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Special Report | Disability: Republican health plan undermines special education, too

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School Classroom. Photo by David Spero/Gallery Stock

  • At a certain point, congressional Republicans stop looking like American policymakers and start looking like villains from a Dickens novel.
  • Related: Epic Plea to GOP: "You are the single greatest threat to my family."

Steve Benen, MSNBC

http://www.commondreams.org/sites/default/files/styles/cd_large/public/headlines/singlepayernow.jpg?itok=VXxef7oO "In the United States, the right to medical care remains a dream deferred." (Photo: Juhan Sonin/flickr/cc) 

05/04/17 | At first blush, it may seem counter-intuitive to think the Republicans’ regressive health care plan would affect education policy. It’s bad enough to realize GOP lawmakers are prepared to take away health care coverage for tens of millions of Americans, but if they’re going to target schools, they’ll have to do so in a different bill, right?

Wrong. The New York Times reports:

"With all the sweeping changes the Republican bill would impose, little attention has been paid to its potential impact on education. School districts rely on Medicaid, the federal health care program for the poor, to provide costly services to millions of students with disabilities across the country."

Steve Benen: Producer, The Rachel Maddow Show

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Epic Plea to GOP: "You are the single greatest threat to my family."  Trump Resistance Movement (TRM), act.tv

GOP Representative Tom MacArthur was not ready for this. This man brought the house down speaking his mind.

How America Outlawed Adolescence

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André Chung

  • At least 22 states make it a crime to disturb school in ways that teenagers are wired to do. Why did this happen?
  • Related: From the Archives | Where Do We Draw the Line When It Comes to Zero Tolerance in Schools?

Amanda Ripley, the Atlantic

November, 2016 | One monday morning last fall, at Spring Valley High School in Columbia, South Carolina, a 16-year-old girl refused to hand over her cellphone to her algebra teacher. After multiple requests, the teacher called an administrator, who eventually summoned a sheriff’s deputy who was stationed at the school. The deputy walked over to the girl’s desk. “Are you going to come with me,” he said, “or am I going to make you?”

Niya Kenny, a student sitting nearby, did not know the name of the girl who was in trouble. That girl was new to class and rarely spoke. But Kenny had heard stories about the deputy, Ben Fields, who also coached football at the school, and she had a feeling he might do something extreme. “Take out your phones,” she whispered to the boys sitting next to her, and she did the same. The girl still hadn’t moved. While Kenny watched, recording with her iPhone, Fields wrenched the girl’s right arm behind her and grabbed her left leg. The girl flailed a fist in his direction. As he tried to wrestle her out of her chair, the desk it was attached to flipped over, slamming the girl backwards. Then he reached for her again, extracting her this time, and hurled her across the classroom floor.

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From the Archives | Where Do We Draw the Line When It Comes to Zero Tolerance in Schools? T.C. Kelly, Free Advice Legal

  • It is with good reason that the Justice Department has urged schools to abandon their zealous enforcement of zero tolerance policies. Some administrators are reluctant to do so because zero tolerance policies allow administrators to deflect blame for their actions by saying “I’m just enforcing the policy.” But the Due Process Clause requires schools to treat students fairly. That means exercising judgment to distinguish behaviors that merit punishment from those that don’t. The wise exercise of discretion might be more difficult than the blind enforcement of a zero tolerance policy, but it is also more just.
  • Related: The West’s War on Children

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Nothin’ but Debt: Which NCAA Tournament Schools Give Low-Income Students the Best Shot?

 

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(Credit: Getty/Al Bello) 

So who fares well in this tournament?

Mike Tigas and Olga Pierce, ProPublica  

March 16, 2017 | We used federal data to create an NCAA Tournament bracket based on five factors that measure each school’s ability to graduate low-income students with little debt: the percentage of undergraduates from low-income households, the average financial support given to those students, the tuition discount that those students receive, their post-graduation debt, and the percentage of those students who are unable to pay back their loans after graduation.

Click any game in the bracket below to view more information on how both schools fare in each Debt by Degrees head-to-head matchup. You can also compare any two schools by clicking here.

 

Mike Tigas is a News Applications Developer at ProPublica. He also works on tools for online privacy and the liberation of public data.

