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How to Talk About Climate Change So Anyone Will Listen

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There’s still no one “right” way to talk about climate change so that everyone will hear — but there are ways to up your chances of getting someone to listen.

Olivia Campbell, New York Magazine

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November 30, 2016 | Here’s a very 2016 dilemma: On the one hand, as so many of us have learned over this past election cycle (and then re-learned in earnest over Thanksgiving), having political conversations with friends and family can be its own unique kind of painful. But on the other hand, some issues are just too urgent to leave undiscussed.

Climate change is one of those issues: While we’re stalled out in first gear fighting over whether it even exists, the forecasts of impending doom grow worse — and more urgent — every day. Which means that, as painful as it may be, talking about it with your friends and family is vital. “Breaking the social silence around climate change — getting people to really begin identifying with the issue and what it means — is a crucial first step for individuals to effect change,” says Adam Corner, research director for the British nonprofit Climate Outreach and co-author of the new book Talking Climate.

Olivia Campbell: New York Magazine

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How We Got to Standing Rock - and How You Can Help

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Part 1: The Many Ways to Help Standing Rock

Even if you can’t show up at the wintry encampments, you can join water protectors in other ways: from calling the North Dakota governor to breaking up with your bank.

Part 2: Climate Justice Meets Racism: This Moment at Standing Rock Was Decades in the Making

North Dakota’s militarized response to activists opposing the Dakota Access pipeline—and the Standing Rock Sioux’s fierce resolve—reflect the area's particular racial divides.

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

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Part 1: The Many Ways to Help Standing Rock

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Photo by Lori Panico.

Even if you can’t show up at the wintry encampments, you can join water protectors in other ways: from calling the North Dakota governor to breaking up with your bank.

Sarah van Gelder, YES! Magazine

Nov 29, 2016 | The timing couldn’t have been more awful.

The day after Thanksgiving, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers told the Standing Rock Sioux tribe that people camped at the Oceti Sakowin Camp would be considered trespassers on that federally managed land after Dec. 5. With thousands of people, it is the largest of the water protectors’ camps. Next came the snow, which is piling up across the camp as I write. North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple ordered an immediate evacuation allegedly out of concern for the well-being of water protectors in the “harsh winter weather.”

“He gave a whole list of concerns … that we’re going to freeze to death and the solution is to cut off emergency services,” said Tara Houska, an organizer from Honor The Earth, at a news conference on Monday. The move evokes the “collective memory of Native people being pushed off land,” she added. “In 2016, that history is still happening.”

Sarah van Gelder wrote this article for YES! Magazine. Sarah is co-founder and editor at large of YES! Magazine. Her new book, “The Revolution Where You Live: Stories from a 12,000-Mile Journey Through a New America” is available now from YES!

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Part 2: Climate Justice Meets Racism: This Moment at Standing Rock Was Decades in the Making

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Chairman Archambault (left) and Chief Arvol Looking Horse. Photo by Jenni Monet.

North Dakota’s militarized response to activists opposing the Dakota Access pipeline—and the Standing Rock Sioux’s fierce resolve—reflect the area's particular racial divides.

Jenni Monet, YES! Magazine

Sep 16, 2016 | Attack dogs and waves of arrests by police in riot gear could look like isolated incidents of overreaction to the activism stemming from the Standing Rock reservation. But for the Lakota Sioux who live in these marginalized hillsides, the escalated militarization behind their battle against the Dakota Access pipeline is a situation decades in the making.

North Dakota is not the whitest state in America, but it’s arguably the most segregated. More than 60 percent of its largest minority population, Native Americans, lives on or near reservations. Native men are incarcerated or unemployed at some of the highest rates in the country. Poverty levels for families of the Standing Rock tribe are five times that of residents living in the capital city, Bismarck. In Cannon Ball, the heart of the tribal community, there are rows of weathered government homes, but no grocery store. Tucked behind a lonely highway, this is where mostly white farmers and ranchers shuttle to and from homesteads once belonging to the Sioux.

Jenni Monet wrote this article for YES! MagazineJenni is an award-winning journalist and tribal member of the Pueblo of Laguna in New Mexico. She’s also executive producer and host of the podcast Still Here, launching in September 2016. 

