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Health & Environment

Health, Science & Environment

Free screening of Troubled Waters and post-film forum

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Monday, October 25, 2010 7:00–9:00 p.m.
Parkway Theater, 4814 Chicago Ave., Minneapolis, MN

Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy

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Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Lydia Howell

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Troubled Waters is a documentary film that explores the unintended consequences of industrial agriculture and urban runoff on the health of the Mississippi River and the "Dead Zone" in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Afterward participate in a forum with staff from IATP, Friends of the Mississippi River, and the Land Stewardship Project.

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See the full event information and sign up for the waitlist.

Give us a cuppa jove...and we'll keep telling you the truth.

Four times a year we launch brief fundraising drives which have provided us with most of our annual budget. Can you help now with a small contribution? For the cost of a cuppa jove a month, we'll keep telling you the truth. Is it a deal?

Dear readers of Evergreene Digest,

When we launched Evergreene Digest 5 years ago our goal was ambitious for 2005:  to be the preferred one-stop on-line source for women, communities of color, working people, people with disabilities, veterans, youth, pacifists, GLBT, activists, spiritual seekers, progressives, environmentalists, youth, veterans, and other groups ignored by the mainstream media as legitimate audiences, sources, and subjects for the news.

We knew we wanted it to be free for our readers. And, we knew it would take a small staff of professionals to continually provide high-quality information 365-days a year.

Our bottom line dilemma: How would we fund it?

We could sell advertising. We could rely on big foundation grants. We could have corporate "co-sponsors". We could find a rich "sugar-mama or daddy." We could build a big email list and rent it to the highest bidders.

That would have been the easy, and inappropriate,  way.

But we decided to fund Evergreene Digest differently. Believing small is beautiful,  we seek thousands of small contributors, provide them with a high-quality product, and trust that the progressive community has our back as we move forward.

No catering to advertisers because we don't have any. No need to avoid controversial issues that could upset a few wealthy donors because we don't have any. No steering of our agenda to fit a foundation's funding priority because we don't have any.

And it's working! We've managed to build a small but very dedicated group of readers and supporters who have pitched in over the years in many ways to keep us afloat and support our work. Relying on small contributions from our readers not only guarantees us the independence to speak truth to power - but it helps keep us in touch - and on our toes - with our growing community of supporters.

Four times a year we launch brief fundraising drives which have provided us with most of our annual budget. Can you help now with a small contribution? For the cost of a cuppa jove a month, we'll keep telling you the truth. Is it a deal?

To make a secure, online donation with your PayPal account, click on the 'Donation' button in the upper right-hand corner, and follow the instructions.  Or, send a check through the mail, payable to “Evergreene Digest” c/o  David Culver, 460 5th Avenue North, #428, Hopkins, MN, 55343-7260.

Carl Sandburg once said: "Nothing happens unless first a dream." We know you share our dream of a more open, peaceful, just and progressive society. Of course it won't be easy but we believe we can make it happen - because we must!  And because 'necessity is the mother of invention', we believe that if we continue to work together, we will make our dreams a reality.

Please donate today and help bring the progressive dream to life. If you can't help financially, help by spreading the word about Evergreene Digest and/or contributing material for publication.

We can't do it without you. With a big thanks to small contributors,

Sincerely,

Dave & Crew

The Gulf Between Us

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  • Stories of terror and beauty from the world's largest accidental offshore oil disaster
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  • 6 months after oil spill, much remains unknown
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Terry Tempest Williams, Orion Magazine

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Photographs by J Henry Fair

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This is what we have been told:
•    April 20, 2010: the Macondo well blowout occurred approximately five thousand feet below the surface of the Gulf of Mexico, causing the BP-Transocean drilling platform Deepwater Horizon to explode, killing eleven workers and injuring seventeen others.   
•    5 million barrels of crude oil were released into the sea from the BP blowout. On average, sixty thousand barrels a day were escaping from the well before the gusher was capped on July 15, 2010.

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More...

Related:

6 months after oil spill, much remains unknown, Brian Skoloff and Harry R. Weber, Associated Press/Seacostonline.com

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  • It could be years before the spill's true effects are understood.
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  • Watch Crude Justice and hold BP accountable
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http://evergreenedigest.org/files/ED/Coffee & Paper_0.jpg If you liked reading this article, consider contributing a cuppa jove to Evergreene Digest--using the donation button above—so we can bring you more just like it.

Truth to Tell: Women's Cancer Action


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Women's Cancer Action (WCA) is focused on exploring the link between cancer and the environment, connecting those in need with support, and encouraging bold action to address the political, personal, and societal challenges of cancer prevention.

