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Why the Minimum Wage Should Really Be Raised to $15 an Hour

  • Here are seven reasons why we should be raising the federal minimum to $15 an hour.
  • Series | Minimum Wage: Part 1, How taxpayers subsidize low-wage workers

Robert Reich, TruthDig

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March 17, 2013 | “Raising the minimum wage from the current rate of $7.25 an hour to $9 should be a no-brainer,” Robert Reich says. The labor secretary during the Clinton administration argues, among other points, that putting more money in the pockets of the country’s lowest earners is not only fair, it would also help boost the economy.

“Fifteen million workers would get a pay raise, allowing them to buy more and thereby keeping others working,” he says.

Watch here as Reich explains, in 2 minutes and 35 seconds, why he believes it’s time to raise the minimum wage.

Robert Reich is an American political economist, professor, author, and political commentator. He's the Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley and Senior Fellow at the Blum Center for Developing Economies. He was Secretary of Labor in the Clinton administration. Time Magazine named him one of the ten most effective cabinet secretaries of the twentieth century.

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Money%20Pie.jpg Series | Minimum Wage: Part 1, How taxpayers subsidize low-wage workers, Steven Dornfeld, MinnPost

  • Nan Madden, director of the Minnesota Budget Project, a liberal-leaning research and advocacy group, says raising the hourly minimum to $9.50 would reduce reliance on public assistance and promote greater self-reliance.
  • Conservatives Oppose Minimum Wage Increase. Wow. Really?
  • Truth to Tell | Minimum Wage in Minnesota
  • Special Project | The Big Box/Fast Food Business Problem
Section(s): 

Series | Class War for Idiots, Part 1: The Roots of Stalin in the Koch Brothers and the Tea Party Movement

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  • The Koch family, America's biggest financial backers of the Tea Party, would not be the billionaires they are today were it not for the godless empire of the USSR. 
  • A People's History of Koch Industries
  • The Great American Class War
  • We Are In a Class War

Yasha Levine, The eXiled Online

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Lydia Howell.

Stalin-Tea-Party-470x297.jpg April 16, 2010 | Everyone knows that Tea Party revolutionaries fear and hate socialism about as much as the Antichrist. Which is funny, because the Tea Party movement’s dirty little secret is that it owes its existence to the grandaddy of all Antichrists: the godless empire of the USSR.

What few realize is that the secretive oil billionaires of the Koch family, the main supporters of the right-wing groups that orchestrated the Tea Party movement, would not have the means to bankroll their favorite causes had it not been for the pile of money the family made working for the Bolsheviks in the late 1920s and early 1930s, building refineries, training Communist engineers and laying down the foundation of Soviet oil infrastructure.

Yasha Levine is an investigative journalist and a founding editor of The eXiled Online. She is currently a roving reporter at Glenn Greenwald's Pando Daily.

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The Great American Class War, Bill Moyers, Huffington Post

  • The people are fighting back and the elites recognize it. There is fear in the investor class as they see people organizing and mobilizing. Corporations are now investing more time and money in preparation to protect themselves from investor actions and legal challenges. The actions of corporations and governments against the people are a sign of their fear, and a sign of our unrealized strength.
  • We Are In a Class War
  • Plutocracy Versus Democracy

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We Are In a Class War, Margaret Flowers and Kevin Zeese, Popular Resistance

November 28, 2013 | The struggle of working Americans takes center stage as Black Friday protests cover the country. The struggle for wages that do not leave families impoverished is one that affects us all and highlights the unfair economy created by a class war waged by the wealthy for decades. The ‘Walmartization’ of the US economy has created a downward spiral in wages and destroyed small businesses and communities while heightening the wealth divide that is at the root of so many problems.

 

 

Food sovereignty In Capitalist System

  • Food sovereignty is about the democratization of food production. Only by coming to terms with the absolute necessity of removing any profit motive from the food supply will all the peoples of the world have the security of knowing that sufficient food is available to all, at all times and in all situations. 
  • Food security for all the world's citizens is just not possible in a capitalist system.

