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Education and low-wage jobs: Time to change the narrative

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  • Rather than asking individuals to increase their value, we need to transform how we as a society value the work individuals do and how we remunerate the vital contributions of workers, especially those in low-wage jobs, which make our collective lives possible.
  • How to Create Policies to Address Income Inequality? De-Mythologize Upward Mobility

Tim Libretti, PoliticusUSA 

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yosoyunamujer520x3.jpgPhoto: Fast Food Forward Facebook page.

Tuesday, September, 9th, 2014 | Rather than asking individuals to increase their value, we need to transform how we as a society value the work individuals do.

Recently when President Obama admonished corporate CEOs to stop complaining about regulations, he roused a sharp retort from the corporate world, accusing him of "not getting it" and not doing enough to remove uncertainties caused by regulations that discourage companies from hiring. While his remarks were arguably nothing more than a gentle yet scolding reminder that corporations have fared quite well coming out of the recession in comparison to the proverbial "ordinary people" of Main Street, the intensity of corporate blowback underscores just how difficult any political struggle will be to orchestrate meaningful redistribution of resources to address the wealth gap, whether it be through governmental efforts to raise the minimum wage or labor actions such as those in recent months by fast food workers around the nation.

Tim LibrettiEnglish Dept Chair, at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago, Illinois

Students Protesting Conservative Rewrite Of History Get Their Most Important Endorsement Yet

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"These students recognize that the social order can -- and sometimes must -- be disrupted in the pursuit of liberty and justice. Civil disorder and social strife are at the patriotic heart of American history -- from the Boston Tea Party to the American Revolution to the Civil Rights Movement. And these events and ideas are essential within the study of a college-level, AP U.S. History course." --The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program

Matt Ferner, Huffington Post

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n-JEFFERSON-COUNTY-large570.jpg Students from Chatfield and Dakota Ridge high schools on Wednesday protest a school board proposal to rewrite an AP history class. | RJ Sangosti via Getty Images

09/26/2014 | The organization that oversees the Advanced Placement curriculum, whose history course is being defended by massive, ongoing student protests in a Denver suburb, has now said that it backs those protests.

"The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program supports the actions taken by students in Jefferson County, Colorado, to protest a school board member’s request to censor aspects of the AP U.S. History course," said a statement from the College Board released on Friday.

Matt Ferner is a national reporter for the Huffington Post. He was previously the editor of HuffPost Denver.

Full story …

Robert Reich: Harvard Business School is complicit in America’s widening inequality

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  • It would seem worthwhile for the faculty and students of Harvard Business School, as well as those at every other major business school in America, to … ask whether maximizing shareholder value … continues to be the proper goal for the modern corporation.
  • The former secretary of labor calls out the famed university for the way it's educating our country's future CEOs.
  • What's Wrong With the American University System

Robert B. Reich, RobertReich.org

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No institution is more responsible for educating the CEOs of American corporations than Harvard Business School – inculcating in them a set of ideas and principles that have resulted in a pay gap between CEOs and ordinary workers that’s gone from 20-to-1 fifty years ago to almost 300-to-1 today.

survey, released on September 6, of 1,947 Harvard Business School alumni showed them far more hopeful about the future competitiveness of American firms than about the future of American workers.

Robert B. Reich, Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley and Senior Fellow at the Blum Center for Developing Economies, was Secretary of Labor in the Clinton administration. Time Magazine named him one of the ten most effective cabinet secretaries of the twentieth century. 

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Related:

What's Wrong With the American University System, Jennie Rothenberg Gritz, TheAtlantic.com

  • The Best and the Brightest Led America Off a Cliff
  • Higher ed should aspire to higher purpose
  • Teaching to Student's, Not Industry's, Needs

Why I hate standardized tests

  • Thanks to tests, my students' minds have been downsized -- while corporate interests profit. Here's the answer.
  • A teacher’s take on how to save public education
  • Salon Q&A: William Deresiewicz on millennials, the meritocracy, student loans and what's wrong with the Ivy League 

Robert Hach, Salon

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/standardized_test.jpg(Credit: Eric Von Seggern via Shutterstock)

Saturday, Sep 13, 2014 | In recent years, I have begun each semester by asking my first-year composition students two questions, one theoretical and the other practical. First, the theoretical question: What is the purpose of testing? Then the practical question: What happens to the information they study for a test after students have taken the test. My students’ answers to both questions typically achieve virtual unanimity. The purpose of testing, they say, is to find out how much students have “learned,” which is to say, how much they “know.” After they take the test, these same students testify, they forget virtually all of the information they “learned” for the test.

In the subsequent discussion, I ask them what their answers to these questions suggest about their experience in the public school system (only a tiny minority of Miami Dade College students having attended private schools). Did the tests they took achieve the purpose of revealing how much they had learned, how much they know, about the subjects on which they were tested? If they passed those tests (as they must have in that they had been allowed to continue their education) and yet had forgotten the information about the subjects on which they were tested, can they legitimately say that they “learned” that information, and as a result, that they now “know” it? And if they didn’t learn it and, as a result, don’t know it, what was the outcome of their public education?

Robert Hach: Associate Professor Senior English Department, Miami Dade College (FL)

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Related:

Salon Q&A: William Deresiewicz on millennials, the meritocracy, student loans and what's wrong with the Ivy League, Michael Schulson, Salon

  • “They are intellectually underpowered and full of themselves, because they’ve been told their whole life how wonderful they are.” --William Deresiewicz
  • The Best and the Brightest Led America Off a Cliff
  • How to Murder the Minds of the Masses

 

Salon Q&A: William Deresiewicz on millennials, the meritocracy, student loans and what's wrong with the Ivy League

  • “They are intellectually underpowered and full of themselves, because they’ve been told their whole life how wonderful they are.” --William Deresiewicz
  • The Best and the Brightest Led America Off a Cliff
  • How to Murder the Minds of the Masses

Michael Schulson, Salon

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media.salon.com/2013/09/ivy_leaguers-620x412.jpg(Credit: AP/Jessica Hill)

Tuesday, Sep 2, 2014 | In the spring of 2008, William Deresiewicz taught his last class at Yale. In the summer of 2008, he published an essay explaining how an Ivy League education had messed up his life, and the lives of his students.

Elite schools, Deresiewicz argued, give their students an inflated sense of self-worth. They reward perfectionism and punish rebelliousness. They funnel timid students into a handful of jobs, mostly in consulting and investment banking (and now Teach for America). For a real education, he went on to suggest, you might want to head to one of the wonkier liberal arts colleges, or to a state school.

William Deresiewicz is an American author, essayist, and literary critic. His All Points blog appears each Monday on the American Scholar website.

Michael Schulson is a freelance writer based in Durham, North Carolina. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Yale.

Full story … 

Related:

The Best and the Brightest Led America Off a Cliff, Chris Hedges, Truthdig

Don’t expect them to save us. They don’t know how. And when it all collapses, when our rotten financial system with its trillions in worthless assets implodes and our imperial wars end in humiliation and defeat, they will be exposed as being as helpless, and as stupid, as the rest of us.

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How to Murder the Minds of the Masses, John Taylor Gotto, The Arcane Front

Most of us let our own fears or the impositions of others imprison us in a world of low expectations.

 

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