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Gender & Sexuality

Gender & Sexuality

Won't Someone Please Think of the Men?

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A backlash against abusive men in the workplace is in full swing, and men, the poor things, can’t handle it.

Erin Keane, Salon

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11.13.2017 | In the wake of the recent tidal wave of public allegations against Hollywood and media figures — a deluge unleashed initially by meticulous reporting http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Stop%20the%20War%20on%20Women%20graphic_1.jpgby Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey for The New York Times and Ronan Farrow for The New Yorker on the decades of abuse allegations made by what are now dozens of women against movie mogul Harvey Weinstein — men are looking over their shoulders. They feel the ground shifting under their feet. If untouchable comedy hero Louis C.K. can lose his career in two days, what could happen to poor anonymous me? they are asking.

To them I say, I don’t know, what do you think should happen? What reckoning do you, confused and frightened men of the world, personally fear, and why?

Erin Keane is Salon's managing editor.

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Sexual harassment, assault: Change the story

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Participants at the Women's March, Kansas City, Missouri, Jan. 21, 2016 (NCR photo/George Goss)

  • We're not far from the scary world of "The Handmaid's Tale," but we don't have to keep repeating the story. Men in power can demonstrate that women are equal. They can call other men to examine masculinity. They can accept that women and men both desire sex and can control their urges. We can talk about crimes of power and the crime of silence among those who hold it. We can change.
  • Related: From the Archives | Let’s Stop Referring to Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault as ‘Women’s Issues’

 

Mariam Williams, National Catholic Reporter

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http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Stop%20the%20War%20on%20Women%20graphic_1.jpgOct 28, 2017 | Lately my favorite way to add gray to my hair is to watch the show "The Handmaid's Tale" on Hulu. Based on the novel by Margaret Atwood, the story is set in a dystopian present in which the United States is a totalitarian nation, a fundamentalist interpretation of the Bible is law, and fertile women are forced to be surrogates for barren women. From what I can tell after seven episodes, all the barren women are married to wealthy men in positions of power. All the characters who aren't "commanders" or their wives are militia, servants or handmaids.

I watch it because a coworker recommended it, though she said it was scary. She didn't mean this in the seasonal, Halloween way. She meant "The Handmaid's Tale" is scary because it's so plausible.

Mariam Williams is a Kentucky writer living in Philadelphia. She holds a Master of Fine Arts degree in creative writing and certificate in public history from Rutgers University-Camden. She is a contributor to the anthology Faithfully Feminist.

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Related:

From the Archives | Let’s Stop Referring to Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault as ‘Women’s Issues’, Linda A. Seabrook and Quentin Walcott, Huffington Post

  • We all benefit when responsible men stand in their communities as shining examples of healthy and respectful masculinity.
  • Related: “Dear Kim. Please stop using the term ’empowerment’ when you really mean ‘marketing’.” 

 

http://i.huffpost.com/gen/4267860/images/n-GROUP-OF-MEN-628x314.jpg George Doyle via Getty Images 

04/28/2016 | From reproductive rights to paid family leave to sexual and domestic violence, our society neatly categorizes issues where women bear the brunt of the burden as “women’s issues,” turning them into problems for women and women’s rights advocates alone to solve. But this framing couldn’t be more wrong, and only serves to reinforce the practice of victim blaming that is so pervasive in our society.

As we close another Sexual Assault Awareness Month, we can’t help but wonder — where are the voices of the men? Yes, women are overwhelmingly victims of domestic violence, but men are overwhelmingly perpetrators. It comes down to male behavior and conditioning, so preventing and addressing violence requires men to be engaged in this issue, and take action as well. And breaking the cycle of violence starts with addressing how boys are conditioned to model “male” behavior and attitudes.

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Chris Brown’s actions are inexcusable, but what he says about male violence is vital.

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“Chris Brown: Welcome to My Life”(Credit: Gravitas Ventures)

Chris Brown’s new documentary is a reminder of how male violence can be taught and passed down.

