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Human Rights & Civil Liberties

Human Rights & Civil Liberties

Steve Sack | Standing Rock Scissors / /media.cagle.com

What you — yes, you — can do to save America from tyranny

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Here are 20 lessons from across the fearful 20th century, adapted to the circumstances of today.

Timothy Snyder, Dallas (TX) News

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Defend%20Civil%20Liberties%20Graphic_1.jpgNovember 21, 2016 | Americans are no wiser than the Europeans who saw democracy yield to fascism, Nazism or communism. Our one advantage is that we might learn from their experience. Now is a good time to do so.

Here are 20 lessons from across the fearful 20th century, adapted to the circumstances of today.

Timothy Snyder, Contributor, Dallas (TX) News <http://www.dallasnews.com>, a Yale history professor and historian of Eastern Europe, originally published this on Facebook. He is the author of "Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning."

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Special Report | War On The Homeless- Day Jobs, Not Tickets

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  • Part 1: War On The Homeless 
  • Cities All Over America Are Passing Laws Making It Illegal To Feed And Shelter Those In Need
  • Part 2: Albuquerque Gives Panhandlers Day Jobs, Not Tickets
  • While other cities try to regulate or ban panhandlers, Albuquerque, N.M., offers them an income and social services for the day.

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

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Part 1: War On The Homeless 

Cities All Over America Are Passing Laws Making It Illegal To Feed And Shelter Those In Need

blogfactory

http://blogfactory.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/unnamed-24.jpg December 07, 2016 | If you want to be a “Good Samaritan” to the homeless in your community, you might want to check and see if it is legal first.  All over the country, cities are passing laws that make it illegal to feed and shelter the homeless.  For example, in this article you will read about a church in Maryland that was just fined $12,000 for simply allowing homeless people to sleep outside the church at night.  This backlash against homeless people comes at a time when homelessness in America is absolutely exploding.  In a previous article, I shared with my readers the fact that the number of homeless people in New York City has just set a brand new all-time high, and the homelessness crisis in California has become so severe that the L.A. City Council has formally asked Governor Jerry Brown to declare a state of emergency.  Sadly, instead of opening up our hearts to the rapidly growing number of Americans without a home, way too many communities are trying to use the law to force them to go somewhere else.

For nearly two thousand years, churches have been at the forefront of helping the poor and disadvantaged, but now many communities are trying to stop this from happening.  Earlier today, I was absolutely stunned when I came across an article that talked about how a church in Dundalk, Maryland has been fined $12,000 for allowing the homeless to sleep outside the church at night.

blogfactory: the on-line magazine for you

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Part 2: Albuquerque Gives Panhandlers Day Jobs, Not Tickets

While other cities try to regulate or ban panhandlers, Albuquerque, N.M., offers them an income and social services for the day.

J.B. Wogan, Governing

Participants in Albuquerque's "There's a Better Way" initiative working on a city beautification project. All photos provided by the city of Albuquerque, used with permission.

October 13, 2015 | Twice a week, a city van rolls through downtown Albuquerque, N.M., stopping at popular panhandling locations. The driver, Will Cole, asks panhandlers if they want a day job. Work pays $9 an hour, higher than the state's $7.50 minimum wage. The city's public works department can employ up to 10 people a day for beautification projects, such as pulling weeds and picking up litter. The van has been in circulation since September, and while "we get a couple no's here and there," said Cole, he's usually finds 10 people willing to trade panhandling for a day job.

The van initiative is part of a larger effort in Albuquerque to reduce homelessness and panhandling. In May, the city started posting blue and white signs at intersections that list a 311 phone number and a website. Panhandlers can call the number to connect with services. At the same time, motorists can visit the website, managed by the United Way of Central New Mexico, to donate to a local shelter, food bank or an employment fund to pay panhandlers' wages.

J.B. Wogan, Staff Writer, Governing

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Fidel Castro - The Voice of the Third World

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  • “The inhuman exploitation on the peoples of three continents,” he said in reference to Africa, Asia and Latin America, “marked forever the destiny and lives of over 4.5 billion people living in the Third World today.” It was this history, he said, that left “the current victims of that atrocity” in poverty, unemployment, illiteracy and sickness. Castro’s words mirrored reality. He would not end there. It was hope, not despondency, that captured his personality.
  • Related: Michael Parenti | These Countries Are Not Underdeveloped, They Are Overexploited

Vijay Prashad, The Hindu / Portside

https://portside.org/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/field/image/castro-mbeki.jpg?itok=R6bf-GJD Brutally honest: “Fidel Castro’s words at the World Conference Against Racism mirrored reality.” President Castro with his South African counterpart Thabo Mbeki in Durban in 2001. File Photo - The Hindu

