen Hayes/NBC | 2017 NBCUniversal Media, LLC

By far the strongest shows to take on America's current moment are not cable dramas, political barnburners or family sitcoms, but science fiction and fantasy.

Jim McDermott, America 

February 16, 2018 | Given the moment we are in, you might think a lot of shows on television would be trying to talk about current events or “America” in some way. But in point of fact, there aren’t that many. And even fewer are doing it well.

The most recent to enter the ring is “Here and Now,” HBO’s new show about a late-middle-aged liberal couple in crisis and their four semi-adult children, one of whom is haunted by the numbers “11:11.” (No, really.)

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Jim%20McDermott%2C%20America.jpgJim McDermott is America’s <> Los Angeles correspondent.

Full Story … 



Part 2: What The Post Gets Right (and Wrong) About Katharine Graham and the Pentagon Papers

https://thumbs-prod.si-cdn.com/5SgQFxARUs7_4n9VeqaQnrktBZs=/800x600/filters:no_upscale()/https://public-media.smithsonianmag.com/filer/55/33/553396c3-3b1d-4d9d-a664-bd59e18009c5/thepost-web.jpgMeryl Streep and Tom Hanks in “The Post.” (20th Century Fox)

A Smithsonian historian reminds us how Graham, a Washington socialite-turned-publisher, transformed the paper into what it is today.

Anna Diamond, Smithsonian

https://riseuptimes.files.wordpress.com/2014/04/journalism.jpg?w=240 December 29, 2017 | The decision to publish the famed Pentagon Papers in The Washington Post ultimately came before its publisher, Katharine Graham. Caught between the caution of her lawyers and the zeal of her hardworking journalists, Graham was under enormous pressure. The estimable New York Times first broke the story about a cache of classified government documents revealing uncomfortable truths about the Vietnam War, but after the Nixon Administration successfully stopped the Times from printing, Graham’s paper had a golden opportunity to pick up the story.

On one side were her Post reporters and editors, eager to play catch-up while they had the advantage on the Times. On the other, were the lawyers arguing against publishing the study, warning that the court might order an injunction against them as well. The newspaper board’s advisors feared that it would lead the paper, which recently went public, into financial turmoil.

Anna Diamond is the editorial assistant for Smithsonian magazine.

Full story … 

Related:

Audiences Want Diversity In Hollywood. Hollywood’s Been Slow To Get The Message. Marina Fang, Huff Post

  • http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Hollywood%20sign.jpgMovie and TV executives continue to treat successful projects with diverse casts and creators, like “Black Panther,” as the exception rather than the rule.
  • Related: Why aren’t Hollywood films more diverse?