Rachel Leah, Salon

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http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Stop%20the%20War%20on%20Women%20graphic_1.jpg10.20.2017 | Singer Chris Brown's documentary "Welcome to My Life," released via Netflix this month, is a retelling of his rise to fame and the controversy that mired it. It seems, even by its packaging, that it's a bid to complicate and add nuance to the unfavorable headlines and numerous courtroom dates that have defined Brown's career as much as his music has over the last eight years.

"I'm tired of giving people something to talk about," he says at the beginning of the film. "They should be talking about how I’m the baddest motherfucka onstage, instead of I'm the baddest motherfucka in the courtroom."

Rachel Leah is a culture writer for Salon, who also writes about race and criminal justice. She holds an MA in journalism and Africana studies from NYU.

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Related:

From the Archives | Let’s Stop Referring to Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault as ‘Women’s Issues’ , Linda A. Seabrook and Quentin Walcott, Huffington Post

• We all benefit when responsible men stand in their communities as shining examples of healthy and respectful masculinity.

• Related: “Dear Kim. Please stop using the term ’empowerment’ when you really mean ‘marketing’.” 

http://i.huffpost.com/gen/4267860/images/n-GROUP-OF-MEN-628x314.jpg04/28/2016 | From reproductive rights to paid family leave to sexual and domestic violence, our society neatly categorizes issues where women bear the brunt of the burden as “women’s issues,” turning them into problems for women and women’s rights advocates alone to solve. But this framing couldn’t be more wrong, and only serves to reinforce the practice of victim blaming that is so pervasive in our society.

As we close another Sexual Assault Awareness Month, we can’t help but wonder — where are the voices of the men? Yes, women are overwhelmingly victims of domestic violence, but men are overwhelmingly perpetrators. It comes down to male behavior and conditioning, so preventing and addressing violence requires men to be engaged in this issue, and take action as well. And breaking the cycle of violence starts with addressing how boys are conditioned to model “male” behavior and attitudes.

Full story … 

 

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Special Project | This Week in Patriarchy, Week Ending October 21, 2017

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  • Story 1: There's no denying our country's sickness now
  • Story 2: Harvey Weinstein And The End Of Open Secrets
  • Story 3: The Problem With Asking Women To Say ‘Me Too’
  • Story 4: Men and #metoo
  • Story 5: The ‘Casting Couch’ Euphemism Lets Us Pretend Hollywood’s All Right
  • Story 6: In 1956, a Fan Magazine Published a Four-Part Casting Couch Exposé. It Didn’t Go Well

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

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Story 1: There's no denying our country's sickness now, Jessica Valenti, The Guardian
7 October 2017 | A year after the Trump Access Hollywood tape, allegations of sexual harassment emerge – finally – against a leading film producer
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Story 2: Harvey Weinstein And The End Of Open Secrets, Jennifer Siebel Newsom, HuffPost
October 6, 2017 | I believe every word that was written in the New York Times, because very similar things happened to me.
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Story 3: The Problem With Asking Women To Say ‘Me Too’, Angelina Chapin, HuffPost
10/16/2017| Guys consider our bodies disposable. The pressure should be on men to stop predatory behavior.
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Story 4: Men and #metoo, Tom Ehrich, On the Road
October 20, 2017 | I see no safe way to navigate the minefield of male-female relations. Nor should there be a safe way.
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Story 5: The ‘Casting Couch’ Euphemism Lets Us Pretend Hollywood’s All Right, Claire Fallon, HuffPost
The phrase that gives us permission to ignore sexual harassment.
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Story 6: In 1956, a Fan Magazine Published a Four-Part Casting Couch Exposé. It Didn’t Go Well, Matthew Dessem, Slate

Building an industry and culture in which powerful men don’t feel women are theirs to threaten, cajole, intimidate, and harass will require us to skip the cultural amnesia this cycle.
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