Olga Pierce is the Deputy Data Editor. Previously, she was a reporter at ProPublica, specializing in data-driven stories.

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March Madness and money: Should American universities spend so much serious cash on sports? David MasciotraSalon

  • Most college athletic programs are a financial burden to their schools. As higher ed costs increase, why keep them?
  • Related: From the Archives | The Problem with Subsidizing Huge Stadiums for Billionaire Team Owners

In wake of immigration orders, a Minneapolis charter network offers 'worst-case' training for students

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Hiawatha Academies has been nationally recognized for its success in closing the opportunity gap that characterizes much of the public school sector in Minnesota. MinnPost photo by Erin Hinrichs

  • “We’re the one who help navigate and build relationships with not just students, but families,” he said. “That’s a bond that’s really important and really special. If definitely makes it easier to say I’m gonna stand up and be there for you no matter what.” --Ryan Williams-Virden, a dean of students and social studies teacher at the network's high school. 
  • Related: New Study Found No Link Between Immigration and Increased Crime in Forty Years of Data,
  • Related: The Positive Effects of Sanctuary Policies on Crime and the Economy

Erin Hinrichs, MinnPost

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http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/INS%20Visa%20Approval%20Stamp.jpg  03/03/17 | Minnesota has long been home to school tornado drills. And in response to school shootings across the country, school lockdown drills have become commonplace as well.

Now, following President Donald Trump’s policy directives regarding immigration, Hiawatha Academies — a charter school network in south Minneapolis that serves a student population that’s 99 percent students of color and 64 percent English Language Learners — has added another “worst-case-scenario” training for students: What to do in the event of a federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raid or the detention of a family member.

Erin Hinrichs is MinnPost's K-12 education reporter. A Gustavus Adolphus grad, she also has a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Hinrichs' coverage ranges from local school board meetings to national education policies, with a special focus on the efforts to improve outcomes for all students in Minnesota.

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New Study Found No Link Between Immigration and Increased Crime in Forty Years of Data, Science News Journal

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  • Politicians often claim that there is a relationship between immigration patterns and increased crime. In a study done at the University at Buffalo however, no links were found between the two. According to the findings, immigration instead appears to be linked to reductions in some types of crimes instead.
  • Related: The Positive Effects of Sanctuary Policies on Crime and the Economy

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Trump's Austerity Budget Increases Military Recruiters' Power to Prey on Youth

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Rory Fanning speaks in Japan on a Veterans for Peace trip in 2016. (Photo: Yoshiaki Kawakami)

Since election night 2016, the streets of the US have rung with resistance. People all over the country have woken up with the conviction that they must do something to fight inequality in all its forms. But many are wondering what it is they can do. In this ongoing "Interviews for Resistance" series, experienced organizers, troublemakers and thinkers share their insights on what works, what doesn't, what has changed and what is still the same. Today's interview is the 23rd in the series. Click here for the most recent interview before this one.

Sarah Jaffe, Truthout

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Friday, March 24, 2017 | Donald Trump's budget slashes social programs while inflating an already massive military budget, meaning that for many people in already underserved and underemployed communities, the military will be the closest thing to a welfare state they have.

https://riseuptimes.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/if-war-is-the-answer.jpg?w=540 Today we bring you a conversation with Rory Fanning, a veteran and conscientious objector, and author of the book Worth Fighting For: An Army Ranger's Journey Out of the Military and Across America. His work centers on opposing US militarism at home. He is also the coauthor, with Craig Hodges, of the new book Long Shot: The Triumphs and Struggles of an NBA Freedom Fighter. He lives in Chicago, which has become ground zero for military recruiting in the country, and often speaks at high schools there. "There are more kids signed up in Chicago JROTC and NJROTC than any other school district in the country; ten thousand kids: 50 percent Latino and 45 percent Black," he told me. We spoke about opposing Trump's military buildup, the roles that veterans and athletes can play in movements for change, and the long tradition of imperialism in the US.

Sarah Jaffe is a reporting fellow at The Nation Institute and has covered labor, social and economic justice and politics for Truthout, The Atlantic, The Guardian, In These Times and many other publications. She is the cohost of Belabored, a labor podcast hosted by Dissent magazine, and the author of Necessary Trouble: Americans In Revolt (Nation Books, 2016). 

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