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Arend van Dam | WikiLeaks against US Army / CagleCartoons.com

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The WikiLeaks Cables And U.S. Foreign Policy

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WikiLeaks' Julian Assange insisted that his website was "an organization that tries to make the world more civil and act against abusive organizations that are pushing it in the opposite direction."

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The Progress Report, Think Progress

Since last weekend (Nov 27-28), the international organization WikiLeaks has been releasing a trove of a quarter-million confidential American diplomatic cables, some dating back as early as 1979. This is the third such document release by the organization. The first, in July, contained 77,000 documents relating to over seven years of the U.S.-led coalition's war in Afghanistan. The second, in October, contained some 390,000 documents from the Iraq war.

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The latest documents cover a broad range of issues, from U.S. attempts to find host countries for Guantanamo detainees, to U.S. officials' concern over both Afghan and Pakistani allies' commitment and ability to fight extremism, as well as very candid appraisals of the leaders of U.S. allies such as France,  Russia, Canada, and Turkey. Commenting on Monday, Secretary of State Clinton called the release of documents "not just an attack on America's foreign policy interests," but "an attack on the international community -- the alliances and partnerships, the conversations and negotiations that safeguard global security and advance economic prosperity." However, British historian Timothy Garton Ash writes, "[M]y personal opinion of the State Department has gone up several notches," noting that the analysis found in the cables "is often first rate."

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Related:

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Special Report | Wikileaks, David Culver, Evergreene Digest, ed.

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  • WikiLeaks Cables Reveal "Profound Hatred for Democracy on the Part of Our Political Leadership"
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  • Wikileaks Exposes Complicity of the Press
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The Charade of Israeli-Palestinian Talks

Washington’s pathetic capitulation to Israel while pleading for a meaningless three-month freeze on settlement expansion – excluding Arab East Jerusalem – should go down as one of the most humiliating moments in U.S. diplomatic history.

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Noam Chomsky, truthout

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If you like reading this article, consider contributing a cuppa jove to Evergreene Digest--using the donation button in the above right-hand corner—so we can bring you more just like it.

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President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, left, and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel leave through the doorway in the Cabinet Room of the White House, as the president walks the prime minister to his car following their meetings, July 6, 2010. (Photo: Pete Souza / Official White House Photo)

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Washington’s pathetic capitulation to Israel while pleading for a meaningless three-month freeze on settlement expansion – excluding Arab East Jerusalem – should go down as one of the most humiliating moments in U.S. diplomatic history.

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In September the last settlement freeze ended, leading the Palestinians to cease direct talks with Israel. Now the Obama administration, desperate to lure Israel into a new freeze and thus revive the talks, is grasping at invisible straws – and lavishing gifts on a far-right Israeli government.

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Special Report | Wikileaks

We should understand- and the Pentagon Papers is another case in point- that one of the major reasons for government secrecy is to protect the government from its own population.

5 Items including:

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  • WikiLeaks Cables Reveal "Profound Hatred for Democracy on the Part of Our Political Leadership"
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  • Wikileaks Exposes Complicity of the Press
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David Culver, Evergreene Digest, ed.

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John Deering

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Noam Chomsky: WikiLeaks Cables Reveal "Profound Hatred for Democracy on the Part of Our Political Leadership" Amy Goodman, Democracy Now!/Reader Supported News
We should understand- and the Pentagon Papers is another case in point- that one of the major reasons for government secrecy is to protect the government from its own population.

WikiLeaks Honduras: State Department Busted on Support of Coup, Robert Naiman, t r u t h o u t

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  • Why does this matter now?
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  • First, the constitutional and political crisis in Honduras is ongoing, and the failure of the US to take immediate, decisive action in response to the coup was a significant cause of the ongoing crisis.
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  • Second, the relationship of actual US policy - as opposed to rhetorical pronouncements - to democracy in the region is very much a live issue from Haiti to Bolivia.
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WikiLeaks Cable: White House Worked With GOP To Kill Bush Torture Probe, David Corn, Mother Jones
A WikiLeaks cable shows that when Spain considered a criminal case against ex-Bush officials, the Obama White House and Republicans got really bipartisan.

Wikileaks Exposes Complicity of the Press, Gareth Porter, CounterPunch
Documents Show New York Times and Washington Post Shilling for US Government on Iran Missile "Threat"

Murder Threats Rise Against WikiLeaks Founder, Tom Hayden, The Peace and Justice Resource Center

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  • Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Lydia Howell
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  • As embarrassing WikiLeaks documents continue being released to the mainstream media, the response from frustrated commentators ranges from “execute him” [Mike Huckabee, Fox] to “hunt him down like the Taliban” [Sarah Palin] to ignore him as “delusional” [Jeffrey Toobin, CNN]. In both cases, the dangers are real.
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WikiLeaks Honduras: State Department Busted on Support of Coup

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  • Why does this matter now?
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  • First, the constitutional and political crisis in Honduras is ongoing, and the failure of the US to take immediate, decisive action in response to the coup was a significant cause of the ongoing crisis.
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  • Second, the relationship of actual US policy - as opposed to rhetorical pronouncements - to democracy in the region is very much a live issue from Haiti to Bolivia.
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Robert Naiman, t r u t h o u t

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The streets of Honduras following a coup in July 2009. (Photo: codepinkhq)

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By July 24, 2009, the US government was totally clear about the basic facts of what took place in Honduras on June 28, 2009. The US embassy in Tegucigalpa sent a cable to Washington with the subject, "Open and Shut: The Case of the Honduran Coup," asserting that "there is no doubt" that the events of June 28 "constituted an illegal and unconstitutional coup." The embassy listed arguments being made by supporters of the coup to claim its legality, and dismissed them thus: "None ... has any substantive validity under the Honduran constitution." The Honduran military clearly had no legal authority to remove President Manuel Zelaya from office or from Honduras, the embassy said, and their action - the embassy described it as an "abduction" and "kidnapping" - was clearly unconstitutional.

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It is inconceivable that any top US official responsible for US policy in Honduras was not familiar with the contents of the July 24 cable, which summarized the assessment of the US embassy in Honduras on key facts that were politically disputed by supporters of the coup regime. The cable was addressed to Tom Shannon, then assistant secretary of state for western hemisphere affairs; Harold Koh, the State Department's legal adviser; and Dan Restrepo, senior director for western hemisphere affairs at the National Security Council. The cable was sent to the White House and to Secretary of State Clinton.

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