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Gender & Sexuality

Kick Against the Pricks and Other Unsexy Truths About Sexual Harassment

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  • Part 1: The Unsexy Truth About Harassment
    • Sexual harassment is often understood, like other forms of gender-based violence, as a violation of consent. It is more than that.
  • Part 2: Kick Against the Pricks
    • Will men ever see women as full-fledged human beings rather than ego salves and receptacles?

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

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Part 1: The Unsexy Truth About Harassment

https://portside.org/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/field/image/ak_harassmentwork_12_13_17.jpg?itok=KwQ1ZBRBSexual harassment is often understood, like other forms of gender-based violence, as a violation of consent. It is more than that.

Melissa Gira Grant, The New York Review of Books / Portside 

December 8, 2017 | On both sides of my subway stop, an ad campaign for the local public radio station, WNYC, has rotated for a few months now. The ads use text message-like taglines: one about the station call letters being your safe word, and another that asks, “You up?” After this week, when two more WNYC hosts were suspended as of Wednesday and placed under investigation for “inappropriate conduct”—Leonard Lopate and Jonathan Schwartz, joining John Hockenberry, who we learned over the weekend was also accused of workplace harassment—the station’s ads now read like leaked transcripts of unwanted sexts.

That’s how I read them. My AIM window once used to light up with messages from my editors and other writers at all hours, though it was one editor who was responsible for most of the late-night notes. This is how I knew he was editing my stories in bed with his wife, and he wanted me to know that he enjoyed it. He told me repeatedly, treating me like I was a secret, though it was one of his own invention, and I was not a participant. I don’t have the messages. It was years ago. I can’t say the words upset me, not then, not now. What they left me with was doubt, a sharp jab coinciding with the moments of accomplishment that I should have been able to enjoy as a writer. To detach myself from that editor meant I had to look at my own work with distance and suspicion. Did it only merit attention because I had? The editor didn’t have to say anything more; I did this doubting to myself. Over time, I stopped.

http://melissagiragrant.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/melissa__bk_3664_v1-750x750.jpg Melissa Gira Grant  is a journalist and author, covering sexual politics, criminal justice, and human rights. She is a contributing writer for Pacific Standard and the Village Voice, and a writer in residence with the Fair Punishment Project (a joint initiative of Harvard Law School’s Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice and its Criminal Justice Institute).

Full story … 

Part 2: Kick Against the Pricks

http://cdn.nybooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/kipnis_1-122117.jpg Donald Trump with Allie LaForce (Miss Teen USA), Natalie Glebova (Miss Universe), and Chelsea Cooley (Miss USA) at a launch party for Cara Birnbaum’s book Universal Beauty: The Miss Universe Guide to Beauty, Trump Tower, New York City, April 2006 Gabriela Maj/Patrick McMullan/Getty Images

  • Be Fierce: Stop Harassment and Take Your Power Back ~ Gretchen Carlson
  • Will men ever see women as full-fledged human beings rather than ego salves and receptacles? Until that day, the accusations and exposés will continue: the floodgates have opened and aren’t closing anytime soon.

Laura Kipnis, The New York Review of Books

http://cdn.nybooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/kipnis_2-122117.jpg Gretchen Carlson shortly after she was crowned Miss America, September 1988  Michael Schwartz/New York Post Archives/Getty Images

December 21, 2017 | At first it was a lot of enormous media potentates crashing to earth, followed by a bunch of lesser despots and lords, many employed in the media industries too, and it soon expanded to include half the men in Hollywood and ancillary trades like politics. The accompanying din was the clamor of pundits (those who hadn’t yet been felled themselves) attempting to explain what had happened—then reexplain, then explain some more—because the picture kept changing: soon the not-so-powerful were under fire too (freelance writers and experimental novelists were among those anonymously charged in an online list), and it was becoming unclear whether it was “toxic masculinity” or masculine panic we were talking about.

