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Series | 2014 Mid-term Election Guide, Part 8: Ralph Nader explains how voting for the ‘least worst’ candidate corrupts democracy

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  • You’re desperately supporting the least worst candidate because the other guy is worse. So you lose your bargaining power, and they don’t have to give you the time of day the minute you indicate you’re a least worst voter.
  • The left has lost its nerve and its direction.
  • Yes, I’m Voting Third Party. No I’m Not Wasting My Vote.

Eric W. Dolan, Raw Story

Evergreene Digest Editor's Note: To help our readers vote responsibly we are re-publishing as a stand-alone series those articles we think will help. These articles will appear frequently between now and the November 4 election. Watch for them in the Government & Politics section <http://evergreenedigest.org/government> (and simultaneously in other sections) under the searchable title "2014 Mid-term Election Guide".

Vote.jpgMonday, March 25, 2013 | Consumer advocate Ralph Nader on Monday decried the lack of choices at the ballot box and predicted super rich candidates would run in 2016.

Speaking on C-SPAN, Nader said the influence of money on the political process along with the weakening of unions had prevented candidates from addressing certain controversial issues. Voting for the lesser of two evils had also allowed candidates to skirt around particular topics.

“As voters, we get too satisfied with least worst choices, so we’ll vote for the Democrats because we think the Republicans are worse, or we’ll vote for the Republicans because we think the Democrats are worse,” he explained. “And every four years both of them get worse, because if you’re a least worst voter you don’t pull the least worst candidate. You’re desperately supporting the least worst candidate because the other guy is worse. So you lose your bargaining power, and they don’t have to give you the time of day the minute you indicate you’re a least worst voter.” 

Eric W. Dolan has served as an editor for Raw Story since August 2010, and is based out of San Diego, California. Eric is also the publisher and editor of PsyPost.

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Previously in the 2014 Mid-term Election Guide:

 

Series | 2014 Mid-term Election Guide, Part 7: The Democrats’ New Fake Populism

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It’s doubtful that many people have been fooled by the “left turn” of the Democratic Party. But on a deeper level the politics of “lesser evilism” still haunts labor and community groups, and keeping these groups within the orbit of the Democratic Party is the ultimate purpose of this new, more radical speechifying. Until these groups organize themselves independently and create their own working class political party, the above politics of “populist” farce is guaranteed to continue. 

Shamus Cooke, Workers Action

Evergreene Digest Editor's Note: To help our readers vote responsibly we are re-publishing as a stand-alone series those articles we think will help. These articles will appear frequently between now and the November 4 election. Watch for them in the Government & Politics section (and simultaneously in other sections) under the searchable title "2014 Mid-term Election Guide".

LoLlamanDemocracia.jpgMay 30, 2014 | It would have been hilarious were it not so nauseating. One could only watch the “New Populism” conference with pity-induced discomfort, as stale Democratic politicians did their awkward best to adjust themselves to the fad of “populism.”

A boring litany of Democratic politicians — or those closely associated — gave bland speeches that aroused little enthusiasm among a very friendly audience of Washington D.C. politicos. It felt like an amateur recital in front of family and friends, in the hopes that practicing populism with an audience would better prepare them for the real thing.

Shamus Cooke is a social service worker, trade unionist, and writer for Workers Action.

Full story… 

Previously in the 2014 Mid-term Election Guide:

 

The progressives are coming!

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  • What really terrifies Center-right Democrats is the realization that their brain-dead centrism finally faces a robust challenge -- and that has them terrified.
  • Why the latest attempt to “save” Democrats from populism is so pathetic
  • Series | 2014 Mid-term Election Guide, Part 6: Has the Left Surrendered?

Luke Brinker, Salon

elizabeth_warren_frank.jpgElizabeth Warren (Credit: AP/Charles Dharapak)

Friday, Oct 10, 2014 | Last December, Jon Cowan and Jim Kessler of the Wall Street-funded think tank Third Way penned a widely-discussed op-ed for the Wall Street Journal warning Democrats of the perils of economic populism, which Cowan and Kessler called a “dead end” for the party. The piece lambasted prominent progressives like Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, asserting that their focus on income inequality and their unwillingness to back savage cuts to social insurance programs was both irresponsible and politically foolish.

