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An Extreme Makeover

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  • During the current campaign season, many Republican candidates have pushed to revive failed and unpopular policies from the GOP past, such as eliminating the Department of Education or privatizing Social Security.
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  • Disaster is just days away
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Progress Report, Think Progress

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During the current campaign season, many Republican candidates have pushed to revive failed and unpopular policies from the GOP past, such as eliminating the Department of Education or privatizing Social Security. "We need to get back to transferring many of the powers of the federal government to the states," said Alaska's Republican Senate nominee Joe Miller, calling for the abolition of Social Security as we know it. "I'd start by eliminating the U.S. Department of Education at a cost of $50 billion and then move on to Housing and Urban Development," said Utah Republican Senate nominee Mike Lee.

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Lee's call was echoed by Nevada's Republican Senate nominee Sharron Angle, who said, "I would like to go through to the elimination. I think we start by defunding it, and the reason that we should eliminate it is because its not the federal government's job to provide education for our children." And these newcomers to the national political stage may find many sympathetic ears in the incumbent Congress, as the GOP's shift to the right and embrace of the Tea Party has caused it to espouse an extreme anti-government zeal. These ideas -- and others becoming part of the mainstream right wing, like ending the 14th amendment's guarantee of birthright citizenship -- highlight the extreme policy positions that have come to define the modern-day conservative movement and the candidates that it has adopted.

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Related:

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Disaster is just days away, Paul Krugman, New York Times | NY

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  • Future historians will probably look back at the 2010 election as a catastrophe for America, one that condemned the nation to years of political chaos and economic weakness
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  • Divided we fail
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  • Eight False Things The Public “Knows” Prior To Election Day
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Disaster is just days away

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  • Future historians will probably look back at the 2010 election as a catastrophe for America, one that condemned the nation to years of political chaos and economic weakness
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  • Divided we fail
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  • Eight False Things The Public “Knows” Prior To Election Day
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Paul Krugman, New York Times | NY

If you like reading this article, consider contributing a cuppa jove to Evergreene Digest--using the donation button in the above right-hand corner—so we can bring you more just like it.

Future historians will probably look back at the 2010 election as a catastrophe for America, one that condemned the nation to years of political chaos and economic weakness control of at least one house of Congress next week. How worried should we be by that prospect?

Not very, say some pundits. After all, the last time Republicans controlled Congress while a Democrat lived in the White House was the period from the beginning of 1995 to the end of 2000. And people remember that era as a good time of rapid job creation and responsible budgets. Can we hope for a similar experience now?

No, we can't. This is going to be terrible. Future historians will probably look back at the 2010 election as a catastrophe for America, one that condemned the nation to years of political chaos and economic weakness.

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Related:

Eight False Things The Public “Knows” Prior To Election Day, Dave Johnson, Campaign for America's Future

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  • If the public votes in a new Congress that rejects the idea of helping to create demand in the economy because they think it didn't work, then the new Congress could do things that cause a depression.
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  • This stuff really matters.
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  • Five Things People "Know"
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  • People Are Allergic to the Facts
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Summary | Barack Obama, Change We Can Believe In: Week of October 31

5 New Items including:

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  • How Obama Lost the Narrative
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  • Obama Has Done 'Diddly Squat' For Gay Rights
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David Culver, ed., Evergreene Digest

If you like reading this article, consider contributing a cuppa jove to Evergreene Digest--using the donation button in the above right-hand corner—so we can bring you more just like it.

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Ted Rall

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Analysis of war docs shows some Iraqi detainees were handed back despite signs of torture, Raphael G. Satter and Paisley Dodds, Associated Press/Minneapolis Star Tribune | MN

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  • Field reports from the Iraq war published by WikiLeaks show that, despite Obama's public commitment to eschew torture, U.S. forces turned detainees over to Iraqi forces even after signs of abuse.
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  • Iraq war logs: These crimes were not secret, they were tolerated
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How Obama Lost the Narrative, David Corn, Mother Jones

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  • So he's not Superman after all--but how has he managed to lose the legion of doom?
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  • Here's one account.
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  • 2010 Elections: Why Have the Democrats Lost Popular Support?
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Obama Has Done 'Diddly Squat' For Gay Rights, Alan Cummings, Huffington Post

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  • "In a time when America is full of hatred of all kinds, but especially hatred towards young gay people, what message is the president sending when he repeatedly goes out of his way to spread the message that the gay population is not worthy of the respect that everyone else is?!"
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  • If Democratic candidates are counting on long-standing support from gay voters to help stave off big losses on Nov. 2, they could be in for a surprise.
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Officials Push to Bolster Law on Wiretapping, Charlie Savage, New York Times | NY

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  • Valerie E. Caproni, the F.B.I.’s general counsel, has said the government is trying to prevent its existing surveillance power from eroding.
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  • "Has the nation already gone past the tipping point to being a surveillance state? Probably not quite yet, but it won't be that much longer."
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  • Joseph Taylor, Suburban Maryland
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  • Obama's DOJ vs. the First Amendment
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Obama Signals Shift On Gay Marriage Support, Nick Wing, Huffington Post

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  • Obama (called) himself a "strong supporter of civil unions" who was uncomfortable getting behind legislation to broaden marriage rights for gay couples because of his "understandings of the traditional definitions of marriage."
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  • The president and his administration have taken their lumps from the gay rights community over the Justice Department's recently successful appeal of a federal court decision that had forced the military to halt its "don't ask, don't tell" policy.
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  • Full Transcript of Obama's Interview With Progressive Bloggers
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Attack on the Middle Class

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The Long Con
Attention tea partiers: The head you're putting on the chopping block may be your own.
By Monika Bauerlein and Clara Jeffery

Attack on the Middle Class!!
First they came after your paycheck. Then your house. What's next?
By James K. Galbraith

Will Obama Put Up a Fight?
How Obama lost control of the economic message.
By David Corn

Invasion of the Brain-Devouring Platitudes
Five election-year memes I never want to hear again. Ever.
By Kevin Drum

Adventures of Unemployed Man
Quick, free marketeers! Deploy the social safety net!
By Erich Origen and Gan Golan

Attack of the 50-Foot Palin<>
The B movie classic behind this issue's Mother Jones cover.
By Clara Jeffery and Monika Bauerlein

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How Obama Lost the Narrative

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  • So he's not Superman after all--but how has he managed to lose the legion of doom?
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  • Here's one account.
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  • 2010 Elections: Why Have the Democrats Lost Popular Support?
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David Corn, Mother Jones

If you like reading this article, consider contributing a cuppa jove to Evergreene Digest--using the donation button in the above right-hand corner—so we can bring you more just like it.

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Reprinted from The Adventures of Unemployed Man by Erich Origen and Gan Golan.

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On his first day back from summer vacation, President Obama appeared in a sweltering Rose Garden to talk about the economy. The latest numbers were disheartening—growth slow, consumer spending weak, housing sales down, unemployment near 10 percent. Obama reported that he'd just met with his economic team. He pointed out that his administration had already taken "a series of measures" to boost the economy, and that his aides were "hard at work" looking for more. He offered no specific proposals, and after five minutes he went back inside, taking no questions from the sweating reporters.

With the Democrats' poll numbers falling in tandem with the economic indicators, the best Obama could offer were a few modest proposals. At a moment when his party was facing a possibly catastrophic drubbing, the president appeared on the defensive, his economic leadership anemic. How had Obama lost his groove?

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Related:

2010 Elections: Why Have the Democrats Lost Popular Support?, Rabbi Michael Lerner, Tikkun.org

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  • What the Democrats Could Have Done
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  • Scaring Us To The Polls
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