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Daryl Cagle | Betsy DeVos and the Department of Education

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Noam Chomsky on the Perils of Market-Driven Education

  • Free higher education could be instituted without major economic or cultural difficulties, it seems. The same is true of a rational public health system like that of comparable countries.
  • World-renowned linguist, social critic and activist Noam Chomsky shares his views on education and culture in this exclusive interview for Truthout.
  • Related: When schools become dead zones of the imagination

C.J. Polychroniou and Lily Sage, Truthout 

http://www.truth-out.org/images/Images_2016_10/2016_1022chomsky_.jpg Free higher education could be instituted without major difficulties, but neoliberalism is standing in the way. (Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout)

Saturday, 22 October 2016 |  Throughout most of the modern period, beginning with the era known as the Enlightenment, education was widely regarded as the most important asset for the building of a decent society. However, this value seems to have fallen out of favor in the contemporary period, perhaps as a reflection of the dominance of the neoliberal ideology, creating in the process a context where education has been increasingly reduced to the attainment of professional, specialized skills that cater to the needs of the business world.

What is the actual role of education and its link to democracy, to decent human relations and to a decent society? What defines a cultured and decent society? World-renowned linguist, social critic and activist Noam Chomsky shares his views on education and culture in this exclusive interview for Truthout.

C.J. Polychroniou is a political economist/political scientist who has taught and worked in universities and research centers in Europe and the United States.

And Lily Sage is a Montessori pedagogue who is interested in questions of symbiosis, intersectional feminism and anti-racist/fascist praxis.

Full story … 

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When schools become dead zones of the imagination, Henry A. Giroux, Philosophers for Change

  • Some of us who have already begun to break the silence of the night have found that the calling to speak is often a vocation of agony, but we must speak. We must speak with all the humility that is appropriate to our limited vision, but we must speak. — Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • A critical pedagogy manifesto
  • Related: Today’s Students and Professors ‘Know Hardly Anything about Anything at All’
  • Related: How Billionaires Are Successfully Fooling Us Into Destroying Public Education—and Why Privatization Is a Terrible Idea

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Why Schools Should Teach Rational Discourse

  • It used to be that logic, one of the main components of rational debate, was taught in schools. Is it time we considered reinstating the study of logic in today’s schools in order to restore rational discourse in the nation?
  • Related: Trump Won Because Voters Are Ignorant, Literally

Annie Holmquist, Intellectual Takeout 

http://www.intellectualtakeout.org/sites/ito/files/angrystudents.pngNovember 14, 2016 | The day before the election, the Minneapolis Star Tribune ran a revealing story on the state of rational discourse in today’s schools.

The story centered on two young men – Elijah Rockhold and Sam Buisman – from the public high school in Chanhassen, a suburb of the Twin Cities. Although Rockhold and Buisman are on different sides of the political aisle, they came together to create an after school club in which students could discuss political ideas without emotional arguments. The reason they started this club is rather telling:

“Chanhassen High lacked a forum for political discourse, Rockhold said, and teachers were hesitant to talk about politics at all.

Annie Holmquist is a senior writer with Intellectual Takeout. She assists with website content production and social media messaging.  

Full story … 

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Trump Won Because Voters Are Ignorant, Literally, Jason Brennan, Foreign Policy <>

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  • Democracy is supposed to enact the will of the people. But what if the people have no clue what they’re doing?
  • Related: Thinking Dangerously In Age Of Normalized Ignorance

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Special Report | What You Need to Know About the Privatization of Our Public Schools

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  • School privatization has too often resulted in self-dealing, corruption, thousands of failed schools, and attempts, often successful, to dislodge and usurp local school boards—often community beacons of local democracy. Many boards have been replaced with a corporate model of school control, with virtually no transparency.
  • Related:  How Billionaires Are Successfully Fooling Us Into Destroying Public Education—and Why Privatization Is a Terrible Idea.

Don Hazen, AlterNet

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Front_Cover_Who_Controls_Our_Schools_lo-res.jpgOctober 20, 2016 | Greetings,

Over the last two decades, a major struggle over control of public schools in America has put our children’s education at risk. Several dozen billionaires, through a powerful infrastructure they established, are attempting to privatize as many K-12 schools as they can—6,700, at last count. There has been plenty of resistance, and the battle continues.