But at the beginning, the story seemed plain enough. It turns out that in the tallest skyscrapers and plushest hotels of the most advanced economies, many high-profile men have been acting the part of feudal lords, demanding droit du seigneur from their vassals, the vassals in this case being their female employees and others wishing entry into their fiefdoms. Evidently there’s been a covert system of taxation on female advancement in the work world, with the unluckier among us obligated to render not just the usual fealty demanded by overweening bosses but varying degrees of sexual homage too, from ego-stroking and fluffing (which is gross enough), to being grabbed and groped, to the expectation of silence about full-on rape.

Laura Kipnis is a Professor in the Department of Radio, TV, and Film at Northwestern. Her books include How to Become a Scandal: Adventures in Bad Behavior and Unwanted Advances: Sexual Paranoia Comes to Campus. (December 2017)

Full story … 

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The Uncommon Conversation on Sex Abuse Needs to Move to the Next Level

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  • Part 1: 'Uncommon conversation' on sex abuse falls silent
    • An "uncommon conversation" is on hold in Minnesota.
  • Part 2: Leonard Pitts Jr.: What does it mean to be a man?
    • You see, Fox "News" has it exactly wrong. Men are not an endangered species. Real men are another matter.
  • Related: The Sexual Harassment Conversation Needs to Move to the Next Level

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

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Part 1: 'Uncommon conversation' on sex abuse falls silent

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Empty%20Chairs%20Arranged%20in%20a%20Circle.jpg(Dreamstime/Bernd Schmidt/NCR staff)

An "uncommon conversation" is on hold in Minnesota.

Brian Roewe, National Catholic Reporter (NCR) 

Jul 18, 2017 | After meeting a decade ago at a sex abuse treatment conference, Gil Gustafson and Susan Pavlak each came to see in their pasts a possible way forward for their home archdiocese, St. Paul-Minneapolis, as it struggled to deal with the scandal of clergy sexual abuse.

Pavlak, now 62, was sexually abused as a child by a teacher who was a former nun at a Catholic school. Gustafson, now 66, pleaded guilty in 1983 to sexually abusing a teenage boy, and has since admitted to abuse of three other male minors. By coming to know each other, each had grown personally. They wondered if they could duplicate that experience for other victims and abusers.

Brian Roewe is an National Catholioc Reporter (NCR) staff writer.

Full story … 





Part 2: Leonard Pitts Jr.: What does it mean to be a man?

You see, Fox "News" has it exactly wrong. Men are not an endangered species. Real men are another matter.

Leonard Pitts Jr. <>, Miami (FL) Herald / Tampa Bay (FL) Times

November 26, 2017 | So I guess you can take men off the endangered species list.

It wasn’t that long ago we were hearing that men were in trouble. It was said that our manly maleness was under siege from a culture of runaway political correctness hellbent on snipping off our masculine accoutrements and turning us into sissified wimps who ate kale, clipped coupons and talked about our feelings. Fox "News" sounded the alarm about what it dubbed the "feminization" of the American man.

Leonard Pitts Jr. is an American commentator, journalist and novelist. He is a nationally syndicated columnist and winner of the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary.

Full story … 

Related:

The Sexual Harassment Conversation Needs to Move to the Next Level, Katrina vanden Heuvel, the Nation

https://www.thenation.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/believe-women-march-ap-img.jpg?scale=896&compress=80Participants march against sexual assault and harassment at the #MeToo March in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles, November 12, 2017. (AP Photo / Damian Dovarganes)

  • What’s needed are real structural and legal changes to support the victims and curb the predators.
  • Related: What We Lose When We Let Predatory Men Shape The National Conversation

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No Justice!  No Peace!  Please share this post.

The Sexual Harassment Conversation Needs to Move to the Next Level

 

https://www.thenation.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/believe-women-march-ap-img.jpg?scale=896&compress=80

Participants march against sexual assault and harassment at the #MeToo March in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles, November 12, 2017. (AP Photo / Damian Dovarganes)

  • What’s needed are real structural and legal changes to support the victims and curb the predators.
  • Related: What We Lose When We Let Predatory Men Shape The National Conversation

Katrina vanden Heuvel, the Nation

November 28, 2017 | Women are forcing a long-overdue reckoning on sexual harassment. The list of ousted executives and politicians keeps growing. The thousands of reports of sexual harassment on #MeToo keep coming. More women are emboldened to talk, and more are being heard. The risks for abusers—particularly public figures—are rising. We know the roots of this extraordinary moment; where the moment leads remains to be seen.

