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Elizabeth Warren Finally Speaks on Israel/Gaza, Sounds Like Netanyahu

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Echoing Benjamin Nentayahu (and Hillary Clinton), Elizabeth Warren’s clear position is that Israel bears none of the blame for any of this. Or, to use her words, “when Hamas puts its rocket launchers next to hospitals, next to schools, they’re using their civilian population to protect their military assets. And I believe Israel has a right, at that point, to defend itself.” Such carnage is the “last thing Israel wants.” The last thing. That, ladies and gentlemen, is your inspiring left-wing icon of the Democratic Party.

Glenn Greenwald, The Intercept

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https://prod01-cdn06.cdn.firstlook.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/1/2014/08/187783454.jpgAug. 28 2014 | The last time Elizabeth Warren was asked about her views on the Israeli attack on Gaza – on July 17 – she, as Rania Khalek put it, “literally ran away” without answering. But last week, the liberal Senator appeared for one of her regularly scheduled “office hours” with her Massachusetts constituents, this one in Hyannis, and, as a local paper reported, she had nowhere to run.

One voter who identified himself as a Warren supporter, John Bangert, stood up and objected to her recent vote, in the middle of the horrific attack on Gaza, to send yet another $225 million of American taxpayer money to Israel for its “Iron Dome” system. Banger told his Senator: “We are disagreeing with Israel using their guns against innocents. It’s true in Ferguson, Missouri, and it’s true in Israel . . .  The vote was wrong, I believe.” To crowd applause, Bangert told Warren that the money “could have been spent on infrastructure or helping immigrants fleeing Central America.”

Glenn Greenwald is a journalist, constitutional lawyer, and author of four New York Times best-selling books on politics and law. His most recent book, No Place to Hide, is about the U.S. surveillance state and his experiences reporting on the Snowden documents around the world. 

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Unreasonable Men: Theodore Roosevelt and the Republican Rebels Who Created Progressive Politics ~ Michael Wolraich

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"As Michael Wolraich argues in his sharp, streamlined new book, Unreasonable Men, it was 'the greatest period of political change in American history.'" -Washington Post, 50 Notable Works of Nonfiction

Described in Good Reads

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https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51lnNl9eIRL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgSummer, 2016 | At the turn of the twentieth century, the Republican Party stood at the brink of an internal civil war. After a devastating financial crisis, furious voters sent a new breed of politician to Washington. These young Republican firebrands, led by "Fighting Bob" La Follette of Wisconsin, vowed to overthrow the party leaders and purge Wall Street's corrupting influence from Washington. Their opponents called them "radicals," and "fanatics." They called themselves Progressives.

President Theodore Roosevelt disapproved of La Follette's confrontational methods. Fearful of splitting the party, he compromised with the conservative House Speaker, "Uncle Joe" Cannon, to pass modest reforms. But as La Follette's crusade gathered momentum, the country polarized, and the middle ground melted away. Three years after the end of his presidency, Roosevelt embraced La Follette's militant tactics and went to war against the Republican establishment, bringing him face to face with his handpicked successor, William Taft. Their epic battle shattered the Republican Party and permanently realigned the electorate, dividing the country into two camps: Progressive and Conservative.

Michael Wolraich is a non-fiction writer in New York City, author of two books on politics and history, and freelance journalist.

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Political Lesser Evilism, Revisited

  • Do We Vote for the “Lesser of Two Evils” or to “Recapture the Revolutionary Spirit”?
  • “The future of the deep structural changes we seek will not be found in the decaying political machines.” 
  • Related: Series | 2014 Mid-term Election Guide, Part 8: Ralph Nader explains how voting for the ‘least worst’ candidate corrupts democracy

Richard Moser, Counterpunch

 

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http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Vote.jpgApril 8, 2016 | We have run out of safe places. The scale of our problems are far too great and they are far too dangerous and institutionalized. There is no clever, cunning or purely tactical way of addressing them. Inside baseball and palace politics have failed.

We are approaching a shift in the equation of risk. The dangers we face in making the big political changes are becoming less threatening than the dangers we face in continuing on the current course. Perhaps we are already there.

