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UN Officially Declares that UK's Austerity Policies Violate Human Rights

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  • 'It is clear that since 2010, ministers were fully aware that their policies would hit lower income groups hardest.'
  • Women, minorities, young people, and people with disabilities were disproportionately affected, the authors said.
  • Related: The Real Meaning of Brexit: Cry of Pain by the World's Working People

Nadia Prupis, Common Dreams

 

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http://www.commondreams.org/sites/default/files/styles/cd_large/public/headlines/austerity_3.jpg?itok=KxqR6zyFProtesters march against austerity in London in June 2015. (Photo: Jason/flickr/cc) 

Thursday, June 30, 2016 | The UK government's austerity policies violate international human rights, and growing inequality in the nation is cause for "serious concerns," a damning new report by the United Nations has found.

The UN Committee on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights found that six years after the Conservative party took power and extended the previous Coalition's stringent economic practices, UK residents have faced an increased reliance on food banks, rising unemployment rates, a housing crisis, and growing racism and discrimination, among other impacts.

Women, minorities, young people, and people with disabilities were disproportionately affected, the authors said.

Nadia Prupis, staff writer, Common Dreams

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Related:

https://www.project-syndicate.org/default/library/b71da4aa7fcc049ed6f3f525bb4acda6.landscapeLarge.jpgThe Real Meaning of Brexit: Cry of Pain by the World's Working People, Michael Lerner, editor, Tikkun magazine & Chair, the (interfaith and secular-humanist-and-atheist-welcoming) NSP: Network of Spiritual Progressives

Tikkun Editor’s Introductory Note:  The vote by a majority in the UK to exit from the European Union  (Britain exiting, now called Brexit) is actually a cry of pain by the working people of Britain, and a reflection of the growing pain that will shape the social and political lives of our world in the coming decades till that pain is fully addressed.

 

Paul Krugman: The “free-market fantasy” has “always and everywhere proved delusional”

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You can't just "deregulate and unleash the magic of the markets," Krugman warned

Scott Kaufman, Salon

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http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Paul%20Krugman.jpgPaul Krugman (Credit: AP/Heribert Proepper)

Friday, Jun 17, 2016 | In his Friday New York Times column, Paul Krugman discussed the upcoming “Brexit” vote, in which the British will decide whether or not to remain in the European Union.

He argued that despite the fact that “the E.U. is deeply dysfunctional and shows few signs of reforming,” he would vote to remain in it for the simple reason that “Brexit would make Britain poorer.”

Scott Kaufman is an assistant editor at Salon. He taught at a university, but then thought better of it.

Global Warming Threatens the Material Basis of the Global Economy

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Tim Radford, Climate News Network / TruthDig

http://www.truthdig.com/images/eartothegrounduploads/CROP-typhoon-palms-800x400.jpgTyphoon Haiyan in the Philippines destroyed half the world’s production of coconut oil in 2013. (Henry Donati/UK Department for International Development via Flickr)  

June 17, 2016 Climate change is likely to affect the global economy—and it may already have begun to affect raw material supplies from tropical regions, according to new research.

That is because, in a global economy, the flow of wealth depends on a secure supply chain, and productivity that depends on outdoor work in the tropics could become more precarious in a warming world.

Even in a temperate zone country such as Australia, researchers have linked heat extremes with economic losses. And climate-related disasters are on the increase, claiming not just lives but a growing economic toll.

Tim Radford worked for the Guardian for 32 years as science editor. He has been covering climate change since 1988. He won the Association of British Science Writers award for science writer of the year four times, and a lifetime achievement award in 2005. 

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Related:

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http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/No%20Shame%3F%20Donate%21.jpgWhat Corporate America Would Do If It Really Cared About Climate Change, Joe Conason, In These Times 

 

  • CEOs are professing to care about the climate. But they’re still funding Republican climate-change deniers.
  • Related: The breathtaking human toll of environmental pollution

As jobs vanish, forgetting what government is for

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Though the decline of well-paid working class jobs is often portrayed as the inevitable consequence of globalization and technological change, it is in large part the result of a failure of government.

Eduardo Porter, New York Times / Tampa Bay Times

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http://www.tampabay.com/resources/images/dti/rendered/2016/05/per_eporter051516_17212629_8col.jpg Construction on the $650 million St. Croix River Crossing bridge that will connect Oak Park Heights, Minn., and St. Joseph, Wis. Investing in the nation’s crumbling infrastructure is one way to bolster the economy. New York Times

Friday, May 13, 2016  | America has been here before.

At the dawn of the 20th century, the economy was already well into a fundamental transformation of the labor force, as industry replaced farming and crafts as the primary source of new jobs. The shift was painful, spawning protest movements and political forces like progressivism. But the United States emerged from the turmoil far more prosperous and powerful.

Notably, the jobs of the new industrial economy were generally more productive and better paid than the jobs it left behind.

Eduardo Porter writes the Economic Scene column for the New York Times. Formerly he was a  member of The Times’ editorial board, where he wrote about business, economics, and a mix of other matters.

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