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Politics Plaguing School Lunches

  • The new regulations, with their increased emphasis on fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, are a responsible way to adress and curb childhood obesity as well as to educate students about the value of a well-balanced meal.
  • First Lady Responds To School Meal Critics

Nick Stumo-Langer, Minnesota 2020 

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school_lunch_smile.jpgJune 27, 2014 | If you haven’t heard, the national 2010 legislation requiring schools to include more whole grains, vegetables and fruits at the cost of gradually reducing starch, sodium and calories is under attack by the big-food-corporation-funded School Nutrition Association.

Unfortunately for Minnesota, six of our biggest food companies (Schwan’s, General Mills, Cargill, Land O’Lakes, Hormel and Michael Foods) provide funding to this organization, including its current lobbying effort to provide waivers to school districts to get around these requirements.

Nick Stumo-Langer, Undergraduate Research Fellow, Minnesota 2020

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First Lady Responds To School Meal Critics, Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press / Huffington Post

  • 05/27/2014 | First lady Michelle Obama is striking back at House Republicans who are trying to weaken healthier school meal standards, saying any effort to roll back the guidelines is "unacceptable."
  • The rules set by Congress and the administration over the last several years require more fruits, vegetables and whole grains in the lunch line and set limits on sodium, sugar and fat. The first lady met Tuesday with school nutrition officials who said the guidelines are working in their schools.

 

5 States Gunning to Make Their Kids As Scientifically Illiterate As Possible by Teaching Creationist B.S.

  • Some states have attempted to pass bills that either remove evolution from the curriculum or allow teachers to offer alternative theories.
  • Louisiana, Missouri and others are shamelessly pushing a creationist agenda to appease the Christian right
  • Enforcing School Dress Codes Teaches Girls to be Ashamed, Not 'Modest' 

Dan Arel, AlterNet

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(creationist_square.jpg Credit: 1971yes via Shutterstock)

Wednesday, Jul 2, 2014  | The British government dealt a strong blow to creationists last week when they clarified and extended their laws banning creationism in the classroom to not only free schools, but to academies as well.

Academies, including free schools, are the UK’s version of the charter schools in the US, and there were concerns that, since academies are often run by religious organizations who taught and endorsed creationism in the classroom, kids who attend them were not being taught actual science.

Dan Arel is a freelance writer, speaker and secular advocate.

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Enforcing School Dress Codes Teaches Girls to be Ashamed, Not 'Modest' Jessica Valenti, Guardian (UK) / AlterNet

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  • Everyday school dress codes disproportionately target, shame, and punish girls – especially girls who are more developed than their peers.
  • Teen Girl Kicked Out Of Prom So Her Dress Wouldn’t Lead Boys To ‘Think Impure Thoughts’

 

 

Chris Hedges | Pity the Children

  • War brings with it a host of horrors, but the worst is what it does to children. The suffering of the young, perpetrated by those who carry weapons, exposes war’s demented pathology. 
  • The Great Human Delusion: All Parents Love their Children

Chris Hedges, Truthdig

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AP245310998403.jpg An Afghan child looks toward the site of a suicide bombing that occurred near a NATO convoy in Kabul, Afghanistan's capital, last February.  

Jun 30, 2014 | For the United States, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan will be over soon. We will leave behind, after our defeats, wreckage and death, the contagion of violence and hatred, unending grief, and millions of children who were brutalized and robbed of their childhood. Americans who did not suffer will forget. People maimed physically or psychologically by the violence, especially the Iraqi and Afghan children, will never escape. Time and memory will play their usual tricks. Those who endured war will begin to wonder, years from now, what was real and what was not. And those who did not taste of war’s noxious poison will stop wondering at all.

I sat last Thursday afternoon in a small conference room at the University of Massachusetts Boston with three U.S. combat veterans—two from the war in Iraq, one from the war in Vietnam—along with a Somali who grew up amid the vicious fighting in Mogadishu. All are poets or novelists. They were there to attend a two-week writers workshop sponsored by the William Joiner Institute for the Study of War and Social Consequences. It is their voices and those of their comrades that have to be heeded now, and heeded in the future, if we are to curb our appetite for empire and lust for industrial violence. The truth about war comes out, but always too late. And by the time the drums begin beating, the flags waving and the politicians and press hyperventilating as they shout out their nationalist cant, once again we have forgotten what we learned, as if the debacles of the past had no bearing on the debacles of the future.

Chris Hedges, a weekly columnist for Truthdig, is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who has reported from more than 50 countries, specializing in American politics and society.

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The Great Human Delusion: All Parents Love their Children, Robert J. Burrowes, Special to Evergreene Digest

  • Our world is in trouble. We fight wars, impose exploitative economic relationships on many people and destroy our environment, among many other manifestations of violence. Fundamentally, these problems are all outcomes of our greatest delusion: that we humans love our children. If we are to effectively tackle all of our other problems, then we must include in our strategy learning how to love our children genuinely. Or all of our other efforts will ultimately be in vain.
  • Special Project | The War on Children

 

 

The Great Human Delusion: All Parents Love their Children

  • Our world is in trouble. We fight wars, impose exploitative economic relationships on many people and destroy our environment, among many other manifestations of violence. Fundamentally, these problems are all outcomes of our greatest delusion: that we humans love our children. If we are to effectively tackle all of our other problems, then we must include in our strategy learning how to love our children genuinely. Or all of our other efforts will ultimately be in vain.
  • Special Project | The War on Children

Robert J. Burrowes, Special to Evergreene Digest

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kiddies.jpg June 24, 2014 | Despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, there is a widespread belief that all parents love their children. This is not so. Many parentsare so badly emotionally damaged as a result of their own childhood that they are not capable of loving their children. Moreover, the fear, self-hatred and powerlessness that characterise most humans means that parental violence against children is chronic even if one or both parents are capable of love.