Andy Driscoll and Lynnell Mickelsen, Truth to Tell, KFAI-FM | MN

For years, we have known of the environment's assault on our breathing and other health issues, but not every neighborhood is afflicted with tar companies, toxic run-offs from factories old and new whose owners have ignored health concerns of employees and neighboring communities - more often than not, low wealth communities and people of color, depending on the state and locale - in the pursuit of cheaply earned profits. Minneapolis-St. Paul is ranked 5th for the greatest number of contaminated sites across the country (65,969 - one for every 48 people – plus 4,444 leaking storage tanks) with a mere 54 corrective action reports. We could go on about how the MPCA ignores the reality of polluting facilities, especially in this Metro Area.  It's enough to know that our air and groundwater, foods, drugs, etc., are likely killing us before our time.

But this is an even larger system issue our policymakers and regulators and health care providers, especially pharmaceutical corporations, fail to address adequately to protect our children as well as our adults and stop the record number of cancer cases growing out of these toxic cities.

Although breast cancer runs rampant through the ranks of women for any number of reasons, environmental catalysts are certainly a clear cause of the majority of them. What else could yield such an epidemic as women have experience over the last 40-50 years? Other cancers in both men and women, not to mention children’s leukemia cases, are decimating our ranks. These are preventable cancers.

Toxicity and contamination from negligent corporations is not limited to leaking tanks and  factories sites, power plants and farmlands. It can be found in our foods and cleaning products, our packaging and commercial operations at all retail levels, to mention but a few.

But few organizations have been successful in addressing those real causes, and why? Often co-opted by those corporations or needing to survive as institutions rather than working themselves out of jobs as cancer “preventers” and cure developers, they accept contributions from and come to rely on major corporate interests for their sustenance and, in the process, dispense with the soul of their existence. Has this happened with the pink movement? Some claim it has in the usurpation ofBreast Cancer Awareness Month.

Back in April, Women's Cancer Action, formerly Women's Cancer Resource Center, launched a non-profit organization and website, womenscanceraction.org, focused on cancer prevention and support. A new frontier in cancer resources and advocacy,WCA emerges uniquely grassroots and independent.

With the website as its communication and organizing hub, WCA is focused on exploring the link between cancer and the environment, connecting those in need with support, and encouraging bold action to address the political, personal, and societal challenges of cancer prevention.
Several women who have lived with cancer are the root of this movement and organization and are prepared to pour resources and energy into getting into the fight to install policies and processes to prevent cancer, especially in women, but anything done for women will surely ripple into all segments of the society.

TTT’s Andy Driscoll and Lynnell Mickelsen talk with the founders, supporters and professionals involved in Women’s Cancer Action and how and why they came into being in the midst of a plethora of other groups claiming to do the same.

Guests:

Barbara Wiener: Chair of the Board, Women's Cancer Action; Founder, Women's Cancer Resource Center (has lived with cancer)
Rep. Karen Clark, RN: State Representative and Volunteer Executive Director, Women's Environmental Institute (has lived with cancer)
Karen Einesman: Program Director, Women's Cancer Action

Broadcast: in Minneapolis/St. Paul KFAI-FM, 90.3/106.7/Streamed @ KFAI.org 9-10AM, Monday, October 18

Archived: Click here

If you liked reading this article, consider contributing a cuppa jove to Evergreene Digest--using the donation button in the above right-hand corner—so we can bring you more just like it.

Summary | Gulf Coast Oil Spill Disaster: Week of October 17

4 New Items including:

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  • America Moves On From Spill, Gulf Coast Feels Abandoned
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  • Watch Crude Justice and hold BP accountable
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David Culver, ed., Evergreene Digest

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Tony Auth

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White House to Lift Ban on Deep-Water Drilling,  Peter Baker, New York Times | NY
Obusha surrenders again

America Moves On From Spill, Gulf Coast Feels Abandoned, Jay Reeves, Huffington Post
"Awareness has dropped. People don't really care about the people who were affected. They don't care about the fish life," said Edmonds, founder of Taking Back the Gulf.

White House squelched release of BP oil spill estimates, Renee Schoof and Margaret Talev, McClatchy Newspapers

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  • The staff paper does not assign any motive to the administration’s moves but says the underestimating of flow rates “undermined public confidence in the federal government’s response” by creating the impression the government was either incompetent or untrustworthy. The paper said that the loss of trust “fuels public fears.”
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  • BP and Administration: Lies, Deceit, and Coverup in the Gulf
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  • Experts question BP's take on Gulf oil spill
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Watch Crude Justice and hold BP accountable, Ed Begley, Jr., Alliance for Justice

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  • I am honored to serve as the narrator for this important film and I hope that you will join me and get involved by signing the petition,  watching Crude Justice online, or volunteering to organize a screening of the film in your city. The people we interviewed asked us to carry a message back to the rest of the country that they don’t want to be forgotten. Help us make sure that message is heard.
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  • Experts question BP's take on Gulf oil spill
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  • BP and Administration: Lies, Deceit, and Coverup in the Gulf
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