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Human Rights & Civil Liberties

Human Rights & Civil Liberties

Pat Bagley | TSA Rape / CagleCartoons.com

Why the TSA Can't Back Down

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  • We have a job here, too, and it's to be indomitable in the face of terrorism. The goal of terrorism is to terrorize us: to make us afraid, and make our government do exactly what the TSA is doing. When we react out of fear, the terrorists succeed even when their plots fail. But if we carry on as before, the terrorists fail­even when their plots succeed.
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  • Special Report | The Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
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  • This country has been reformatted. It has been downsized to fit your fears.
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Bruce Schneie, The Atlantic

Organizers of National Opt Out Day, the Wednesday before Thanksgiving when air travelers were urged to opt out of the full-body scanners at security checkpoints and instead submit to full-body patdowns -- were outfoxed by the TSA. The government pre-empted the protest by turning off the machines in most airports during the Thanksgiving weekend. Everyone went through the metal detectors, just as before.

Now that Thanksgiving is over, the machines are back on and the "enhanced" pat-downs have resumed. I suspect that more people would prefer to have naked images of themselves seen by TSA agents in another room, than have themselves intimately touched by a TSA agent right in front of them.

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Related:

Special Report | The Transportation Security Administration (TSA), David Culver, ed., Evergreene Digest

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  • The Real Threat to America
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  • The stench of the police state at US airports
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Why The FTC's Online Privacy Plan Won't Stop The Information Free-For-All

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  • Even as the FTC's proposal signals an encouraging readiness to take a more active role in safeguarding our personal information online, some see its first step as a timid one that fails to account for a greater set of privacy incursions that are no longer hypothetical.
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  • Reactions To FCC Net Neutrality Proposal Mixed
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Bianca Bosker, Huffington Post

The Federal Trade Commission's (FTC's) new proposal to protect our privacy online should do little to assuage your fears of a know-it-all Web watching, tracking and responding to your activities on the Internet.

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Last week (Nov 28-Dec 4), the Federal Trade Commission waded into the debate over online privacy, proposing a "do not track" system that would allow Internet users to keep online advertisers from monitoring their activities online.

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Although it is still up for debate, this "do not track" mechanism might be built into browsers and used to alert sites whether a user had requested not to receive targeted advertisements, which can be based on previous searches, pages visited online and geography, among other information.

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Reactions To FCC Net Neutrality Proposal Mixed, Amy Lee<amy.lee@huffingtonpost.com>, Huffington Post

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  • Response to the proposal as it stands has been far from unanimous praise. Initial excitement that the matter had been officially introduced at all was quickly subsumed by wariness over ambiguities in the proposal that seemed to allow broadband carriers to continue their old practices under the cover of a false openness.
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  • Why The Federal Trade Commission' s (FTC's) Online Privacy Plan Won't Stop The Information Free-For-All
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Investigate the TSA, Not the Guy Who Refused to Go Through Its 'Porno Scanners'

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  • The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is opening an investigation targeting John Tyner, who recieved an aggressive "pat down" at the airport when he refused to go through with the TSA's 'porno scanners.'
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  • Sign the petition demanding Congress investigate the TSA’s porno scanners, aggressive groping, and abuses of power,
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  • The 7 Creepiest Things About the TSA's "Porno Scanners"
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Jane Hamsher  Firedoglake

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The TSA is opening an investigation targeting John Tyner, the man who earned himself an aggressive “pat down” at the airport when he refused to go through the TSA’s new AIT “porno scanners.”

But it’s the TSA that should be investigated, not Tyner.

Tyner was now allowed board his flight after he refused to allow himself to be groped, and now he could face both prosecution and a fine of $11,000. But his real crime was making the “don’t touch my junk” video showing exactly what happened during his encounter with the TSA, which sparked a public backlash.

The new pat-down policy for refuseniks, which started on November 1, has been described by the Airline Pilots Association as “sexual molestation” — and it’s nothing more than a way to punish people who might boycott the Department of Homeland Security’s expensive new boondoggle scanners. And prosecuting Tyner is blatant and very public way to intimidate anyone who might follow his lead. This goes to show just how how constant threats of “terror” are used to create new markets for products nobody needs. The public is then intimidated into compliance in the name of “national security,” when in reality they’re sacrificing their dignity, their civil liberties and their tax dollars for the sake of enormous profits.

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Related:

Sign the petition demanding Congress investigate the TSA’s porno scanners, aggressive groping, and abuses of power, FireDogLake.com

The 7 Creepiest Things About the TSA's "Porno Scanners", Lauren Kelley, AlterNet

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  • The invasive scanners can see your tampons, give you cancer and make your grandmother cry -- and they're not cheap. Why do we keep using them?
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  • Special Report | The Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
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The 7 Creepiest Things About the TSA's "Porno Scanners"


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The invasive scanners can see your tampons, give you cancer and make your grandmother cry -- and they're not cheap. Why do we keep using them?
Special Report | The Transportation Security Administration (TSA)


Lauren Kelley, AlterNet

The recent, furious backlash against the TSA's degrading body scanners has drawn attention to the myriad ways the so-called "porno scanners" can violate one's privacy, civil rights and basic sense of dignity.

With National Opt-Out Day approaching the day before Thanksgiving, one of the busiest travel days of the year, here are several of the absolute creepiest things about scanners that everyone should keep in mind when flying at the holidays, or any other time of the year.

1. The scanner operators can see everything, including your pads and tampons. It's creepy enough that the scanners take naked pictures of passengers, but now recently-appointed TSA head John S. Pistole has told the New York Times that they can also detect sanitary napkins, and that such a finding could lead to passengers being pulled aside for extra security measures. Screeners "are expected to exercise some discretion," he said, but discretion about what? Can we expect an extra invasive pat-down of our crotches on heavy flow days?

More...

Related:

Special Report | The Transportation Security Administration (TSA), David Culver, ed,. Evergreene Digest

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  • The Real Threat to America
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  • The stench of the police state at US airports
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