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What We Need to Understand to Reform Corporate America

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  • It is time to step outside of the establishment. This means organizing groups, including political parties, that are independent of the corporate political machines that control the Republicans and Democrats.
  • It means carrying out acts of sustained civil disobedience. It means disruption.
  • An investment-banker-turned-law-professor and corporate transparency advocate shares his thoughts on what has to happen during the next four years.
  • Related: What Punch Pizza learned from raising its wages 
  • Part 1: Part 1: We Must Understand Corporate Power to Fight It
  • Part 2: What Voters Need to Know About Reforming Corporate America

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest



Part 1: We Must Understand Corporate Power to Fight It

  • It is time to step outside of the establishment. This means organizing groups, including political parties, that are independent of the corporate political machines that control the Republicans and Democrats.
  • It means carrying out acts of sustained civil disobedience. It means disruption.

Chris Hedges, Truthdig / OpEdNews

6/12/2016 | In the winter of 1941, a Jewish gravedigger from Chelmo, the western province of Poland, appeared in Warsaw and desperately sought a meeting with Jewish leaders.

He told them the Nazis were rounding up Jews, including the old, women and children, and forcing them into what looked like tightly sealed buses. The buses had the exhaust pipes redirected into the cabins. The Jews were killed with carbon monoxide. He had helped dig the mass graves for thousands of corpses until he escaped.

Chris Hedges, a weekly columnist for Truthdig, is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who has reported from more than 50 countries, specializing in American politics and society. 

Full story … 



Part 2: What Voters Need to Know About Reforming Corporate America

  • An investment-banker-turned-law-professor and corporate transparency advocate shares his thoughts on what has to happen during the next four years.
  • Related: What Punch Pizza learned from raising its wages 

Kathy Kiely, Moyers & Company 

http://dy00k1db5oznd.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/GettyImages-186338245-1280x720.jpgColumbia Law School professor Robert Jackson Jr. listens at a 2013 briefing on Capitol Hill as Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) urged the SEC to approve his proposed rule requiring corporations to disclose their political donations. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Robert J. Jackson Jr. is something of a double agent.

On one hand, with his multiple Ivy League degrees, stints at Oxford, the US Treasury, the now-defunct investment bank Bear Stearns and the blue-chip corporate law firm Wachtell Lipton, it would be hard to find a more perfectly pedigreed member of the nation’s financial elite.

But there is another part Jackson’s curriculum vitae. It’s the part that makes him apologize, more than once in the course of an hour-long conversation, for his “cushy job” as a professor at Columbia University’s law school, where he heads the program on corporate law and policy.

Kathy Kiely, a Washington, DC-based journalist and teacher, has reported and edited national politics for a number of news organizations, including USA TODAY, National Journal, The New York Daily News and The Houston Post. She been involved in the coverage of every presidential campaign since 1980.

Full story … 

Related:

What Punch Pizza learned from raising its wages, Ibrahim Hirsi, MinnPost

  • For Punch co-owners Soranno and John Puckett, however, the decision to raise pay wasn't political. It was simply a strategy to attract and retain quality workers who would, in turn, create a better experience for customers.
  • Related: Reframing the Minimum-Wage Debate

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