You are here

Human Rights & Civil Liberties

Human Rights & Civil Liberties

Summary: Immigration Reform: Week of August 29

3 New Items including:

\r\n

    \r\n
  • Migrants turn to the sea to enter US illegally,
  • \r\n

  • Anti-Latino Hate Crimes Seen From Baltimore to Arizona
  • \r\n

\r\n

David Culver, ed., Evergreene Digest

David Fitzsimmons

Working the Line, Luis Alberto Urrea, Orion Magazine
The hidden life of the U.S. Border Patrol

Migrants turn to the sea to enter US illegally, Elliot Spagat, Associated Press, in Jacksonville Florida Times-Union | FL
In growing numbers, migrants are gambling their lives at sea as land crossings become even more arduous and likely to end in arrest

Anti-Latino Hate Crimes Seen From Baltimore to Arizona, Larry Keller, SPLC's Hate Watch
In today's overheated immigration climate, it’s a good bet more Hispanics will be beaten, even killed, as the debate — if it can be called that — rages on.

Anti-Latino Hate Crimes Seen From Baltimore to Arizona

\r\n

In today's overheated immigration climate, it’s a good bet more Hispanics will be beaten, even killed, as the debate — if it can be called that — rages on.

Larry Keller, SPLC's Hate Watch

Record-breaking high temperatures have been the norm this summer in the United States and other countries. But for Latinos, it’s been even hotter than the thermometer suggests, with one after another targeted for hate crimes around the country. Here’s a sampling of recent incidents.

\r\n

    \r\n
  • Early last Saturday (August 21) in Baltimore, Martin Rayez, 51, was beaten to death with a piece of wood. The man arrested for the crime, Jermaine Holley, 19, allegedly confessed and told police that he “hated Hispanics.” He has been treated in the past for schizophrenia. The killing occurred in East Baltimore, the scene of other recent attacks on Latinos.
  • \r\n

\r\n

More...

Migrants turn to the sea to enter US illegally

\r\n

In growing numbers, migrants are gambling their lives at sea as land crossings become even more arduous and likely to end in arrest

\r\n

Elliot Spagat, Associated Press, in Jacksonville Florida Times-Union | FL

The speedboat is about three miles offshore when a U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent cuts the engine to drift on the current in quiet darkness, hoping for the telltale signs of immigrant smuggling — sulfur fumes or a motor's whirr.

\r\n

"It's like trying to find a needle in a haystack, and the haystack is the Pacific Ocean," agent Tim Feige nutes before sunrise marks the end to another uneventful shift.

\r\n

This is a new frontier for illegal immigrants entering the United States — a roughly 400-square-mile ocean expanse that stretches from Tijuana, Mexico, to Los Angeles. In growing numbers, migrants are gambling their lives at sea as land crossings become even more arduous and likely to end in arrest

\r\n

More...

DEA Seeks Ebonics Translators to Decipher Black Peoples' Phone Conversations

Don't get the wrong idea: this has nothing to do with the drug war being racist; they just need expert testimony to help win drug cases.

\r\n

Scott Morgan, StoptheDrugWar.org

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Ken Mitchell

\r\n

Ever since NAACP endorsed marijuana legalization in California, there's been a raging debate over whether the drug war targets black communities. Looks like the DEA just settled it.

\r\n

Atlanta  — Federal agents are seeking to hire Ebonics translators to help interpret wiretapped conversations involving targets of undercover drug investigations.

The Drug Enforcement Administration recently sent memos asking companies that provide translation services to help it find nine translators in the Southeast who are fluent in Ebonics, Special Agent Michael Sanders said Monday. [AP]

\r\n

But don't get the wrong idea. This has nothing to do with the drug war being racist. They just need expert testimony to help win drug cases:
"You can maybe get a general idea of what they're saying, but you have to understand that this has to hold up in court," he said. "You need someone to say, 'I know what they mean when they say 'ballin' or 'pinching pennies.'"

\r\n

More...

Other Countries Probing Bush-era Torture — Why Aren't We?

\r\n

"That's part of why we're so concerned. The Obama administration, rather than investigate the abuses of the last eight years, has increasingly become an obstacle to accountability."

Shashank Bengali, the McClatchy Newspapers, in Common Dreams

In June, the Supreme Court refused to hear the case of a Canadian man who contends that U.S. authorities mistook him for an al Qaida operative in 2002 and shipped him to a secret prison in Syria, where he was beaten with electrical cables and held in a grave-like cell for 10 months.

\r\n

Four years earlier, however, the Canadian government had concluded an exhaustive inquiry and found that the former prisoner, Maher Arar, was telling the truth. Canada cleared Arar of all ties to terrorism and paid him $10 million in damages, and his lawyers say he's cooperating with an investigation into the role of U.S. and Syrian officials in his imprisonment and reported torture.

\r\n

More...

Pages