The reckoning is part of the fierce reaction to Donald Trump’s election victory in 2016. Trump won in spite of the ultimate “October surprise,” when the Access Hollywood tape confirmed what more than a dozen women had alleged: Trump is a serial sexual predator, admitting on tape that, “when you’re a star, they let you do it. You can do anything. ... Grab them by the p—-y. You can do anything.”

A president is the nation’s great teacher. Women were not about to allow him to teach that lesson.

Katrina vanden Heuvel is editor and publisher of The Nation.

Full story … 

Related:

What We Lose When We Let Predatory Men Shape The National Conversation, Emma Gray, HuffPost

  • http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Matt%20Lauer%20Leaves%20Rockefeller%20Center.jpg Matt Lauer’s 20-year position at NBC allowed him to frame the way stories about powerful women and Very Bad Men were told — and not told.
  • It is a disturbing thought experiment to look at the media men who have faced allegations of sexual misconduct over the past two months and consider what stories might have been told had women been in their places.
  • Related: Trump Is Quietly Making It Even Harder To Report Sexual Harassment And Discrimination

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What We Lose When We Let Predatory Men Shape The National Conversation

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Matt%20Lauer%20Leaves%20Rockefeller%20Center.jpg

Matt Lauer’s 20-year position at NBC allowed him to frame the way stories about powerful women and Very Bad Men were told — and not told.

  • It is a disturbing thought experiment to look at the media men who have faced allegations of sexual misconduct over the past two months and consider what stories might have been told had women been in their places.
  • Related: Trump Is Quietly Making It Even Harder To Report Sexual Harassment And Discrimination

Emma Gray, HuffPost

  http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Have%20You%20No%20Shame%20with%2011%20Yr%20Banner%20alt.jpgA Culture Built On Free Service

What started out as an information service based on public support has now become a culture of free service. The process is absolutely being abused. A budget is required. Not a huge budget, but a “reasonable” one.

We’ll press the case until we get that.

David Culver, Founder, Publisher
Evergreene Digest

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11/29/2017 | In September 2016, Matt Lauer came under fire for his treatment of then–presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at the NBC Commander in Chief Forum.

The format of the forum had Clinton answering questions for 30 minutes, followed by Donald Trump doing the same. During Clinton’s turn, Lauer focused one-third of that time on seemingly prepared questions about her private email server. He asked tough follow-up questions, and interrupted her answers more than once. By the time a veteran in the audience could ask Clinton a specific question about how she would deploy troops to combat ISIS ― the type of inquiry that would allow her to show Americans her understanding of foreign policy and her concrete plans should she become Commander in Chief ― Lauer cut in before she could answer, asking that her response be delivered “as briefly as you can.”

https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/5570a9431300001700214f52.jpg?ops=100_100 Emma Gray is the Executive Women's Editor at HuffPost. She is also the co-host of the "Bachelor"-themed podcast, "Here To Make Friends," which was named a "must-listen" by The Daily Dot, and has appeared as an expert on the Today Show, Good Morning America, The Insider and Entertainment Tonight.

Full story … 

Related:

Trump Is Quietly Making It Even Harder To Report Sexual Harassment And Discrimination, Emily Peck, Huffington Post

https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/5a15b933150000bb348597be.jpeg?ops=scalefit_720_noupscale Members of the National Organization for Women hold a rally to call upon Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. to reopen a criminal investigation against Harvey Weinstein. Brendan McDermid / Reuters

  • The White House has been trying to shut women up this whole time.
  • Related: Actresses—and Millions of Other Workers—Have No Federal Sexual-Harassment Protections

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