You are here

Economics

Economics Logo

Pat Bagley | Snyder Poisons Flint / media.cagle.com

http://media.cagle.com/53/2016/01/18/174239_600.jpg

Section(s): 

Paul Krugman: The “free-market fantasy” has “always and everywhere proved delusional”

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/New%20Economic%20Perspectives%20banner.jpg

You can't just "deregulate and unleash the magic of the markets," Krugman warned

Scott Kaufman, Salon

http://www.evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/twitter-4-512.png Now you can follow Evergreene Digest on Twitter

 

 


http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Paul%20Krugman.jpgPaul Krugman (Credit: AP/Heribert Proepper)

Friday, Jun 17, 2016 | In his Friday New York Times column, Paul Krugman discussed the upcoming “Brexit” vote, in which the British will decide whether or not to remain in the European Union.

He argued that despite the fact that “the E.U. is deeply dysfunctional and shows few signs of reforming,” he would vote to remain in it for the simple reason that “Brexit would make Britain poorer.”

Scott Kaufman is an assistant editor at Salon. He taught at a university, but then thought better of it.

Global Warming Threatens the Material Basis of the Global Economy

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Environment%20Banner.jpg

Tim Radford, Climate News Network / TruthDig

http://www.truthdig.com/images/eartothegrounduploads/CROP-typhoon-palms-800x400.jpgTyphoon Haiyan in the Philippines destroyed half the world’s production of coconut oil in 2013. (Henry Donati/UK Department for International Development via Flickr)  

June 17, 2016 Climate change is likely to affect the global economy—and it may already have begun to affect raw material supplies from tropical regions, according to new research.

That is because, in a global economy, the flow of wealth depends on a secure supply chain, and productivity that depends on outdoor work in the tropics could become more precarious in a warming world.

Even in a temperate zone country such as Australia, researchers have linked heat extremes with economic losses. And climate-related disasters are on the increase, claiming not just lives but a growing economic toll.

Tim Radford worked for the Guardian for 32 years as science editor. He has been covering climate change since 1988. He won the Association of British Science Writers award for science writer of the year four times, and a lifetime achievement award in 2005. 

Full story … 

Related:

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Banner%20Corporate%20Accountability.jpg

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/No%20Shame%3F%20Donate%21.jpgWhat Corporate America Would Do If It Really Cared About Climate Change, Joe Conason, In These Times 

 

  • CEOs are professing to care about the climate. But they’re still funding Republican climate-change deniers.
  • Related: The breathtaking human toll of environmental pollution

As jobs vanish, forgetting what government is for

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/New%20Economic%20Perspectives%20banner.jpg

Though the decline of well-paid working class jobs is often portrayed as the inevitable consequence of globalization and technological change, it is in large part the result of a failure of government.

Eduardo Porter, New York Times / Tampa Bay Times

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Coffee%20%26%20Paper%20Graphic.jpg Journalism with real independence and integrity is a rare thing. All reader supported Evergreene Digest relies - exclusively!- on reader donations. Click on the donation button above to make a contribution and support our work.

http://www.tampabay.com/resources/images/dti/rendered/2016/05/per_eporter051516_17212629_8col.jpg Construction on the $650 million St. Croix River Crossing bridge that will connect Oak Park Heights, Minn., and St. Joseph, Wis. Investing in the nation’s crumbling infrastructure is one way to bolster the economy. New York Times

Friday, May 13, 2016  | America has been here before.

At the dawn of the 20th century, the economy was already well into a fundamental transformation of the labor force, as industry replaced farming and crafts as the primary source of new jobs. The shift was painful, spawning protest movements and political forces like progressivism. But the United States emerged from the turmoil far more prosperous and powerful.

Notably, the jobs of the new industrial economy were generally more productive and better paid than the jobs it left behind.

Eduardo Porter writes the Economic Scene column for the New York Times. Formerly he was a  member of The Times’ editorial board, where he wrote about business, economics, and a mix of other matters.

Full story … 

Section(s): 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 9: The Need for a New Economic System

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/New%20Economic%20Perspectives%20banner.jpg

  • We need a new economic system, a new society, a new social contract, a new way of life. Here are the great tasks that history has given to our generation.
  • This is the ninth and final installment in a nine-part series looking at the need for a new economic system. Previous installments are listed below.

John Scales Avery, Countercurrents.org

http://globalassets.starbucks.com/assets/20229527c1c240439ddbc81bf821d95e.jpg If you like reading this article, consider joining the crew of all reader-supported Evergreene Digest by contributing the equivalent of a cafe latte a month--using the donation button above—so we can bring you more just like it.

 


http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31VZKSO24bL._SX351_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg 22 August, 2015 | We must achieve a steady-state economic system

A steady-state economic system is necessary because neither population growth nor economic growth can continue indefinitely on a finite earth. No one can maintain that exponential industrial growth is sustainable in the long run except by refusing to look more than a short distance into the future.

Of course, it is necessary to distinguish between industrial growth, and growth of culture and knowledge, which can and should continue to grow. Qualitative improvements in human society are possible and desirable, but resource-using and pollution-producing industrial growth is reaching its limits, both because of ecological constraints and because of the exhaustion of petroleum, natural gas and other non-renewable resources, such as metals. The threat of catastrophic climate change makes it imperative for us to stop using fossil fuels within very few decades.

John Scales Avery is a theoretical chemist noted for his research publications in quantum chemistry, thermodynamics, evolution, and history of science. Since the early 1990s, Avery has been an active World peace activist. 

Full story … 

Related:

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 8: The Cooperative Movement

In the future, small cooperative communities, like the Ghandian villages or Transition Towns, may be able to give us not only a more sustainable way of life, but also increased happiness, based warm life-long friendships and the pleasure of doing good to others.

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 7: The Coming Global Food Crisis

The resources of the earth and the techniques of modern science can support a global population of moderate size in comfort and security; but the optimum size is undoubtedly smaller than the world's present population

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 6: Adverse Effects Of Globalization

We need instead to reform our economic system and to give it both a social conscience and an ecological conscience. Let us restore democracy! Let us have governments that work for the welfare of all their citizens, rather than for the enormous enrichment of the few!

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 5: The Threats And Costs Of War

Can we not rid ourselves of both nuclear weapons and the institution of war itself? We must act quickly and resolutely before our beautiful world and everything that we love are reduced to radioactive ashes.

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 4: Neocolonialism And Resource Wars

In addition to the enormous suffering, waste, injustice and ecological destruction produced by modern wars, we must recognize that in an era of thermonuclear weapons, war has become prohibitively dangerous. Therefore we need a new economic system.

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 3: Climate Change and the Urgent Need for Renewable Energy 

One of the greatest threats to the survival of the human species and the biosphere is catastrophic climate change. 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 2: Entropy and Economics 

We urgently need to shift quickly from fossil fuels to renewable energy if we are to avoid a tipping point after which human efforts to avoid catastrophic climate change will be futile because feedback loops will have taken over. 

Series | The Need for a New Economic System, Part 1: Limits to Economic Growth

It is obvious that on a finite Earth, neither population growth nor economic growth can continue indefinitely.

Section(s): 

Pages