Richard Moser writes at Be Freedom, a website of movement strategy for activists and organizers, where this article first appeared.

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Related:

Series | 2014 Mid-term Election Guide, Part 8: Ralph Nader explains how voting for the ‘least worst’ candidate corrupts democracy, Eric W. Dolan, Raw Story

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  • You’re desperately supporting the least worst candidate because the other guy is worse. So you lose your bargaining power, and they don’t have to give you the time of day the minute you indicate you’re a least worst voter.
  • The left has lost its nerve and its direction.
  • Yes, I’m Voting Third Party. No I’m Not Wasting My Vote.

 

This Is Our Neoliberal Nightmare: Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump, and Why the Market and the Wealthy Win Every Time

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  • The rage driving our politics stems from cruelty of capitalism. So why do we vote for those who worship the market?
  • Related: Bernie Sanders is a socialist? Some on the far left say sellout is more like it

Anis Shivani, Salon / AlterNet

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June 8, 2016 | Over the last 15 years, editors often asked me not to mention the word “neoliberalism,” because I was told readers wouldn’t comprehend the “jargon.” This has begun to change recently, as the terminology has come into wider usage, though it remains shrouded in great mystery.

People throw the term around loosely, as they do with “fascism,” with the same confounding results. Imagine living under fascism or communism, or earlier, classical liberalism, and not being allowed to acknowledge that particular frame of reference to understand economic and social issues. Imagine living under Stalin and never using the communist framework but focusing only on personality clashes between his lieutenants, or likewise for Hitler or Mussolini or Mao or Franco and their ideological systems! But this curious silence, this looking away from ideology, is exactly what has been happening for a quarter century, since neoliberalism, already under way since the early 1970s, got turbocharged by the Democratic party under the Democratic Leadership Council (DLC) and Bill Clinton. We live under an ideology that has not been widely named or defined.

Anis Shivani is the author of several books of fiction, poetry, and criticism, including, most recently, My Tranquil War and Other Poems. His novel Karachi Raj (HarperCollins/Fourth Estate) was released this summer. His next book is the poetry collection Whatever Speaks on Behalf of Hashish, out in October.

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http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Bernie%20Sanders%20%26%20Eugene%20Debs_0.jpg Related:

Bernie Sanders is a socialist? Some on the far left say sellout is more like it, Evan Halper, Los Angeles (CA) Times

  • Not every leftist is enamored with Bernie Sanders. Some see him as a sellout.
  • Mimi Soltysik, presidential candidate for the Socialist Party USA, says of democratic socialist Bernie Sanders: "He has had a long history of support for war."
  • Related: Bernie Sanders supporters need to stop behaving like a cult

Special Report | The Panama Papers Scandal: A Man, A Plan, A Shell Account, Panama

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Panama Papers Show How Rich United States Clients Hid Millions Abroad

 

Eric Lipton and Julie Creswell, New York (NY) Times

 

 

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https://static01.nyt.com/images/2016/06/06/us/06panama1/06panama1-master768.jpg Panama City, Panama, home to the law firm Mossack Fonseca. A trove of the firm’s internal documents, known as the Panama Papers, have shaken the financial world.  Credit  Joe Raedle/Getty Images

June 5, 2016 | Over the years, William R. Ponsoldt had earned tens of millions of dollars building a string of successful companies. He had renovated apartment buildings in the New York City area. Bred Arabian horses. Run a yacht club in the Bahamas, a rock quarry in Michigan, an auto-parts company in Canada, even a multibillion-dollar hedge fund.

 

Now, as he neared retirement, Mr. Ponsoldt, of Jensen Beach, Fla., had a special request for Mossack Fonseca, a Panama-based law firm well placed in the world of offshore finance: How could he confidentially shift his money into overseas bank accounts and use them to buy real estate and move funds to his children?

Eric Lipton is a Washington-based correspondent for The New York Times, where he writes about government relations, corporate agendas and Congress; and 

Julie Creswell is a staff reporter for The New York Times, primarily writing features for the business section that follow the flow of money around private-equity firms, Wall Street banks, healthcare companies and real estate investments.

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