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Health, Science & Environment

A new report rated countries on ‘sustainable development.’ The U.S. did horribly.

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For Jeffrey Sachs, the Columbia University economist and U.N. adviser, the poor score of the United States underscores that, while we’ve done exceedingly well economically, we’ve neglected the social and the environmental dimensions of progress — issues ranging from equality to ecosystem preservation.

Chris Mooney, Washington (DC) Post

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https://img.washingtonpost.com/wp-apps/imrs.php?src=https://img.washingtonpost.com/rf/image_960w/2010-2019/WashingtonPost/2015/09/25/Local-Enterprise/Images/2015-09-25T151615Z_01_NYK202_RTRIDSP_3_UN-ASSEMBLY.jpg&w=1484 Pope Francis addresses attendees in the opening ceremony to commence a plenary meeting of the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 2015 at the United Nations headquarters in Manhattan, New York September 25, 2015. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

July 21, 2016 | Last September, urged on by Pope Francis, the United Nations and its 193 member states embraced the most sweeping quest yet to, basically, save the world and everyone in it — dubbed the Sustainable Development Goals. It’s a global agenda to fix climate change, stop hunger, end poverty, extend health and access to jobs, and vastly more — all by 2030.

The goals comprise no less than 17 separate items and 169 “targets” within them. And this isn’t just an airy exercise — the targets are quite specific (“By 2030, progressively achieve and sustain income growth of the bottom 40 per cent of the population at a rate higher than the national average”). That means that at least in many cases, countries can actually be measured on how they’re faring in meeting these goals, based on a large range of sociological, economic and other indicators.

 

Chris Mooney writes about energy and the environment at The Washington Post. He previously worked at Mother Jones, where he wrote about science and the environment and hosted a weekly podcast. Chris spent a decade prior to that as a freelance writer, podcaster and speaker, with his work appearing in Wired, Harper’s, Slate, Legal Affairs, The Los Angeles Times, The Post and The Boston Globe, to name a few.

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Related:

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Earth%20Floating%20on%20the%20Sea.jpg Global Warming Threatens the Material Basis of the Global Economy, Tim Radford, Climate News Network  / TruthDig

 

Special Report | Managing Climate Change

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  • Part 1: 31 scientific societies just told Congress to take their climate denial and shove it.

The problem, though, is that it's unlikely to do anything to change the toxic dynamic on Capitol Hill or beyond.

  • Part 2: Thanks to upcoming heat wave, July 2016 may become the hottest month on record in the U.S.

Human-caused climate change makes it more likely that warm temperature records will be set. 

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

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Part 1: 31 scientific societies just told Congress to take their climate denial and shove it.

The problem, though, is that it's unlikely to do anything to change the toxic dynamic on Capitol Hill or beyond.

Facts won't carry the day, at least not right now.

Andrew Freedman, Yahoo News

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/ABPub/2011/04/04/2014681395.gifJune 29, 2016 | Scientists have had enough of Congress' climate denial. On Tuesday, a whopping 31 major scientific groups — representing tens of thousands of researchers — delivered a joint letter to Capitol Hill to present a unified front on the seriousness of human-caused global warming and the need to address it.

 

The 3-page letter, which is a more forceful version of a 2009 letter to which 19 scientific societies signed on, comes as the House Science Committee continues to investigate peer reviewed studies of climate change. 

Andrew Freedman is Mashable's Science Editor. Prior to working at Mashable, Freedman was a Senior Science writer for Climate Central. He was ranked as the most prolific climate reporter in the U.S. in 2012, and the second-most prolific in 2013. 

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Part 2: Thanks to upcoming heat wave, July 2016 may become the hottest month on record in the U.S.

Human-caused climate change makes it more likely that warm temperature records will be set.

http://i.amz.mshcdn.com/6d8USsPHwcAkNondzEi7dpMbHcw=/950x534/https%3A%2F%2Fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2Fuploads%2Fcard%2Fimage%2F146550%2FHeatWaveJuly2016.jpg Computer model projection of the "misery index" of heat and humidity on July 18, 2016. Image: http://earth.nullschool.net

June 16, 2016 | A noteworthy weather pattern will evolve next week across the lower 48 states, featuring a massive and intense area of high pressure sprawled out across the center of the country, like an annoying partner taking up the entire bed while snoring loudly. 

It's been clear for several days that a prolonged heat wave is coming, particularly for the Plains, portions of the Midwest and Southeast.

Andrew Freedman is Mashable's Science Editor. Prior to working at Mashable, Freedman was a Senior Science writer for Climate Central. He was ranked as the most prolific climate reporter in the U.S. in 2012, and the second-most prolific in 2013. 

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How America’s Wars Came Home With the Troops

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Since 2002, veterans have been committing murder individually and in groups, killing family, friends, strangers and—in appalling numbers—themselves.

Ann Jones, the Nation

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https://www.thenation.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/ft_hood_shooting_april_3_2014_reuters_img_0.jpgSergeant First Class Erick Rodriguez stands guard at Fort Hood after Ivan Lopez’s shooting rampage in Texas on April 2, 2014. (Reuters/Erich Schlegel)

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Editor%20Comment%20graphic_0.jpg Evergreen Digest Editor's Note: Sources are now being quoted to the effect that the shooter in the recent Dallas police massacre was an Afghanistan veteran.

April 17, 2014 | After an argument about a leave denied, Specialist Ivan Lopez pulled out a .45-caliber Smith & Wesson handgun and began a shooting spree at Fort Hood, America’s biggest stateside base, that left three soldiers dead and sixteen wounded. When he did so, he also pulled America’s fading wars out of the closet. This time, a Fort Hood mass killing, the second in four and a half years, was committed by a man who was neither a religious nor a political “extremist.” He seems to have been merely one of America’s injured and troubled veterans who now number in the hundreds of thousands.

Some 2.6 million men and women have been dispatched, often repeatedly, to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and according to a recent survey of veterans of those wars conducted by the Washington Post and the Kaiser Family Foundation, nearly one-third say that their mental health is worse than it was before they left, and nearly half say the same of their physical condition. Almost half say they give way to sudden outbursts of anger. Only 12 percent of the surveyed veterans claim they are now “better” mentally or physically than they were before they went to war.

Ann Jones is a journalist and author whose works include Kabul in Winter (2006) and War Is Not Over When It’s Over (2010), both from Metropolitan Books. Her latest book is called They Were Soldiers: How the Wounded Return From America's Wars—The Untold Story (Dispatch Books).

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Related:

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Disabled Veterans Shatter the Myths of American Warfare, Ann Jones, the Intercept

  • The military ambitions of the U.S. will not be restrained by the “true costs of war,” not even those exacted on the bodies of its soldiers.
  • A Trail of Tears

Where Did We Go Wrong?

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  • I never realized how dumb our cities are until I saw what a smart one looks like.
  • There's community and there's commuting. Let's not confuse the two.

Maz Ali, Upworthy

 

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March 10, 2015 | With the population growing and most of it happening in cities, these Canadian journalists wanted to take a closer look at whether our sprawling modern villages are up to the task of housing more humans.

Over half of the world lives in urban areas. That includes over 80% of people in the United States and 81% of folks in Canada, where this report was produced. Therein lies the problem.

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Maz Alii: Offender of the status quo. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter to help multiply good messages.

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