AlterNet.org has covered the school privatization story in great detail. Over time, AlterNet’s parent organization, the Independent Media Institute (IMI), became alarmed at what we were seeing through this coverage, and have responded with a report titled, Who Controls Our Schools? The Privatization of American Public Education. Click here to access the report on your computer, phone, tablet, or e-reader.

School privatization has too often resulted in self-dealing, corruption, thousands of failed schools, and attempts, often successful, to dislodge and usurp local school boards—often community beacons of local democracy. Many boards have been replaced with a corporate model of school control, with virtually no transparency.

Some good things have happened as well, of course. Not all charter schools are bad. There are parent-organized and community-run charter schools doing great things in many locales—but they are increasingly few and far between. At this point, more than 40% of all charter schools are part of national and regional chains, often with no roots in the community.

We are sending you this report because we want to share what we now know about this important, but too little discussed, topic. You might say, “But I’m not interested in public schools”—which is understandable. But we believe that privatizing public schools so that the super-wealthy can profit and impose their ideologies is anti-democratic to its core. This is an issue that affects us all.

Our report draws on extensive research, investigative reporting, and industry publications to show what is happening in our communities and explain why school privatization has taken hold in some cities.

Please, if you could give the report a read, we would appreciate it. And we would love to know what you think; send comments to comments@alternet.org. If you have friends or colleagues who might be interested, please forward them a copy, too.

I hope you enjoy it.

Peace,

Don Hazen
Executive Director
Independent Media Institute

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How Billionaires Are Successfully Fooling Us Into Destroying Public Education—and Why Privatization Is a Terrible Idea, Diane Ravitch, Basic Books / AlterNet

  • The billionaire-backed privatization movement is stealthily advancing an undemocratic agenda, cloaked in deceptive rhetoric, that the public is not aware of and does not understand.
  • Related: When schools become dead zones of the imagination, Henry A. Giroux <www.henryagiroux.com>, Philosophers for Change

 

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How Billionaires Are Successfully Fooling Us Into Destroying Public Education—and Why Privatization Is a Terrible Idea

The billionaire-backed privatization movement is stealthily advancing an undemocratic agenda, cloaked in deceptive rhetoric, that the public is not aware of and does not understand.

Related: When schools become dead zones of the imagination, Henry A. Giroux <www.henryagiroux.com>, Philosophers for Change

Diane Ravitch, Basic Books / AlterNet

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http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Editor%20Comment%20graphic_0.jpg Evergreene Digest Editor's Note: The following is an excerpt from the new, expanded edition of  The Death and Life of the Great American School System by Diane Ravitch (Basic Books, 2016). 

July 21, 2016 | Something unprecedented is happening to American public education. A powerful, well-funded, well-organized movement is seeking to privatize significant numbers of public schools and destroy the teaching profession. This movement is not a conspiracy; it operates in the open. But its goals are masked by deceptive rhetoric. It calls itself a “reform” movement, but its true goal is privatization.

This movement has had strange bedfellows. Some of its funders and promoters on the far right of the political spectrum are motivated by ideological contempt for the public sector; others earnestly believe they are providing better choices for poor children “trapped in failing schools.” Still others believe that elected local school boards are incompetent and should be replaced by private management, or that the private sector is inherently more innovative and effective than the public sector. And some are motivated by greed, while others are motivated by religious conviction. These strange bedfellows have included the US Department of Education (during the administrations of George W. Bush and Barack Obama); major foundations and think tanks, both conservative and centrist; billionaires committed to free-market solutions—and certain they know what is best because they are so rich; entrepreneurs hoping to make money from school privatization or by selling technology to replace teachers; the far-right American Legisla­tive Exchange Council (ALEC), which has drafted model legislation to promote corporate interests and to expand the privatization of almost all government services, including education; and numerous governors and legislators (mostly but not exclusively Republicans) who want schools to operate in a free-market system of school choice.

Diane Ravitch is Research Professor of Education at New York University and a historian of education.

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When schools become dead zones of the imagination, Henry A. Giroux, Philosophers for Change

  • Some of us who have already begun to break the silence of the night have found that the calling to speak is often a vocation of agony, but we must speak. We must speak with all the humility that is appropriate to our limited vision, but we must speak. — Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • A critical pedagogy manifesto
  • Related: Today’s Students and Professors ‘Know Hardly Anything about Anything at All’

 

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