You are here

Youth & Education

Education Logo

The new school detention, where kids make rules and a prison pipeline ends

  • Forget time-outs and the chalkboard. Student-run courts are all the rage for a reason: they work
  • Want to Change the Education System? Listen to Students!

Dana Goldstein, Guardian (UK)

Starbuck%27s%20Cafe%20Latte%20with%2010%20yr%20banner.jpg If you like reading this article, consider joining the crew of all reader-supported Evergreene Digest by contributing the equivalent of a cafe latte a month--using the donation button above—so we can bring you more just like it.

New federal data shows that across the United States, schools with high rates of black, Latino and poor children tend to respond to bad behavior with aggressive force. Photograph: Picture Partners / Alamy 

Monday 7 April 2014 | Destiny was in eighth grade when, in the middle of an altercation with another student, she grabbed a teacher’s jacket and threw it out of a classroom window.

She was enrolled at the Lyons Community School in Brooklyn, New York, where almost every kid is black or Latino and living in poverty. Only 5% are meeting standards in math and reading. 

Dana Goldstein is a journalist in Brooklyn. Her upcoming book, The Teacher Wars, will be published by Doubleday in September.

Full story…

Related:

Want to Change the Education System? Listen to Students! Hannah Nguyen, The Daily Good

  • "If you had the power to change the education system, what would you do?"
  • Publicly Funded Schools That Are Allowed to Teach Creationism

Want to Change the Education System? Listen to Students!

  • "If you had the power to change the education system, what would you do?"
  • Publicly Funded Schools That Are Allowed to Teach Creationism

Hannah Nguyen, The Daily Good

%2522%40%2522%20Logo%20with%2010%20yr%20banner.jpg To stay on top of important articles like these, sign up here to receive the latest updates from all reader supported Evergreene Digest.

February 19, 2014 | This is my favorite question to ask the students I mentor in Los Angeles. Their responses are wonderfully imaginative, ranging from broader curriculum to outdoor classrooms. However, when I ask them what stops them from fighting for those changes, the answers have a similar ring. "I feel alone." "No one listens to students." "I don't even know where to begin!"

 

As much as it saddens me to hear this, I understand where they're coming from. In recent years, a riveting national conversation about the state of our education system and the reforms it needs has been sparked. Unfortunately, these conversations are often dominated by those furthest from the classroom, and ironically, almost completely absent from these debates are the voices of those who are most affected by the issues in question: students.

Hannah Nguyen: Lifelong Learner. Future Teacher.I am good at listening, singing, building, imagining, exploring, and getting super excited about education.

Full story…

Related:

Publicly Funded Schools That Are Allowed to Teach Creationism, Chris Kirk, Slate

  • Thousands of schools in states across the country can use taxpayer money to cast doubt on basic science.
  • The real sex ed: 11 sex tips experts wish they’d known sooner

NPR’s Education Coverage Funded By Pro-Privatization Billionaires

Media%20%26%20Technology%20Banner.jpg

  • Both NPR's State Impact and Michelle Rhee's StudentsFirst are funded by the Walton Family Foundation, which has been funneling over $100 million a year to various right-wing efforts to break teachers unions and privatize public education—and that includes both NPR and StudentsFirst.
  • After pledging transparency, PBS hides details of new deal with billionaire owner of NewsHour

S.H.A.M.E. 

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/If you like reading this article, consider joining the crew of all reader-supported Evergreene Digest by contributing the equivalent of a cafe latte a month--using the donation button above—so we can bring you more just like it.

/npr-walmart.pngMay 9, 2013 | Remember Ally Bank's conflicted funding of NPR financial news program Planet Money? Well, turns out NPR is much more compromised than we ever imagined. Even its coverage of education issues is rife with biased reporting and undisclosed conflicts of interest that tie NPR to some of the most powerful pro-school privatization interests in the country.

Yasha Levine reports for NSFWCORP:

Consider a new NPR local news project called State Impact, which NPR describes as a "local-national collaboration between NPR and station groups in eight states that reports on state government actions and their impact on citizens and communities."

In January, State Impact published an interview with Greg Harris, the Ohio director of Michelle Rhee's pro-charter school astroturf group StudentsFirst to promote a "report card" that the group released rating Ohio's state education policies. . . .

Yasha Levine is an investigative journalist and a founding editor of The eXiled Online. She is currently a roving reporter at Glenn Greenwald's Pando Daily.