Evolution's great trick was to connect reproduction with intense but transitory sexual pleasure, not love. Couples may engage in sex as a result of love for each other and possibly the desire to create and care for a child. But many children are conceived outside the loving long-term relationship necessary to nurture a child and even those children who are conceived within this framework will routinely suffer parental violence. And without genuine communities, as occurs in tribal situations, modern nuclear families leave children isolated from the readily available emotional support options that a more closeknit community would offer.

Robert J. Burrowes has a lifetime commitment to understanding and ending human violence. He has done extensive research since 1966 in an effort to understand why human beings are violent and has been a nonviolent activist since 1981. He is the author of 'Why Violence?' http://tinyurl.com/whyviolence His email address is flametree@riseup.net and his website is at http://robertjburrowes.wordpress.com

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Related:

Special Project | The War on Children: Week Ending  June 8, 2014, David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

  • The United States is one of the few countries in the world that puts children in supermax prisons, tries them as adults, incarcerates them for exceptionally long periods of time, defines them as super predators, pepper sprays them for engaging in peaceful protests, and, in an echo of the discourse of the war on terror, describes them as 'teenage time bombs.' 
  • 8 New Items including:
    • Charter Schools Are Cheating Your Kids
    • Enforcing School Dress Codes Teaches Girls to be Ashamed, Not 'Modest'
    • The Overprotected Kid
    • Teen Girl Kicked Out Of Prom So Her Dress Wouldn’t Lead Boys To ‘Think Impure Thoughts’
    • Schools and the Formation and Reinforcement of Gender and Racial Sterotypes
    • What We Lose When We Rip the Heart Out of Arts Education
    • Education Fails Children from Disadvantaged Backgrounds
    • Series | The Resegregation of America's Schools, Part 1: James

 

US Education System Fails Students with Disabilities

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  • U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan on Tuesday focuses his quest to improve classroom performance on the 6.5 million students with disabilities, including many who perform poorly on standardized tests.
  • Part 1: These States Are Failing To Follow Disability Law, U.S. Says
  • Part 2: Why Are Huge Numbers of Disabled Students Dropping Out of College?
  • Colleges are full of it!

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

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Part 1: These States Are Failing To Follow Disability Law, U.S. Says

Michael Yudin, assistant secretary for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, stressed that (the) … movement toward integration "shouldn't be separate from, this shouldn't be apart from" the general education system, he said. "We have to own these kids. We all have to own these kids."

Joy Resmovits, Huffington Post

06/24/2014 | U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan on Tuesday focuses his quest to improve classroom performance on the 6.5 million students with disabilities, including many who perform poorly on standardized tests.

Duncan, who has spent his years in the Obama administration using accountability measures in existing laws to drive improvements in student performance, on Tuesday joins Michael Yudin, assistant secretary for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, to announce a new framework for measuring states' compliance with the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act, the federal law that supports special education and services for children with disabilities. The law originally was known as the Education of Handicapped Children Act of 1975.

Joy Resmovits covers education for the Huffington Post

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Part 2: Why Are Huge Numbers of Disabled Students Dropping Out of College?

  • US colleges and universities need to do better at meeting the needs of disabled students.
  • Colleges are full of it!
  • Happiness and disability

s.e. smith, AlterNet 

shutterstock_129978953.jpg Photo Credit: Steven Frame via Shutterstock.com

June 20, 2014  |  When Andrea Chandler, a disabled Navy veteran, used her GI bill funds to go to college, she expected to graduate with a BA that would allow her to build a career and establish a new life for herself. Instead, she never completed the requirements that would have allowed her to transfer to a four-year college, joining the ranks of the many disabled students who are unable to attain a four year degree—despite the rising number of disabled students entering academia.

Today, an estimated 60% of disabled young adults make it to college after high school, yet nearly two thirds are unable to complete their degrees within six years. Is this the fault of their disabilities, or is something more complex at play? The testimony of disabled students suggests that the problem lies not with their disabilities, per se, but with the numerous barriers they encounter in higher education, from failing to provide blind students with readers, to the refusal to accommodate wheelchair users in otherwise accessible classrooms.

s.e. smith is a writer and editor whose work has appeared in Bitch, Feministe, Global Comment, the Sun Herald, the Guardian, and other publications.

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Related:

Colleges are full of it! Thomas Frank, Salon

  • Behind the three-decade scheme to raise tuition, bankrupt generations, and hypnotize the media
  • Tuition is up 1,200 percent in 30 years. Here's why you're unemployed, crushed by debt -- and no one is helping
  • The Best and the Brightest Led America Off a Cliff

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Happiness and disability, Tom Shakespeare, BBC News

Surveys reveal that people with disabilities consistently report a good quality of life, says Tom Shakespeare. So why is it often assumed they are unhappy?

 

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