Janet Surman, Countercurrents.org

Cuppa%20Java-lg%20with%2010%20yr%20banner.jpgJournalism with real independence and integrity is a rare thing. All reader supported Evergreene Digest relies on reader donations. Click on the donation button above to make a contribution and support our work.

28 March, 2014 | This is about systems – the food system, the capitalist system and the socialist system.

Following a report in January of this year from the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food (Olivier De Schutter, The transformative potential of the right to food), I first want to question De Schutter's claim that, 'Most of the food systems we have inherited from the 20th century have failed.' If those systems have failed, is it not because they were not suited to working within the global capitalist system? Should we not ask if maybe the UN set the wrong goals within that system? I would like here to challenge some of the basics of why world agencies feel that they have the answer to world problems when history shows repeated failures.

Janet Surman, member of the Socialist Party of Great Britain, a companion party of the World Socialist Movement, the website of which has a wide range of information regarding socialism including publications, FAQs, audio-visuals, a monthly down-loadable journal, a forum and a blog

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Monsanto’s scary new scheme: Why does it really want all this data? Lina Khan, Salon

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  • As the biotech giant pays huge sums for data analysis about farms, many are terrified about how it might be harnessed.
  • The big question is who exactly will end up owning all this data, and who gets to determine how it is used. 
Section(s): 

Special Project | America's Economic Crisis: Week Ending March 16, 2014

  • “…it seems that our remedies are instinctively those which aggravate the sickness: the remedies are expressions of the sickness itself“. --Thomas Merton
  • 9 New Items including:
    • Series | Are Polluting Mining Corporations like PolyMet Sociopathic?
    • The Real Welfare Queens
    • Why There's No Outcry
    • Liberty, Equality, Efficiency
    • Special Project | The Fight for the American Dream, Week of March 2, 2014
    • Fear is Why Workers in Red States Vote Against Their Economic Self-interest
    • Next Time Someone Argues For 'Trickle-Down' Economics, Show Them This
    • The Zombie Numbers That Rule the U.S. Economy
    • Obama’s low-wage “recovery”

David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

Milt Priggee

Series | Are Polluting Mining Corporations like PolyMet Sociopathic?, Part II, Gary G. Kohls, Duty to Warn

  • "Slavery is the legal fiction that a person is property. Corporate personhood is the legal fiction that property is a person." -- Anonymous
  • Series | Are Polluting Mining Corporations like PolyMet Sociopathic?, Part I 
  • Duluth doctors: PolyMet study skips health impacts

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The Real Welfare Queens, David Sirota, In These Times

  • Most of the political rhetoric about dependency is punitively aimed at the poor. That’s because, unlike the huge corporations receiving all those subsidies, the poor don’t have armies of lobbyists and truckloads of campaign contributions.
  • A new report shows corporations like Koch Industries have gotten billions in government subsidies.
  • Series | Are Polluting Mining Corporations like PolyMet Sociopathic?, Part II
  • Series | Are Polluting Mining Corporations like PolyMet Sociopathic?, Part I
  • Duluth doctors: PolyMet study skips health impacts

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Why There's No Outcry, Robert Reich, Huffington Post

  • 01/25/2014 | People ask me all the time why we don't have a revolution in America, or at least a major wave of reform similar to that of the Progressive Era or the New Deal or the Great Society.
  • Middle incomes are sinking, the ranks of the poor are swelling, almost all the economic gains are going to the top, and big money is corrupting our democracy. So why isn't there more of a ruckus?The answer is complex, but three reasons stand out.