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Series | A Living Earth Economy, Part 3: How to Break the Power of Money

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We can refuse to accept the pervasive, but false, claims that money is wealth and a growing GDP improves the lives of all.

David Korten, Yes! Magazine 

http://www.yesmagazine.org/new-economy/how-to-break-the-power-of-money-20160810/power-of-money.gif/image Aug 10, 2016 | Our current political chaos has a simple explanation. The economic system is driving environmental collapse, economic desperation, political corruption, and financial instability. And it isn’t working for the vast majority of people.

It serves mainly the interests of a financial oligarchy that in the United States dominates the establishment wings of both the Republican and Democratic parties. So voters are rebelling against those wings of both parties—and for good reason.

As a society we confront a simple truth. An economic system based on the false idea that money is wealth—and the false promise that maximizing financial returns to the holders of financial assets will maximize the well-being of all—inevitably does exactly what it is designed to do:

David Korten wrote this article for YES! Magazine as part of his new series of biweekly columns on “A Living Earth Economy.” David is co-founder and board chair of YES! Magazine, president of the Living Economies Forum, co-chair of the New Economy Working Group, a member of the Club of Rome, and the author of influential books, including When Corporations Rule the World and Change the Story, Change the Future: A Living Economy for a Living Earth. His work builds on lessons from the 21 years he and his wife, Fran, lived and worked in Africa, Asia, and Latin America on a quest to end global poverty.

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Previously in this series

Part 2: We Never Voted for Corporate Rule

Part 1: The Elephant in the Room: What Trump, Clinton, and Even Stein Are Missing

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Deconstructing Thanksgiving at Standing Rock

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"With their heroic stand to deconstruct the Dakota Access pipeline, the indigenous tribes gathered at Standing Rock are also deconstructing Thanksgiving." (Photo: Joe Brusky/Overpass Light Brigade/flickr/cc)

  • With their heroic stand to deconstruct the Dakota Access pipeline, the indigenous tribesgathered at Standing Rock are also deconstructing Thanksgiving. And they are showing us a path for the future that should inspire us for the difficult times ahead: a future based on respect for Mother Earth and all species, cooperation, generosity, nonviolence, humility and love.
  • Related: A Pipeline Fight and America's Dark Past

Medea Benjamin, Common Dreams

November 24, 2016 | It is with a heavy heart that I travel to Standing Rock to give thanks and serve meals to the water protectors who, in the freezing weather, have braved attack dogs, tear gas, water cannons, rubber bullets, percussion grenades and other forms of state-sanctioned violence. This Thanksgiving comes on the heels of a particularly heart-wrenching day, Nov. 21, when over 150 activists were injured, receiving treatment for hypothermia, contamination by tear gas, and traumas from rubber bullets. One activist, 21-year-old Sophia Wilansky, will spend the holiday undergoing a third surgery on her shattered arm that was ripped apart by an exploding concussion grenade.

It is appalling that these fierce attacks against peaceful activists are happening under President Barack Obama’s watch, and these water protectors are anticipating even greater repression when Donald Trump gets to the White House. During the campaign, Trump promised to roll back regulations on the fossil fuel industry and unleash “a treasure trove of untapped energy.”

Medea Benjamin (medea@globalexchange.org), co-founder of Global Exchange and CODEPINK: Women for Peace,and author of a forthcoming book on Saudi Arabia, Kingdom of the Unjust. Her previous books include: Drone Warfare: Killing by Remote Control; Don’t Be Afraid Gringo: A Honduran Woman Speaks from the Heart, and (with Jodie Evans) Stop the Next War Now (Inner Ocean Action Guide).

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A Pipeline Fight and America's Dark PastBill McKibben,  New Yorker Magazine 

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The events at Standing Rock also allow Americans to realize who some of the nation’s most important leaders really are. The fight for environmental sanity—against pipelines and coal ports and other fossil-fuel infrastructure—has increasingly been led by Native Americans, many of whom are in that Dakota camp today. They speak with real authority—no one else has lived on this continent for the longterm. They see the nation’s history more clearly than anyone else, and its possible future as well. 

For once, after all these centuries, it’s time to look through their eyes. History offers us no chances to completely erase our mistakes. Occasionally, though, we do get a chance to show we learned something.

Bill McKibben is Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College and co-founder of 350.org. His most recent book is Earth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet.

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