The piece triggered a fierce backlash against Third Way, and even two co-chairs of the organization disavowed Cowan and Kessler’s anti-populist screed. But the plutocratic wing of the Democratic Party hasn’t breathed its last, and the latest centrist attack on progressive populism is a real doozy.

Luke Brinker is Salon's deputy politics editor. 

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Series | 2014 Mid-term Election Guide, Part 6: Has the Left Surrendered? Richard Eskow, LA Progressive

  • An independent left must never plead with Democratic leaders to be heard, as too many liberals have been wont to do. That way lies continued irrelevance – and continued contempt. The future left must be willing to say “no” to … Democrats, with all that the word “no” implies.
  • Chris Hedges | The Left Has Lost Its Nerve and Its Direction

 

Noam Chomsky | Pope Francis, Oscar Romero and the horror of Reagan foreign policy

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  • Chomsky decries awful silence over the murder of bishop Oscar Romero, as Pope Francis speeds journey to sainthood
  • Washington’s legacy of destruction in Latin America, sadly, is still news to many north of the Rio Grande.
  • Overthrowing Other People’s Governments

Emanual Stoakes, Salon

Thanks to Evergreene Digest reader Stephen Gates for this contribution.

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shutterstock_125767211-620x412.jpgNoam Chomsky (Credit: fotostory via Shutterstock)

Friday, Sep 5, 2014 | Last month an apparently unremarkable series of reports about Pope Francis drifted through the international news carousel, attracting little attention from the national media — though it should have. They recorded the pontiff’s desire to expedite a deceased bishop’s journey toward prospective sainthood in accordance with the customs of the faith.

The cleric in question was Oscar Romero who, prior to his murder in 1980 by local death squads, held one of the most senior positions in the Catholic church of El Salvador. As some of the coverage mentioned in passing, he was killed not long after after having written to President Carter, appealing to him to halt his support for repressive government forces that were tearing the country apart in their assault on mass movements that opposed their undemocratic rule. Carter never replied; Romero was shot at mass.

Noam Chomsky is an American linguist, philosopher, cognitive scientist, logician, political commentator and activist. He is perhaps best known as a critic of all forms of social control and a relentless advocate for community-centered approaches to democracy and freedom. Over the last several decades, Chomsky has championed a wide range of dissident actions, organizations and social movements.

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Related:

Overthrowing Other People’s Governments, William Blum, Global Research 

  • The Master List of U.S. “Regime Changes”
  • “The Terrorists R Us”
  • Gary Kohls' Submission Notes on Overthrowing Other People’s Governments

 

Series | 2014 Mid-term Election Guide, Part 6: Has the Left Surrendered?

Politics%20Banner.jpg

  • An independent left must never plead with Democratic leaders to be heard, as too many liberals have been wont to do. That way lies continued irrelevance – and continued contempt. The future left must be willing to say “no” to … Democrats, with all that the word “no” implies.
  • Chris Hedges | The Left Has Lost Its Nerve and Its Direction

Richard Eskow, LA Progressive

Evergreene Digest Editor's Note: To help our readers vote responsibly we are re-publishing as a stand-alone series those articles we think will help. These articles will appear frequently between now and the November 4 election. Watch for them in the Government & Politics section <http://evergreenedigest.org/government> (and simultaneously in other sections) under the searchable title "2014 Mid-term Election Guide".

surrender.jpg Sunday, 2 March, 2014 | Has the American left ceased to exist as a viable political force by surrendering its power to a corporatized Democratic Party? That’s the argument put forward by political scientist Adolph Reed Jr., first in an essay for Harper’s magazine and then in a televised follow-up interview with Bill Moyers.

Reed’s essay, “Nothing Left: The Long, Slow Surrender of American Liberals,” has a blunt message which might be summarized as follows: The fault, dear liberals, lies not in our political stars, but in ourselves, that we are underlings. It’s not necessarily a new thought, but it packs a punch, especially as Reed has organized and expressed it.

Richard Eskow is a former executive with experience in health care, benefits, and risk management, finance, and information technology. He is a Senior Fellow with the Campaign for America's Future and hosts The Breakdown, which is broadcast on We Act Radio in Washington DC.

Full story…

Previously in the 2014 Mid-term Election Guide:

 

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