You are here

Youth & Education

Education Logo

Jeff Danziger | Educational Tidal Wave Made in China / Slate.com

Section(s): 

Forty Percent of Parents Say Bad Economy Has Affected Child Care

in the NIEER Online Newsletter

\r\n

A survey just out from the National Association of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies (NACCRA) shows that many families are still struggling. About 40 percent of parents say the current economy has affected their child care arrangements and they worry about not being able to meet their household expenses. Nearly three-quarters of parents said they support investing more government money in improving quality of care even if it means they would pay more in taxes. The report also shows parents' perceptions about laws, standards, and oversight far exceed actual levels of oversight by federal and state agencies.

\r\n

More ...

Section(s): 

For Whom Does the Bell Toll?

It’s Time We Heed The Words of John Donne

\r\n

Preschool Matters...Today

\r\n

The latest Census Bureau data (collected in 2009 and early this year) show the gap between rich and poor in the U.S. is the widest on record. Last year, the top 20 percent of households—those earning more than $100,000 a year—received 49.4 percent of all household income. The bottom 20 percent—those earning less than $20,000—received 3.4 percent. The ratio of earnings between the top and bottom is about double what it was when the Census Bureau began tracking in 1967. Median household income fell 2.9 percent nationwide, from $51,726 to $50,221. It rose in only one state — North Dakota. Now 43.6 million Americans are living in poverty, the most in the 51 years the Census estimates have been published.

\r\n

Alarming as they are, these numbers are but the latest installment in a decades-long trend in which expanding income inequality was driven more by growth in income for those at the top than declines for those in the middle or at the bottom. That has clearly changed as middle- and lower- income families have lost ground.

\r\n

More...

Section(s): 

Detroit teacher ejects student for anti-gay remarks

    \r\n
  • In return, the teacher was kicked out of Howell High School in Michigan for a day — suspended without pay for violating the student's free speech rights.
  • \r\n

  • Support Jay McDowell
  • \r\n

\r\n

Jeff Karoub, Associated Press/Google

High school economics teacher Jay McDowell says he didn't like where the discussion was going after a student told his classmates he didn't "accept gays," so McDowell kicked the boy out of class for a day.
In return, the teacher was kicked out of Howell High School in Michigan for a day — suspended without pay for violating the student's free speech rights.

\r\n

The incident has sparked intense debate in Howell, about 45 miles (72 kilometers) northwest of Detroit, over defending civil rights without trampling the U.S. constitution's right to free speech. It's gained far wider attention since a local newspaper released video of a 14-year-old gay student from another city defending McDowell at a Howell school board meeting.

\r\n

More...

\r\n

Related:

\r\n

Support Jay McDowell

Section(s): 

Time for Schools to Stop Damaging Children

Our schools are turning millions of normal children into dropouts and failures. This isn't because of a few bad teachers or principals, but because the natural learning behaviors of children are routinely penalized instead of praised.

Ruth Bettelheim, Ph.D., Huffington Post

If you like reading this article, consider contributing a cuppa jove to Evergreene Digest--using the donation button in the above right-hand corner—so we can bring you more just like it.

Our schools are turning millions of normal children into dropouts and failures. This isn't because of a few bad teachers or principals, but because the natural learning behaviors of children are routinely penalized instead of praised. Initiatives like "No Child Left Behind" and "The Race To The Top" won't change this, because they don't adequately take into account research about how children learn. As Nobel prize-winning neuroscientist Eric Kandel says, children have "enormous capability that they're born with and often school takes it out of them."

\r\n

Our classrooms are based on outdated ideas, functioning like mid-20th century factories. Each child is offered an identical curriculum, like a car moving along an assembly line. However, children aren't units of production and this approach is failing. Since 1970, the rate of high school graduation has declined, and the United States has fallen from first to twelfth among developed nations in education.

\r\n

More...

Section(s): 

Pages