November 28, 2016 | Fidel Castro was the mirror of Africa, Asia and Latin America’s aspirations

The room went silent at the UN’s 2001 World Conference Against Racism when Fidel Castro entered. He took the podium and firmly denunciated not only racism, but also the deep scars inflicted by capitalism. “The inhuman exploitation on the peoples of three continents,” he said in reference to Africa, Asia and Latin America, “marked forever the destiny and lives of over 4.5 billion people living in the Third World today.” It was this history, he said, that left “the current victims of that atrocity” in poverty, unemployment, illiteracy and sickness. Castro’s words mirrored reality. He would not end there. It was hope, not despondency, that captured his personality. “I believe in the mobilisation and the struggle of the peoples!” he said. “I believe in the idea of justice! I believe in truth! I believe in man!”

Vijay Prashad is Professor of International Studies at Trinity College and Chief Editor of LeftWord Books.

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Michael Parenti | These Countries Are Not Underdeveloped, They Are Overexploited (1986), James Thompson, dandelionsalad

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  • “The revolution that feeds the children gets my support.”
  • Related: Haiti's Aftershocks: Rape Gangs, Disaster Profiteers, and AWOL Aid

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How We Got to Standing Rock - and How You Can Help

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Part 1: The Many Ways to Help Standing Rock

Even if you can’t show up at the wintry encampments, you can join water protectors in other ways: from calling the North Dakota governor to breaking up with your bank.

Part 2: Climate Justice Meets Racism: This Moment at Standing Rock Was Decades in the Making

North Dakota’s militarized response to activists opposing the Dakota Access pipeline—and the Standing Rock Sioux’s fierce resolve—reflect the area's particular racial divides.

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

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Part 1: The Many Ways to Help Standing Rock

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Photo by Lori Panico.

Even if you can’t show up at the wintry encampments, you can join water protectors in other ways: from calling the North Dakota governor to breaking up with your bank.

Sarah van Gelder, YES! Magazine

Nov 29, 2016 | The timing couldn’t have been more awful.

The day after Thanksgiving, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers told the Standing Rock Sioux tribe that people camped at the Oceti Sakowin Camp would be considered trespassers on that federally managed land after Dec. 5. With thousands of people, it is the largest of the water protectors’ camps. Next came the snow, which is piling up across the camp as I write. North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple ordered an immediate evacuation allegedly out of concern for the well-being of water protectors in the “harsh winter weather.”

“He gave a whole list of concerns … that we’re going to freeze to death and the solution is to cut off emergency services,” said Tara Houska, an organizer from Honor The Earth, at a news conference on Monday. The move evokes the “collective memory of Native people being pushed off land,” she added. “In 2016, that history is still happening.”

Sarah van Gelder wrote this article for YES! Magazine. Sarah is co-founder and editor at large of YES! Magazine. Her new book, “The Revolution Where You Live: Stories from a 12,000-Mile Journey Through a New America” is available now from YES!

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Part 2: Climate Justice Meets Racism: This Moment at Standing Rock Was Decades in the Making

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Chairman Archambault (left) and Chief Arvol Looking Horse. Photo by Jenni Monet.

North Dakota’s militarized response to activists opposing the Dakota Access pipeline—and the Standing Rock Sioux’s fierce resolve—reflect the area's particular racial divides.

Jenni Monet, YES! Magazine

Sep 16, 2016 | Attack dogs and waves of arrests by police in riot gear could look like isolated incidents of overreaction to the activism stemming from the Standing Rock reservation. But for the Lakota Sioux who live in these marginalized hillsides, the escalated militarization behind their battle against the Dakota Access pipeline is a situation decades in the making.

North Dakota is not the whitest state in America, but it’s arguably the most segregated. More than 60 percent of its largest minority population, Native Americans, lives on or near reservations. Native men are incarcerated or unemployed at some of the highest rates in the country. Poverty levels for families of the Standing Rock tribe are five times that of residents living in the capital city, Bismarck. In Cannon Ball, the heart of the tribal community, there are rows of weathered government homes, but no grocery store. Tucked behind a lonely highway, this is where mostly white farmers and ranchers shuttle to and from homesteads once belonging to the Sioux.

Jenni Monet wrote this article for YES! MagazineJenni is an award-winning journalist and tribal member of the Pueblo of Laguna in New Mexico. She’s also executive producer and host of the podcast Still Here, launching in September 2016. 

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