Full story…

Related:

After pledging transparency, PBS hides details of new deal with billionaire owner of NewsHour, David Sirota, Pando Daily 

  • The major difference this time is that this new story of secrecy isn’t about who funds the journalism on the NewsHour. It is about who actually owns the NewsHour.
  • Officials refuse to provide evidence of guarantees for editorial independence.
  • Revealing the secret corruption inside PBS’s news division
  • What DC Won't See Tonight on Public TV

Beyond Neoliberal Miseducation

  • Universities are increasingly becoming dead zones of the imagination, managed by a class of swelling bureaucrats, inhabited by faculty who constitute a new class of indentured, if not sometime willing, technicians and students who are demeaned as customers and saddled with crippling debts.
  • Higher education is being defunded as part of a larger scheme to dismantle and privatize all public services, goods and spheres.
  • 6 ways neoliberal education reform is destroying our college system

Henry Giroux, Moyers & Company

Coffee%20%26%20Paper%20Graphic.jpg Journalism with real independence and integrity is a rare thing. All reader supported Evergreene Digest relies on reader donations. Click on the donation button above to make a contribution and support our work.

2013_0617StudentLoans_Original.jpgMoyers & Company Editor's Note: This post originally appeared at Truthout. It draws from a number of ideas in Henry A. Giroux’s newest book, Neoliberalism’s War on Higher Education.

March 20, 2014 | As universities turn toward corporate management models, they increasingly use and exploit cheap faculty labor while expanding the ranks of their managerial class. Modeled after a savage neoliberal value system in which wealth and power are redistributed upward, a market-oriented class of managers largely has taken over the governing structures of most institutions of higher education in the United States. As Debra Leigh Scott points out, “administrators now outnumber faculty on every campus across the country.” [1] There is more at stake here than metrics. Benjamin Ginsberg views this shift in governance as the rise of what he calls ominously the “the all administrative university,” noting that it does not bode well for any notion of higher education as a democratic public sphere. [2]

Giroux%20cover-rc%2010_1.front_.lo_.jpg Henry A. Giroux currently holds the Global TV Network Chair Professorship at McMaster University in the English and Cultural Studies Department and a Distinguished Visiting Professorship at Ryerson University.

Full story…

Related:

6 ways neoliberal education reform is destroying our college system, Owen Davis, AlterNet

  • Higher ed is on the verge of falling victim to the same dangerous ideologies as K-12
  • Henry A. Giroux | When Schools Become Dead Zones of the Imagination
  • The Best and the Brightest Led America Off a Cliff

This Is What Happened When Scholastic Tried to Bring Pro-Coal Propaganda to School

Environment%20Banner.jpg

  • “The United States of Energy” was a colorful series of lessons on the advantages of coal, aimed at 4th-graders—and sponsored by Big Coal. Here’s how educators and activists worked together to get it out of classrooms.
  • 7 Most Absurd Things America's Kids Are Learning Thanks to the Conservative Gutting of Public Education

Bill Bigelow, Yes! Magazine

If you like reading this article, consider joining the crew of all reader-supported Evergreene Digest by contributing the equivalent of a cafe latte a month--using the donation button above—so we can bring you more just like it.

Illustration by Tancha/Shutterstock.

Mar 06, 2014 | While developing activities on coal and the climate crisis in 2011 for Rethinking Schools magazine, I ran across a curriculum, The United States of Energy, from Scholastic, the venerable education publisher.

It was a colorful series of lessons, aimed at fourth-graders, which explored the various sources for energy in the United States. The material on coal discussed its many “advantages.” But when I looked for discussion of the disadvantages … nothing.

Not a word about coal’s status as the largest source of climate-wrecking carbon dioxide. Nothing about how burning coal emits toxic mercury, or how mountaintop removal mining has destroyed 500 Appalachian mountains.

Bill Bigelow taught high school for 30 years. He is the curriculum editor of Rethinking Schools magazine. He is co-editor of A People’s Curriculum for the Earth, which will be published later this year.

Full story…

Related:

7 Most Absurd Things America's Kids Are Learning Thanks to the Conservative Gutting of Public Education, Katie Halper, AlterNet

  • Kids learn that gun control is a gateway to tyranny and that science is unchristian.
  • Publicly Funded Schools That Are Allowed to Teach Creationism

Pages