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Liberty, Equality, Efficiency, Paul Krugman, New York (NY) Times

  • Taking action to reduce the extreme inequality of 21st-century America would probably increase, not reduce, economic growth.
  • In short, what’s good for the 1 percent isn’t good for America. And we don’t have to keep living in a new Gilded Age if we don’t want to.
  • Why There's No Outcry

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Bill Day

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Special Project | The Fight for the American Dream, Week of March 2, 2014, David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

  • "The top 1-percent have the best houses, the best educations, the best doctors, and the best lifestyles," Nobel Prize winner Joseph E. Stiglitz concludes, "but there is one thing that money doesn't seem to have bought: an understanding that their fate is bound up with how the other 99-percent live. Throughout history, this is something that the top 1-percent eventually do learn. Too late."
  • 9 New Items including:
    • How Govt. Hides the Poor: Formula for Measuring Poverty Dates to When a Loaf of Bread Cost 22 Cents
    • Special Project | From the Archives: Conservatives Oppose Minimum Wage Increase. Wow. Really?
    • Amazon’s sick brutality and secret history of ruthlessly intimidating workers
    • The poverty that Paul Ryan ignores
    • Support for the $15 Minimum Wage
    • The Meaning of Decent Society
    • The new face of food stamps: working-age Americans
    • The global plutocracy

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Fear is Why Workers in Red States Vote Against Their Economic Self-interest, Robert Reich

  • People are so desperate for jobs they don’t want to rock the boat. They don’t want rules and regulations enforced that might cost them their livelihoods.
  • The Plight of the Employed

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Next Time Someone Argues For 'Trickle-Down' Economics, Show Them This, Kathleen Miles, Huffington Post 

  • The highest-earning 20 percent of Americans have been making more and more over the past 40 years. Yet no other boats have risen; in fact, they're sinking. Over the same 40 years, the lowest-earning 60 percent of Americans have been making less and less.
  • Obama’s low-wage “recovery”

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The Zombie Numbers That Rule the U.S. Economy, Zachary Karabell, The Atlantic

  • Figures like gross domestic product were appropriate for their own time. But today, they paint a consistently misleading portrait of America.
  • Obama’s low-wage “recovery”

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Obama’s low-wage “recovery” Jerry White, World Socialist Website

  • The experience of the Obama administration, which has overseen the greatest explosion of social inequality in US history, while accelerating the attack on democratic rights and war-mongering policies of his Republican predecessor, has provoked widespread disgust and anger. The president’s election-year rhetoric about “equality” and his proposals for token “reforms” is largely falling on deaf ears.
  • Mass unemployment in America

 

Section(s): 

Liberty, Equality, Efficiency

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  • Taking action to reduce the extreme inequality of 21st-century America would probably increase, not reduce, economic growth.
  • In short, what’s good for the 1 percent isn’t good for America. And we don’t have to keep living in a new Gilded Age if we don’t want to.
  • Why There's No Outcry

Paul Krugman, New York (NY) Times

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8719-paul-krugman-020113.jpgPaul Krugman. (photo: NYT) 

March 9, 2014 | Most people, if pressed on the subject, would probably agree that extreme income inequality is a bad thing, although a fair number of conservatives believe that the whole subject of income distribution should be banned from public discourse. (Rick Santorum, the former senator and presidential candidate, wants to ban the term “middle class,” which he says is “class-envy, leftist language.” Who knew?) But what can be done about it?

The standard answer in American politics is, “Not much.” Almost 40 years ago Arthur Okun, chief economic adviser to President Lyndon Johnson, published a classic book titled “Equality and Efficiency: The Big Tradeoff,” arguing that redistributing income from the rich to the poor takes a toll on economic growth. Okun’s book set the terms for almost all the debate that followed: liberals might argue that the efficiency costs of redistribution were small, while conservatives argued that they were large, but everybody knew that doing anything to reduce inequality would have at least some negative impact on G.D.P.

The Nobel Prize-winning New York Times Op-Ed columnist Paul Krugman comments on economics and politics.

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Related:

Why There's No Outcry, Robert Reich, Huffington Post

01/25/2014 | People ask me all the time why we don't have a revolution in America, or at least a major wave of reform similar to that of the Progressive Era or the New Deal or the Great Society.

Middle incomes are sinking, the ranks of the poor are swelling, almost all the economic gains are going to the top, and big money is corrupting our democracy. So why isn't there more of a ruckus? The answer is complex, but three reasons stand out.

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